Supplies?? planting trays, dirt???

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by SherrieC, Jun 5, 2005.

  1. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    Someone else on this list Must be a fellow market gardener, I need a place to order a skid of dirt, and a big load of planting flats, and other greenhouse supplies, like flats of mum starts. It's costing me way too much $$ by having to buy starting dirt, and I just don't realistically have the time to heat my own starter for this amount of volume. ( cooking your compost in the oven creates heat treating starter free of many weed seeds, & germs) Thank you very much.
     
  2. MaineFarmMom

    MaineFarmMom Columnist, Feature Writer

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  3. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    Well right now im in my office/library in front of the computer :haha:
    Sorry I'll go in and fix my info so people can see where when I post. Im in N.E. Indiana. A know a woman up here who buys skids of starter, she said your order must total over $400 , but the bugger won't give me the info to contact, because I suppose I'm competition

    My goat(Whoops! GOAL) for next spring (early Jan I talkin,) Is to place a large order, for a skid of dirt, and planting tray inserts, and maybe some plugs of starts.
     
  4. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are a lot of greenhouses in IN, and there have to be suppliers around. Check the phone book, not only for your area, but for the larger towns, too. The library has these in the reference section.

    You will probably have to place a minimum order, but it's safer than re-using inserts (which are hard to disinfect and bleach IS NOT a good thing to use as it gets into the plastic and ougasses later, affecting the plants) and easier than sterilizing your own soil.
     
  5. frankva

    frankva Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Piggybacking on this thread. Had some impatiens get fungaly and would like to sterilize the plastic trays they were in. Anyone have a good mix ratio or method?

    Rinse method?

    Or should I just hose them off, and let them get cold this Winter?

    Thanks ahead.
     
  6. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have you tried these folks? http://www.growerssupply.com/farm/supplies/home

    Also, Kalamazoo and this area is full of greenhouse and bedding plant growers. Might be woth a trip up here (soon, before they shut down) to ask around.

    Here's another: Key Blooms, Inc. Wholesale, 11304 Sprinkle Road, Vicksburg, 269-649-4551
    Wenke Greenhouses Wholesale, 5071 Market Street, Kalamazoo 269-349-9019
    Schram & Schram, Retail/Wholesale Bedding Plants, 7313 S. Westnedge, Portage 269-327-5347

    Hope this helps

    geo
     
  7. T-Bone 369

    T-Bone 369 Well-Known Member

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    Greenhoue Megastore in Danville, Il is going to be pretty close to you - we use them for our soil and flats and are very happy with them. If you call them the will pull your order and you can pick it up which saves shipping. We have also dealt with E & R in Monroe, In. I am not sure what they carry in the way of pots and do not have their catalog here at the house. They are Amish and the only way to get them quickly is to call (unfortunatly I don't have their number here either - sorry - I have a potato chip clip from them but it only gives their address). Again, they are good people to deal with.

    http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/
     
  8. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We use a quaternary compound called Zero Tol. It's the same thing that hospitals use to disinfect things -- greenhouse suppliers should carry it, or let you know where to get it (I don't remember where we got ours, sorry). I have also heard of people using Listerine, Lysol, and things like that, but have never tried them myself.

    Hosing them off and letting them dry before storage for the winter is always a good idea no matter what; I have no real idea about how freezing affects the dormant organisms, however.
     
  9. frankva

    frankva Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the reply. About enough Zero Tol to make a dip is what I need...$$$ I am also curious about regular household bleach.

    Standard for me is the hose and dry. Was thinking I need something a little more this year.:)
     
  10. oregon woodsmok

    oregon woodsmok Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I buy a truck load of sand, pine bark by the yard, and perlitte at the ag supply store. I've never had any problems with my home mix and I don't sterilize it.

    Neither do any of the local nurseries that are using the exact same things to mix their own potting mix. They've got big piles of all that stuff and they mix it with a bobcat loader.

    For cuttings I use a mixture of peat and perlitte right out of the bag.

    For my own plants that will be permanently in pots, I use gritty mix, but that is so expensive I'd never use it for plants I intend to sell. (turface, granite grit, pine bark)

    The only soil I bake around here is the sand that I give to the new born ducklings for grit.

    They are plants. They are genetically programed to live in dirt and manure. Unless you already have an established disease issue?
     
  11. oregon woodsmok

    oregon woodsmok Well-Known Member Supporter

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    PS: I don't start seeds or grow potted plants in "dirt". Dirt works fine in the flower beds, it is less satisfactory for pots.
     
  12. BruceC

    BruceC Well-Known Member

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    I would think Indiana soil is perfect just the way it is. Don’t over medicate. Till in some leaves, plant seeds and hoe out the weeds. You might be surprised.
     
  13. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bleach gets into plastic and wood and then outgasses -- NOT good for seedlings and plants.

    With the weather the way it's been this year -- cold and wet -- fungal diseases have been much more prevalent. It might be better to treat your plants than to alter your hose, dry, and freeze routine. While there are chemicals you can buy, you might also look up and try chamomile tea, garlic tea, and milk spray.
     
  14. frankva

    frankva Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is what I was leading up to. Tagged the plants, it is the trays in a stack I have been eyeballing.

    Thought about saltwater, but will probably just put them in the shed. Getting tools/things cooked in the sun and dry is the biggest battle I think.

    I can pass on outgassing.:)