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I have owned this property for 3 years. The first 2 we were in drought so no berries. but this year with all the rain in april,may june I have lots of berries.
I took a tape measure out tonight it sits between two fence lines the measurment are 35 feet across and 60 feet long/ They are out of control I picked 10 gallons but just along the fence line on both sides. the middle of it is thick and 5 feet tall Iam not gonna go in there but the berries are going to waste. What is the best way to get it under contro should I wait till winter?
I have several waterbed materses and some old carpet about 8x10 cant use the lawnmower. There is a lot of berries going to waste they are selling them for $14.00 a gallon here,paula
 

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I wish I had as many blackberries as you are getting! We are getting some though and I have the scratches on my arms to prove it! Lol

Am interested in reading what more experience blackberry tamers have to say!
:)
 

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Blackberry bushes/vines are very similar to raspberry vines. We dig up some of our wild raspberry vines that grow in the woods (the more promising vines), and transplant them at the edge of our pastures in a row about 3-4 feet apart.

And old (92) neighbor once taught us to stake them up, 7 new canes to a spot. New raspberry canes have a white powderish look to them (I'm not sure if the blackberry vines are the same - maybe someone else could verify that). In the early spring, cut out the old canes and any extras, leaving only 7. Trim them down to about 3-4 feet tall and tie them up to the stake. They produce really well that way and are much easier to harvest.

We don't have many wild blackberry vines... actually very few, so I haven't bothered transplanting them... (altho if I did maybe we'd get more new starts).

Sounds like a big job with what you have but it certainly would be worth it in the long run. When they're done producing berries this year, start transplanting them into rows elsewhere, follow the above directions - and you'll have a great blackberry patch for years and years to come.

You may not get berries the first year after transplanting but you should the following year.

The reason they spread like that is the canes grow long, touch the ground and root where they're touching the ground, producing a new plant there. With nobody tending to them, they just spread into an unmanageable mess.

Good luck and happy berry picking for many years. Sounds like you're VERY blessed.
 

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Wow! You're getting 14.00 a gallon? Not here in the Nwest. We have BBerries coming out our.. well, we have lots and lots of Blackberries everywhere!

We just cut them back and they just grow and grow. Can't really get rid of them. That's ok. We love BB everything!
 

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Blackberries are more like summer raspberries ( blacks and some reds) they produce canes one year and then berries on those canes the next. Canes only produce berries one year - then they become just arm scratchers.

If you mow down all the canes this year - you will have no mature canes for next year. Mowing through the middle of the patch would be a good idea. You will lose some, but not all. At the end of the season this year - cut down all the canes that have born fruit -usually they are bigger and much tougher - almost brown wooded looking in some varieties.

If you decide to transplant - you might lose your crop for next year unless you water dilligently. So - either water, or don't cut down all the canes in the old patch.

Many transplant the canes around a large post and tie them to the post in the spring. The new canes that grow will fall towards the ground - so you can easily cut the old canes down and then tie up the new ones for the next year. The reason to cut them off at a certain height - between 3-4 feet: the berries are actually formed on side shoots off the main stem. Cutting the canes will stimulate side-shoot growth.

The difference between blackraspberries/blackberries/summer reds and the "fall" or everbearing red raspberries is that those raspberry canes will produce fruit in the fall and again in the spring. Many simply cut all canes off in the fall - completely to the ground- and have one larger early fall crop. Then you don't have to worry about the canes being killed in the winter.

I wish I had those blackberries! I bought 3 quarts for $15 and made 2 qts of blackberry pie filling.....those are going to be expensive pies!
 

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Callieslamb said:
The difference between blackraspberries/blackberries/summer reds and the "fall" or everbearing red raspberries is that those raspberry canes will produce fruit in the fall and again in the spring. Many simply cut all canes off in the fall - completely to the ground- and have one larger early fall crop. Then you don't have to worry about the canes being killed in the winter.
Wow, we don't get berries twice a year, only once. Maybe it's a different variety than ours? But all our black raspberries, blackberries, and red raspberries survive the winter with no special attention.

You're right Callie - those are going to be some expensive pies! But ohhh, so delicious.
 

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Shepherd said:
Wow, we don't get berries twice a year, only once. Maybe it's a different variety than ours? But all our black raspberries, blackberries, and red raspberries survive the winter with no special attention.
You would only get two crops if you have fall bearers and you cut the canes down after the summer crop to let the new canes produce fruit in the fall (actually August for me) I prefer a larger crop that starts to ripen in late July and once went through October!. The summer reds will only give one crop on last year's canes - like the blacks and blackberries. At least, this is how mine work.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Could you tell me how to make starts and to transplant,all this is new to me, but I want to learn,paula
 

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It looks like you are saying you can't use your mower on them, is that correct?
Anyway, I got out paper and pencil, did some figuring and came up with the following:


PxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxP

where P=the side you can pick and
x=the center of the patch you can’t reach.

If you where to cut the patch with the mower, leaving a 4' swath, cut a 4' swath,
leave a 4' swath, ect. you would end up with a patch looking like:


PxxP PxxP PxxP PxxP PxxP PxxP PP

You end up with 14 sides you can pick rather than just 2. Sure, you might loose some
this 1st year, but come next year and so on you have a lot more berry to pick.
 

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paulaswolfpack said:
Could you tell me how to make starts and to transplant,all this is new to me, but I want to learn,paula
Someone gave me sections of canes to keep moist, then plant when they looked like they were forming shoots. Won't bear fruit the 1st year but supposed to after that. You have to cut back the canes that have 'fruited' each year.

Patty
 

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paulaswolfpack said:
Could you tell me how to make starts and to transplant,all this is new to me, but I want to learn,paula
Well... it sounds like you have plenty of mature canes you could just dig up, which might be a better producer than starts but you can just take a clipping and root it in moist dirt.

I would think it'd be easier and less time consuming to just dig up the mature vines you already have which are well rooted. They're fairly easy to dig up and transplant. I do a few every year.
 

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I mow around and through the wild blackberry patches on my place, and that gets me a bunch more berries. I also bought some of the thornless blackberries from a nursery and have them running on a trelis of electical fence wire. I'm hoping this works better than relying on the wild ones.
 

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foxfiredidit said:
I mow around and through the wild blackberry patches on my place, and that gets me a bunch more berries. I also bought some of the thornless blackberries from a nursery and have them running on a trelis of electical fence wire. I'm hoping this works better than relying on the wild ones.
That's what I do to the wild ones as well. I bushhog through them so I can walk down the rows. We also have thornless. Navaho and Cherokee. They give us two separate batches which is nice. Navaho first, the several weeks later the cherokees produce. Saves me all kinds of thorn injuries.
 
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