Stump Removal

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by doc623, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    What is the best way for an individual with little or no knowldege/experience to remove stumps.
    These are of various sizes from 6" to 3' in diameter.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    Get a pig.

    No really, thats what I was told to do. Get a small pig, and watch them go crazy. They dig up everything in sight. Then when they are big enough, you get meat to boot!!
    I am doing it next year.
     

  3. Bresias

    Bresias Restless User

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    We have heavily wooded acreage. We pretty much decided not to remove ours. What ones we did remove left HUGE holes and giant, muddy root balls that are impossible to burn b/c of the dirt on them. It takes several years of winter burning to get them disappeared.

    Not sure where you live. We're in Idaho, and have some huge cedars and tamaracks, stumps all over.

    What my husband suggests is digging up the earth around the stump, lightly shoveling around the edges, and using a chainsaw to get the stump as flush with the ground as possible.

    We are faced with this problem, too, as this property was logged in deep winter. Some of the stumps are four feet tall.

    My husband is a firebug (he doesn't know I wrote that part!), so his other suggestion is this: Stack smaller dry wood in a teepee shape around the stump, and pour some diesel or charcoal lighter fluid on the wood, apply match or even better, propane torch. NEVER USE GASOLINE b/c of the flash.

    You can set up these teepees any time of year. Keep them covered with tarp so they stay dry. Burn them in the winter when it rains or snows, because if it starts burning real good, it will burn for weeks, safer that way.

    Also, putting an old car tire under the teepee will encourage long lasting burning. I need not say the stink and air pollution it will cause is undesirable, but I'm writing as he dictates.

    Good luck from ones who understand!
     
  4. thedonkeyman

    thedonkeyman Well-Known Member

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    Small size trees with taller stumps. Its a leverage thing. Hook to the top and pull. Use a couple of double blocks to get max amount of pull. When under pressure cut roots, be cautious. Eye protection, hard hat etc.
     
  5. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Three foot diameter is huge. You'd need dynamite.

    My suggestion is find a neighbor with a back hoe or dozer and pay him to do the job. It will be done in a few hours. I just had a dozen pulled on my property. It took all of an hour. I had a total of 8 hours work and you may not find the same reasonable rate that I did ($25/hr), but even at $60 an hour you'll be thankful for the work you won't have to do.

    If you live in the southern part of the country, termite land, it is important to remove the stumps anywhere near your house or future house. It is quite common for the termites to follow the roots. The roots often are more dense around plumbing and will lead the termites directly to the house. One of the things a good termite inspector looks for is tree stumps near the house.
     
  6. 3SistersFarm

    3SistersFarm Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Bresias's post above except in using a chainsaw; dirt and chainsaws don't mix very well. I used a sawzaw on my 4ft plus stump, Tiger brand worked better than my Milwaukee. LOts of blades too, I recommend buying the contractor pack of blades with the biggest teeth and longest blade. Patience, dig, cut, dig... repeat.
    After I removed the stump my neighbor suggested I spay paint my stump gold and put it in my front yard as a trophy because it was such an accomplishment. It did look like an art form, LOL.
     
  7. Bresias

    Bresias Restless User

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    The dirt/chainsaw mix is very bad, yes. Even if you dig out around the stump, you run the risk. We weren't too unhappy about a little of the stump (maybe less than two inches) sticking up, as long as it was flat, but everyone has difference aesthetic tastes or needs.

    You used a TIGER SAW??? Lordy, you must have shaken your teeth loose. How did your shoulders stay in their sockets?? Or your eyeballs?? I am a small female, so I don't have a lot of endurance with those things.

    I am not worthy. :D
     
  8. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    An old farmer told me this one. Set fire to the stump once it gets roaring cover the whole thing with a mound of dried horse manure this creates a reduction burn, he said that the stumps would smolder all winter long, but by plowing time, the stumps, roots and all were gone.
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Hire yourself out digging ditches, take the income and hire a track hoe to dig out the big stumps. You will come out ahead doing this. :) All joking aside, it is hardly feasible for an individual to tackle this task if you have lots of stumps without major track equipment. The best alternative is to let the stumps start to rot on their own. You can pasture around the stumps and time will take care of the stump problem. After a few years of rotting the expense to remove the residual stump is minimal as compared to a fresh cut stump. I have cleared many acres and I have a Cat 955L and I take my own advice. Let'em rot for a while. Do not let the sprouts live, graze them off or spray.
     
