Suffolk Fleece

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Pigeon Lady, Oct 28, 2005.

  1. Pigeon Lady

    Pigeon Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is Suffolk a good fleece for spinning/knitting/weaving?

    I asked my sons 4H leader if his wife spins the wool from their sheep and was surprised when he answered, "No she doesn't spin. We sometimes give some to a lady in town who uses it for crafts but most of it we just throw away."

    Is it an inferior wool? I hate to think of it being thrown away and plan to buy some off him if it's worth the work of preparing it for spinning.

    Thanks,

    P.
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    It is a course wool but if you can get it cheap enough or free......... Judge for yourself! Check my "need Volunteers" offer if its any help to you.
    Ross
     

  3. Celtic Herritag

    Celtic Herritag Celtic Heritage Farms

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    Yes you can use it just like any other sheep's wool, It's acctualy pretty good wool considering they're black faced. He'll probably give it away, I raise suffolks and they're wool coats varry but I've never had one that had an "inferior" wool coat, to put it so. Alot of black faed breeders don't bother with the wool because it isn't what the comercial industry is looking for but in no way is it unusable.
     
  4. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Think part of the problem is they are a "down" breed. Meaning their wool growth is normally very short. Short fleece makes it harder for the spinners to make a nice yarn. The Suffolks I have been around fleece varies a lot in Quality and softness.
     
  5. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    I've spun mine. It's a bit scratchier than the others. I think it works better for felting projects.
     
  6. ShortSheep

    ShortSheep Well-Known Member

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    I don't think there is any such thing as a bad fleece. Different fleeces being suitable for different purposes.
    Like Bergere said, the short staple can make it a challenge to spin, but you can always combine it with something else for easier spinning if you find it too short.
    I got my hands on a commercially processed suffolk fleece batt once and couldn't believe it was suffolk. Not the softest hand, but softer than what I expected from a meat breed.
    You might as well give it a try, see how you like it. :)
     
  7. Pigeon Lady

    Pigeon Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks all!

    Next time I see him I'll ask him to save me some. He said they don't have much since it's only a very small flock but I hate to see it go to waste.

    Ross, I may take you up on the offer to process it. I've always bought roving on Ebay and don't have any carders ect. Sounds like a good deal.

    Thanks again,

    P.L.
     
  8. backachersfarm

    backachersfarm Well-Known Member

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    The wool varies from animal to animal no matter which breed you are working with. I learned to spin on suffolk wool. We had a couple of them in our flock in recent yrs ant they had a staple of 4 inches..which is very good for spinning. It makes a very strong yarn that is good for socks....or anything else that will get a lot of wear. You don't have to have carders to spin it. When I was just starting out I was so poor I couldn't afford any equipment either. I spun in the grease by using a metal dog comb. Youcan spin lock by lock this way and get a worsted type yarn. Just flick the ends of the lock with the comb to open it up a little and spin away. Ply to whatever weight you need and wash it. I would tie it an about 4 place with cotton string and wash it as you would the wool. There are many opinions as to whether to weight the yarn as it dries.

    Sharon