T1-11 siding warping

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Matt Black, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    I built a 8'x12' chicken coop framed like a pole barn and covered it with 3/8" T1-11 siding. The guy at the lumber store said I didn't have to treat the siding. I bought some stain/sealer anyway but before I could put it on we had a couple days of rain. Now the siding on the long sides of the coop has warped in several spots in between the screws I used to put it up. At first I thought it might be because the bottom edge of the siding is sitting directly on the ground but it's also happened at the top.

    What did I do wrong?

    MB
     
  2. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    I've used T1-11 before and didn't have any problems. It's been a year, and I still haven't gotten around to painting it, so if I were to have any problems, they would have happened by now. Perhaps you just didn't use enough screws? I nailed mine up, one nail per foot. Is the siding in contact with the ground?
     

  3. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    i had it on a shed for 5 years no problum i think it is a screw issue allso
     
  4. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    Thanks for the replys. I used coated deck screws, I'm guessing every 15" or so.
    I might be able to draw it back tight if I get some longer screws.

    MB
     
  5. Ana Bluebird

    Ana Bluebird Well-Known Member Supporter

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    T 1-11 is not all the same. We used it on our house 8 years ago and it immediately started looking terrible. We went back to Sutherlands where we bought it and they said too bad. Go to the manufacturer, who said too bad, guess the glue wasn't put on right. It still looks terrible. Then we built a garage and used it from another supplier and it's been great for 5 years so far. Our son just built his house last year and his T-1-11 is doing fine. Just our bad luck.
     
  6. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    Matt Black,

    The key words in your post were "3/8 siding" and "it got rained on." The lightweight siding is nowhere near as tough as the heavier stuff. And consequently when it gets wet it will warp, bulge and be a problem if it is not painted immediately or before.

    The only way now to minimize the problem is to put in additional blocking and add many more nails (or screws) to flatten it out. AND GET IT PAINTED ASAP.

    When I have built structures where I knew the siding was 3/8 T1-11, I always prepainted all the siding before installation. And that goes a long way to prevent the problems you are facing. Another possible contributor here is if you spaced framing other than 16" oc. If at 24" oc lots more room for the ply to come and go in the weather.

    bearkiller
     
  7. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    15" in both directions? T1-11 should be used with a 16" OC frame.
     
  8. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    http://homesteadingtoday.com/showthread.php?t=75929


    You can see a picture of the way I framed it here. I screwed it in about every 15" along the horizontal girts. BTW, I got it at Sutherlands. You're probably right on the mark about it being too thin to go untreated. The scraps that were laying on the ground curled like pretzels.

    Where do I go from here? Should I try wetting it down to soften it again and putting in more screws and then treat it?
     
  9. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    Matt Black,

    Well gosh, you just proved the point all right with that photo. While the price of 3/8 T1-11 was not cheap, your substrate is completely inadequet for its use, plus fastenings are a problem.

    Here in the People's Republic, Code says framing 16"oc plus nailing 6"oc perimeter and 8"oc in the field. I am afraid you will not be able to get that ply to flatten out given your frame.

    I, too, have built pole frames similar to what you showed, but I also did my siding out of locally cut roughsawn 1 inch pine doing a board and bat siding. For me that was expensive as hell, but still cheaper than lumberyard prices. Looks like you have only small trees, but for those in an area of bigger trees splitting your own wood shingles is another option. All it costs is chainsaw gas, a froe, and time.

    OK. Now you've had a "learning experience" so next time you'll do even better. But as this is a chicken house, do the chickens really care?? Looks to me like you have an issue of "functional, but not esthetic", well, that's OK too. Life is a long adventure in learning.

    Three cheers for your wife. You ARE a lucky man, indeed. Do what you must to keep her happy.

    bearkiller
     
  10. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    So I screwed up, can't fix it and the lesson was $200.00? Ignorance isn't bliss, it's expensive!

    And no, I'm not worried at all about asthetics, I'm worried about the siding warping to the point that it won't keep the weather and varmints out and the chickens in.

    Thanks again,
    MB
     
  11. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    For T1-11 the nail/screw pattern should be 12" in the field, 8" along the edges.

    3/8" should only be used with 16" o.c framing or glued to an underlayment.
     
  12. ThreeJane

    ThreeJane Me Love Your Face

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    I'm wondering if you could line the inside with heavy gauge 2x2 wire/netting/fencing if it's warped so bad you can't screw it in. That will REALLY be aesthetically displeasing but should keep out varmints.
     
  13. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    I've always used 5/8" on 16 centers, with both ends sealed before nailing it up with ring shank nails. Never let it be in ground contact, as it will rot.

    I've had the stuff on the shop for many years - it looks as good as the day it went up....
     
  14. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Matt, before giving up add more girts - strong ones. The get some good deck screws and start fastening away. For a warp you may have to remove some screws already installed to leave the edges of the T-11 room to expand. Start putting new screws in the center and work towards the outside and the warp can push out. I'd put the screws no more than 6" or less apart in this case.
     
  15. mink

    mink Well-Known Member

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    what about cutting pieces to go vertically between your horizontals and screw it back down especially in the joints