sunburn in pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Bob the Homesteader, May 2, 2005.

  1. Bob the Homesteader

    Bob the Homesteader New Member

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    Just wondering if anyone knows what to do for a sunburned pig? We just got 3 pigs, approx 100# each, last week and we fenced off a lovely pig pen for them on full pasture. They have a large house and LOTS of shade at all times during the day. They have been raised in a hog barn until now and they are having so much fun rooting and running around but we noticed them turn a deep shade of pink after a couple of days. One also has very little hair and they are all white. They don't seem to be bothered by it, but we were concerned if there was anything we should do for them or will their skin eventually get used to being outside? Any thoughts?

    TIA
    Bob's Wife
     
  2. QueenB04

    QueenB04 Well-Known Member

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    My advice is keep a mudhole handy, if you're able to run water out to them by hose or water tank. Also we use woodstove ashes we've accumulated over the winter time and dump them in their pen, they love to roll in them and it helps for ticks, and parasites as well. Another thing we found works great is old grease and fryer oil. Ours love to eat it, but when they were in the garden pig tractors we had set up we'd dump it on the ground to encourage them to root. Well as soon as it was on the ground all you heard was 'thump' and lot's a grunts as they would absolutely saturate themselves in the oil. Hmmm what else. Oh, works great too, take garden ground cover cloth to make a little awning somewhere for them to get under, they really enjoy this, we would strech it over our pig tractor, seems to work really well for them as well. Hope these ideas help!
     

  3. marknfl

    marknfl Member

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    They need a mud hole. When we first started with hogs we had a white one that got sunburned. We were told to make a mud hole for them. Found a good spot and layed the hose there and had a big puddle on top of the ground the hogs turned it into a mud hole in short work. Just keep it wet and they will love it.

    Mark
     
  4. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    We have a mud hole and our pigs insist on sleeping and playing in the sun.
    For our sunburned weiners we put bag balm on the worst parts. Of course we had to make friends with our piggies first so they would let us do that.

    Our mud hole in under roof, our feed container and water drum are under roof also to help them stay out of the sun, but alas "the best laid plans...........".
     
  5. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    just think of it as pre browning the meat for you
    no seriously, i have yorkshire crosses, and they get sunburned all the time, in fact thats how we end up making friends with our sows, you know how itchy you get when the sunburn heals , well :D piggles like scratches too :D

    ours get leftover fryer grease when i change ours out
    but yeah , provide shade, and of course a mudhole for them
    they will tolerate some sunburn, just like us people , the first one hurts , but after that its not so bad
    we have very pink piggies soem times ...
    makes them look bad, but they seem ok with it , and the saddest part is our pen is partially wooded, so they Could stay out of the sun ... but they choose not to ...
    like siryet said, the best laid plans
     
  6. rosebudforglory

    rosebudforglory Member

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    (I realize this is an old post but maybe some of this can help a new owner - also we don't know if these were for meat or pets or breeding sows. They are kind big already - feeder pigs are usually smaller when first obtained but I reckon you can get them older to finish to mature weight.) They won't really get used to it - like some real fair skinned folks - just always burn and seldom tan. You will want to make a wallow for them to stay cool if outside in the day for all hogs. But whites will need more protection and there are sprays and lotions especially for pigs - like Sullivans Sun Guard or in a pinch high spf people sun prevention lotion but it can get expensive. There are other specialty livestock sun prevention products for pigs (also horses, cattle, goats) In your case with only 3 - I would just keep them in during the day and out to graze in late evening and night. If already sunburned - vinegar solution, aloe gel, or calamine lotion can take sting out and help soothe skin. If more than a little pink or the animal is in distress, get a vet out to assess damage and depth of burn, and to give pain meds, etc.. Pigs don't sweat and can quickly get overheated. It is best that a wallow or misting ring on a fan be used in a shaded area. In a pinch, spray down with a hose a couple times a day. The mud helps them stay cool, and helps keep the insects and sun off. Also heatstroke for pigs is very dangerous - if you find your pig in distress - please don't just throw cold water on him - you can cause shock and a heart attack. Get them out of sun or if unable to get moved, set up some sort of quick temporary overhead protection - get someone to stand with large umbrella, or cover with wrung out towels, (set a fan up to blow over towels), even a large sheet of cardboard will work. Just don't cover tightly or body heat won't be able to get out. Remember, dif very sunburned they will be in pain - be careful. You can use a very fine mist of water that isn't right out of ground or that has been very slightly warmed. If down in pasture, start sponging with tepid water from a bucket, set up something to block sun, and get someone to fan the pig with whatever you can find that is large enough to produce a breeze - call the vet. Think about how you have felt after a severe sunburn - pretty sick. Pigs can easily get heatstroke (trembling, increased breathing, loose stools, increased body temp, vomiting) and requires fast action on your part and a vet on the way. Indoors, large commercial barns keep fans running and misting rings - same for dairy cattle. Many homesteaders decide to not keep white hogs because sunburn is dangerous and very painful. Commercial farms - the animals are inside 24/7 no problem. Animals can die just like people. Skin can slough off, wounds can become infected and get flystrike. (maggots). Show pigs are oiled lightly with special oils and brushed each day and mostly kept out of the sun so they don't get bleached out and rough coated- many times they are walked in the shade or cooler times of day. Some oils can cause burning to be worse -especially if in full sun and no wallow. You also don't want to put anything on your pig that can be absorbed into their system (like used high detergent chemicals motor oil) through the skin - remember you are eating that pig. If you already have white pigs - do your best and get dark skin pigs next time - they can stay out all the time as long as they have shelter, shade trees and a wallow - pig heaven. Remember wild pigs are dark, they live outside all the time, spend their summer days lying around wet moist areas like creeks and forage in the woods days, and out in pastures/fields mostly at night. In the winter, they don't need the creek areas other than for water if in a cold zone and will use pine and cedar hollows, tree stumps, ditches to get out of weather. I have seen an animal on a vet call in very bad shape, with basically 3rd degree burns (skin falling off in sheets and a mass of puss). It was very sad as it screamed in pain while the vet prepared to put a too far gone animal down. Whether a food animal or a pet - they all deserve the best care we can give them. Keep in mind - it has been proven that high stress levels in food animals cause a overproduction of stress hormones and adrenalin which greatly affects the quality of the meat. An old pig farmer who kept about 300 sows and tons of feeder piglets raised each year said - I want my pigs to be unstressed happy healthy souls who only have one bad day in their life - and they never know when that day is coming.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
    Bryan Losing likes this.
  7. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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  8. rosebudforglory

    rosebudforglory Member

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