  10. rickd203

    rickd203 Well-Known Member

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    It depends on the situation but I usually burn them out. I start by digging out around the base of the stump and drilling holes in the stump to help the fire get in. I usually use firewood to burn the stump charcoal works just as well.
     
  11. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely true. I run heavy equipment for a living and can think of few other tasks a human could undertake that would be such a complete and absolute waste of time.

    If you are absolutely bent on digging them out with mammal power, at least let a couple of pigs do it for you. Their labor is free, just keep drilling 2” holes around the stump and fill them with corn or sweat grain.

    Pete
     
  12. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i have the same problem. Could a 4 wheel drive truck pull it up you think?
     
  13. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    The easiest way is to get a big rope up high and pull over, then the stump comes right out. Or, if you have a lot, then get a CAT to push them over and pile.

    Or, if only stumps, and you have lots, then get a CAT with a CUTTER blade first, then a piler. Then PILE. Then BURN. Then RE-PILE. And BURN again. Then break with a breaking plow, pulled by a big tractor or CAT. Then pick roots. BURN roots. Then Disc, harrow. Then seed to grain. Then seed to grain and hay the next year. Then cut hay.

    [​IMG]
    This is the second step. CAT with piler.

    [​IMG]
    Third step re-pile and burn again.

    [​IMG]
    Then you BREAK the raw land and stumps with a breaking plow. You BREAK the stumps with this method. Then some get rolled under ground to rot and fertilize the ground, and some get rolled out as ROOTS.

    [​IMG]
    Pick ROOTS after breaking

    [​IMG]
    Then you get a nice crop of OATS the first year.

    Too much time on my hands, this New Years Day.

    Happy New Year, and all the best for 2006,

    Alex
     
  14. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you want to save money and have lots of time, drill some half inch holes, six to nine inches deep, in them about four inches apart and fill with dirt. Over two years, they will become rotten due to the bacteria in the soil you put in the holes. Keeping them wet helps. After two years, set them on fire by piling twigs, sticks, or other trash around them and they'll be gone in a week. Thing is, no matter what you do or what removal method you choose, where ever there was a stump, there will be a hole that must be filled with something. Plan on two yards of dirt for a three foot stump. Someone said it above, but if they are close to a house or future house, don't use this method as the termites will find your house.
     
  15. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    with out heavy equipment you dont have many options that dont incluide tons of hard manual labor. I have dug around roots with a shovel, choped the roots with an axe, and continued this process intill I could roll the stump out of the ground with a chain and my pick up truck.
     
  16. silverbackMP

    silverbackMP Well-Known Member

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    Similar method. Drill the holes and fill with nitrogen based fertilizer. Sprinkle a bunch on top. Wait a couple of years and they will be so rotten from bacterial decay, they will easily dig out in very little time with a shovel or heavy duty hoe.
     
  17. Country Lady

    Country Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have read some place that when setting stumps on fire and letting them smolder, the smoldering can run underground and set trees on fire and cause a forest fire. Any truth to this? We'll have numerous stumps, if we can ever get all the trees cut up. All this thanks to Katrina.
     
  18. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Country Lady, that is IMO an old wives tale. A person should not be burning unless the conditions are correct for not letting the fire spread. Last winter I burned 40 plus acres and my biggest problem was keeping the fire going, even above ground. Once I did get the soggy piles hot they burned OK and the fire smoldered for more than 30 days however.
     
  19. poppy

    poppy Guest

    For large or many stumps, hire somone with equipment. For a few low stumps, I take a cordless drill and drill verticle holes in them and fill the holes with diesel fuel. If the stump is dead it will soak in in a day or 2. Fill them again and repeat a couple more times. Them put some charcoal on the top and light it.