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I have a doe that has developed what I would call a mild cough. It's not constant nor severe, but I think I'd better get some Sulmet into her.

My question is how to dose her. The bottle doesn't give dosage levels for goats. Also, she share water with one other goat. Do I add the Sulmet to the amount of water that would be consumed in a day? Not sure how much that is. We change their water every day and just fill a large rubber bucket.

Any thoughts? What works for you?

Thanks!
 

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I've got a wether with loose stools right now so I went to the Fiascofarm website and got the dosage. I will be giving mine his with a needleless syringe if he doesn't firm up by tomorrow night when I get home. That way I know he got his daily dose.
 

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Thank you.
I have no idea why I didn't think to look there.
 

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This is a newbie question, but all advice is appreciated. I have a young goat that has developed a cough as well. He has no other symptoms. No fever, no nasal discharge, stools are fine. I wormed him today with a wormer specific to my area, that includes coverage for lungworms. Is there anything else I can give him? The wormer was Ivomec.
 

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I just re-read your post. Is Sulmet used for repiratory problems? I've only heard of it used for cocci.

There are some past threads on coughing goats. A search of this forum should get you some good info. Some people recommend Tylan 200.

Goats cough for a number of reasons just like people.
 

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I'm curious why you are using Sulmet for a cough? We use it for cocci prevention and treatment, but I haven't heard of using it for a respiratory thing.

If the goat is just coughing, no yucky discharge or labored breathing, I'm not sure it needs antibiotics. Could it just be dust fom the hay or something else irritating him? What about lung worms?
 

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It's a sulfa drug and works for all kinds of stuff. I use sulmet or aureomycin/sulmet powder in the drinking water for respiratory and digestive ills. It is labeled for such in cattle and fowl. Make sure the medicated water is their only source. If the condition is acute, you can administer it orally, as already mentioned. It generally provides inprovement in 3-4 days, and a full course in my system is 10 days. I sometimes continue use for cocci cure/prevention to 20 days.

I also use sulmet in water as a preventative intake regimen for quarantined new goats, especially those of "questionable" origin.
 

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I do think there is a tendency to run to meds without evaluating the whole picture. Is the goat acting off or otherwise any different other than the cough? Any fever or sub temp? No other symptoms? If not, a cough could be anything from allergy to dust in the environment to mild cold which would be viral. Unless you hear rattling in the lungs or other suspicous symptoms I might just keep an eye on her and see how this progresses. I have a couple goats who go through some pretty hacking coughs that last a few weeks and then disappear.
 

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moonspinner, yeah, that's what I used to do, too, until one goat with a clear but consistent cough that I watched ended up giving it to my whole herd. I learned from that, and cured the whole herd with aureomycin/sulmet in the drinking water, but I was sorry as I could be that I put them all through it. Nobody rattled, nobody got snotty...but pretty much they all ended up coughing.

Now I evaluate whether it is a cough that I am noticing that goat has a lot, and if it is, I "run to meds." Sub-acute respiratory diseases can delay successful breeding, so they can cost me money, besides what it costs to treat a whole herd instead of just one animal.

It has not been my experience that goats with a persistant cough, where I notice that the goat is coughing more than any other, are doing so due to dust or allergies or whatever. Usually a dust cough is a one-off, every once in a blue moon kind of thing, not something I take notice of in the same goat over and over.

When I do use antibiotics, and it is not often, they are used in a comparatively quick regimen and in sufficient quantity to nail the problem. I am not a believer in long-term or low-level use. 10 days is adequate for most stuff. I will go to 20 if it is conditions that breed cocci and I am already treating for symptomatic cocci in the herd.
 
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