Sweeter watermelons! And a good link i found.

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by insanity, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Found this while surfing today!
    When vines begin to ramble, give plants a dose of boron to help them produce sweeter fruits. Dissolve 1 tablespoon of household borax in 1 gallon of water and spray foliage and the base of the plants.
    Anybody ever tried this?

    Heres the link.Lots of growing tips.

    Burpee Seeds!
     
  2. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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  3. al

    al Well-Known Member

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    Thats a lot of good information. Thanks for the link. Too late this year to try it, but will sure try it next year Al.
     
  4. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I wonder if that would work for cantaloupes?
     
  5. Loriann1971

    Loriann1971 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I used their idea for planting watermelon on lawn. Instead of using tilled space in the garden, we chose a slope next to it and mixed a bag of humus and a bag of topsoil in a pile and planted our seeds...they are doing really well. They are rambling out over the slope and ready for the borax now.
     
  6. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    Go lightly on the boron. A very little is good. A little bit more and it starts to become toxic to the plants.

    .....Alan.
     
  7. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Hagan I just visited this beautiful grassy valley with cattle farms and no crops on it. There was a mineral springs 'resort' there, falling apart at the seams from neglect and unprofitability, but with their own solar energy plant. I asked them if they did any farming or gardening. They said that nobody in the valley raised anything more than hay because the water was too high in boron.

    It is a strange place. One of the mountains overlooking the valley is nearly barren except for some usually rare native plants. The soil is a mixture of serpentine and cinnabar--high in magnesium and mercury, and there are mercury mines operating there. Almost nothing grows due to the high magnesium in the dirt. If you find really red-looking clay and heat it in a sealed container, mercury will condense on the inner top of the container. Higher up the mountain on the far side is the world's only mine for Benitoite, a gemstone (pic at http://www.steveperrygems.com/gems/benito.htm. People are warned not to travel there when it is dusty because the level of asbestos fibers naturally occuring in the soil is dangerously high.

    Freakish geology. BLM land, for the most part, except for the mining claims and some cattle farms. I imagine it requires a lot of acreage per cow, and I kind of have to wonder if the meat gets contaminated...