Stuck Grain Bin

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jena, Apr 29, 2004.

  1. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    The unloading auger on my bin won't work. Well, it works, but the corn won't come out.

    We've tried poking around in there with a rod, beating on the stupid thing with a hammer, using creative language in an effort to get the bin to cooperate, etc. No luck.

    The corn is in decent shape, but not perfect. I did get a bit of moldy corn out of there before the thing quit, but that was just a small portion in otherwise good corn.

    It's a 6000 bushel bin, darn near completely full. I really, really don't want to have to unload the whole thing by the door, but it's starting to look that way....

    Any ideas?

    Jena
     
  2. jena,

    I can't help with the auger, the only thing I know about grain bins are I've been eyeing an empty one on my parents farm for hay storage.

    But, in searching the web for help for you I ran across this and thought you might get a laugh out of it .

    Hope you get it fixed soon,

    Mel-

    Murphy's Corn Growing Laws


    Your worst looking field will always be next to the paved road used by your banker and most of your neighbours.

    Machinery never breaks down when you don't really need it.

    Unloading augers break only when the combine bin is completely full.

    If both the monitor and the planter are going to breakdown, they will do so simultaneously.

    The most essential parts are always on back-order.

    A nut dropped on the ground will roll until it finds a crack to fall into.
    Corollary: The more you need the nut, the deeper and narrower the crack will be.

    The tool you need is back at the shop.

    The more work you have to get done, the more likely it is to rain.

    It never hails on bare ground.

    Following a summer-long drought, the rainfall received during harvest will be equivalent to twice the accumulated moisture deficit for the entire growing season.

    Mud-holes are deeper than they look.

    The nozzle behind the sprayer tank will be the first one to plug.

    When you can't discover the cause of a breakdown, all of the free advice you get will be for things you've already checked.

    The field that most needs manure is the one farthest from the barn.

    When you mistakenly plant at too high a population, every seed will grow.

    Nails are selectively attracted to the inside dual.

    Weeds are the only plants that thrive in miserable weather.

    The twitchgrass is always greener on your side of the fence.

    Problem weeds appear first at the back end of the field you visit least.
    Corollary: You won't see them until the seeds have gone through the combine.

    The number of salesmen that will call on you on any given day will be directly proportional to the amount and urgency of the work you have to get done.
    Corollary: None of them will be selling anything you want.

    Weed escapes increase exponentially once the corn is too big to cultivate.

    Corn borers are selectively attracted to the hybrid with the weakest stalks.

    Spray drift is selectively attracted to soybean fields.

    Coulters never fall off on the headlands.

    The last round to be plowed next to the line fence is always one furrow narrower than the plow.

    Stones get bigger at night.

    Tires never go flat when the gravity wagon is empty.

    The futures market will go up the limit the day after you sell.

    If you stop for a beer, after having been in the field since 5 a.m., the first person you see will be: a) your banker b) your minister or c) your mother-in-law.

    The only person your family pet ever bites will be: a) your banker b) your minister or c) the local animal control officer.

    If your hired man spreads fertilizer on the wrong field, he will put it on one that already tests "Excessive".

    Cattle never break out while you're watching.
    Corollary: You'll find them in the field you entered in the crop competition.

    The announcement of the one meeting you most wanted to attend will arrive in the mail the day after the event.

    The field that most needs lime will be the one you've just converted to no-till.

    The day you let your cousin from the city fuel up your biggest tractor will be the day after the dealer put gasoline in the diesel tank.

    On the hottest day of the year, the air conditioner on your tractor will break down, the heater will be stuck on "High", and all of the windows will be seized shut.

    On the coldest day of the year, the heater will break down, the air conditioner will be stuck on "High" and the windows will be seized open.
     

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Call the manufacturer and ask if they have any particular words of wisdom.

    Ken S. in WC TN
     
  4. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sometimes the grain, silage, etc. gets hung up and won't funnel into the auger. Used to scare me silly when the men had to crawl into a filled silo to break things loose. We're always reading about someone being sucked down into a bin or buried in grain so be very careful -- grain can kill. Many newbee's are unaware of the dangers. Never never never let your kids play in grain.
     
  5. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I'm very aware of the dangers. My husband was in there poking around and it made me very nervous. I will only go in if I have a rope on me and someone else is there. He kept saying as long as it wasn't running, it wasn't a problem, but there could be a bridge down there or something.

    Our last option is to remove the auger and see if we can break loose whatever is blocking it. Of course, if we are successful, the grain will flow right into the auger housing making it impossible to get the auger back in :/

    I think we're just going to have to rent a vaccum and take a few truck loads out and see if we can get it. I'd better go check corn prices...

    Jena
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Jena, do you have access to one of the small straight portable augers that are common place on many older farms? If so, you can usually go thru the sampling panel inside the exterior door. Typically one of the inner bolt in panels has an access door. Grain will not run out when you open the access panel. I am not stating to remove the bolt in panel. Insert the portable auger and extract the corn.
     
  7. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    There is no access at all through that door unless I remove a panel. Hubby is amazed and trust me....I've heard how stupid the set up is in very creative terms lately!

    He's thinking of cutting a hole to put an auger in, but I'm kind of against that idea. I wonder if we got a bucket truck and just stuck an auger in the top if that would work. We wouldn't have to rent anything and we could position is where we want it....but then it would end up getting buried, full and stuck too.

    Darn, this is a headache. Maybe I ought to just put some chickens in there and check back in a few years...

    Jena
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Jena, my vote is with the hubby. I would cut a hole in one of the panels behind the main door. Additionally, I would make an adapter from a short piece of pipe/tubing that has a ID slightly larger than the portable auger I would be using to extract the corn . I would have this adapter already built and premounted to the panel before I cut the hole. With the adapter not mounted I would saw the hole into the panel and be ready to mount the adapter. You may have to ram a plug into the hole to hold back the corn as you mount the adapter. If you have designed the adapter with the tube angled upward the corn should cease to flow once it is in place. You can start the auger into the hole and with the auger running you should be able to force it into the bin to where it will feed corn out.
     
  9. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You've already thought of the vac, but can you loosen the unloading auger and pull it out a little? you should be able to push it back in by turning it on and pushing it back. Kind of depends on the configuration! Odd idea but a longish pipe hooked up to a compressor might bore its way down to the unloader and break up any bridging. Might take a good sized compressor though.
     
  10. Ducks limited

    Ducks limited Member

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    Try using a sewer tape to break up the spoiled corn where the auger has to go. You could rent a "roto-rooter" with a bit smaller than the tube the auger goes in but if it gets caught on the tube you are sunk for sure.
    Does the unloading auger have a tube around it? If yes, try taking the worm out and use it (by hand) in the bin to work the spoiled grain out. This may be your best shot of getting the hole opened up.
    One last shot would be to go in the inspection hole with a rod or a small auger worm and try to drive it towards the center to break up the spoiled corn from above.
    If you have to resort to the auger in the inspection hole, try to get the auger as close to the center as possible. Unloading a bin from only one side puts a lot of pressure on the back side and the bin can collapse. Good Luck. This can be very frustrating.
     
  11. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I'll give all these to my husband and see what he thinks.

    Thanks

    Jena