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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I'm about to come into possession of a Woodmizer LT40 Hyd. I'm interested in what others with sawmills have done in the way of a structure to protect the sawmill from rain. Also, there is a reasonable chance any structure I build will end up with solar panels mounted on the roof so it will need to be able to support that weight. We're in East Texas so no snow load here. Except for last month.

Thanks for your help.
Brian
 

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I bought my LT40Hyd used---the Owner bought it new in 95 and from that day to the day I sold it in 2017 is lived in the yard, sure the paint dulled but the sawmill worked great. BUT I have seen them set-up under a 1 sided--other side open shed and most all the logs brought to it. I went to the logs.
 

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The mill I used to cut lumber for my house is 24x32x 16’ high
the mill has 3 doors one on the end to load logs in and it’s open on both sides with windows around .
No power
it cuts 20’ logs but the door is 16 feet
it’s full of lumber cut offs
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The mill I used to cut lumber for my house is 24x32x 16’ high
the mill has 3 doors one on the end to load logs in and it’s open on both sides with windows around .
No power
it cuts 20’ logs but the door is 16 feet
it’s full of lumber cut offs
Thanks.
What did you use for a header that can support the roof over a 16' wide door? That's the part I'm struggling with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought my LT40Hyd used---the Owner bought it new in 95 and from that day to the day I sold it in 2017 is lived in the yard, sure the paint dulled but the sawmill worked great. BUT I have seen them set-up under a 1 sided--other side open shed and most all the logs brought to it. I went to the logs.
Thanks.
I'm starting to lean this way and then just build something just for the solar panels.
 

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Hello,
I'm about to come into possession of a Woodmizer LT40 Hyd. I'm interested in what others with sawmills have done in the way of a structure to protect the sawmill from rain. Also, there is a reasonable chance any structure I build will end up with solar panels mounted on the roof so it will need to be able to support that weight. We're in East Texas so no snow load here. Except for last month.

Thanks for your help.
Brian
A three sided shed, faced so it is shaded all day.
 

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It’s a pole building with trusses the 16’ door is on the gable end so there is no header needed
there is a 6x10 across at door hight to hold the door 10th high door .
The poles are set at 8’ on the rest of the building .
the poles have 2x12 s around the top of the building bolted inside and out .
The farmer has a Mt 50
 

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Hello,
I'm about to come into possession of a Woodmizer LT40 Hyd. I'm interested in what others with sawmills have done in the way of a structure to protect the sawmill from rain. Also, there is a reasonable chance any structure I build will end up with solar panels mounted on the roof so it will need to be able to support that weight. We're in East Texas so no snow load here. Except for last month.

Thanks for your help.
Brian
I have roof over mill. No sides on the posts. All open so the sawdust can be blowed out one side. I have fans that blow the dust away from me while sawing. Allso makes for easy loading. I cut mostly large sq. posts 14x14 inch. sq. by 20 ft long. People that buy them treat them and cut the post to the length for jobs. I also cut post up to 18 inches sq. from my larger trees.
 

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Most sheds I've seen are open at least on one side to allow logs to come in on that side. Most are like mine, at ground level, and often, like mine, they've built a log deck to hold several to a dozen or so logs to roll in on the mill bed.



I didn't use a header...I simply built a king post truss with the king post over the center wall of the shed and the rest cantilevered out over the mill. It's stood for 30 years now like that, though a heavy snow in the 90's did buckle the center a bit.

If you look at the roof here, you can see a little dip in the center.



I threw this shed up in a hurry (sawed the lumber and nailed it up right off the saw). I'm in the process of building a much better shed right now. I decided this common design is really wrong.....the mill should sit below grade if possible so you don't have to raise logs UP to deck, which at times has been an issue with really big logs and my tractor front loader.

So my new building will sit off to one side of the mill area where I have a down slope grade. This is a sketch of the concept.





This is the actual building start, a slab below grade the depth of the mill bed, a block retainer wall on the log entry side. There will be a couple of 6x6 steel beams for the log deck that will extend over the block wall. I also am including provisions this time for dust removal. Before, I'd let it build up a couple feet against that center wall, then shovel for an hour into bucket loads on the tractor bucket, and move off from the mill.

NOW I'm mounting a small (8"x20') grain conveyor under the floor that will convey the dust out the back of the building to a pile. That black metal grate mounted in the concrete will be the mill end of the conveyor....simply sweep the dust in the conveyor from time to time and flip it on. There will be an 8'x24' work room on the right side of the mill building (reason for the footer trenches in photo) and the conveyor will go under the floor of the work room and out the back side, dumping the dust on down the grade.



Future photos to follow.
 

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We bought a Woodmizer LT50HD in 2010 or so to make our own lumber. We have plenty of Doug Fir to work with and its on a north facing side of a canyon so it grows slow with tight rings. Its heavy and quite hard. The mill has been outside the whole time and the worst consequence is the fuel and coolant tanks have failed due to UV and the paint has dulled. I have slit feed bags to cover the tanks and held down with the bungies and that helped. The weather and UV hasn't affected any of the mechanicals, hydraulics or even the console/wiring. I never cover the engine or the console as I don't want to trap the moisture under a wrap. I have pondered a roof but the area is already tight enough to work in and would rather have dull paint than to work around support posts. With it in the open its really convenient to get the 'lil Kubota close to remove and pile all the saw dust.

The worst problem I have is the unit's frame with all the access holes and openings - it is a yellow jacket haven every summer and boy do they get angry when the unit runs!

What I did spend time on was a very heavy duty racking system in the shop for stickering and binding down the cut lumber for curing straight as possible. Sure I lost some shop space but it was sure worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
T
We bought a Woodmizer LT50HD in 2010 or so to make our own lumber. We have plenty of Doug Fir to work with and its on a north facing side of a canyon so it grows slow with tight rings. Its heavy and quite hard. The mill has been outside the whole time and the worst consequence is the fuel and coolant tanks have failed due to UV and the paint has dulled. I have slit feed bags to cover the tanks and held down with the bungies and that helped. The weather and UV hasn't affected any of the mechanicals, hydraulics or even the console/wiring. I never cover the engine or the console as I don't want to trap the moisture under a wrap. I have pondered a roof but the area is already tight enough to work in and would rather have dull paint than to work around support posts. With it in the open its really convenient to get the 'lil Kubota close to remove and pile all the saw dust.

The worst problem I have is the unit's frame with all the access holes and openings - it is a yellow jacket haven every summer and boy do they get angry when the unit runs!

What I did spend time on was a very heavy duty racking system in the shop for stickering and binding down the cut lumber for curing straight as possible. Sure I lost some shop space but it was sure worth it.
Thanks. I've decided to give up on the idea of building something to cover the mill.
 

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Nope, You are not the first to say they do well out in the weather.
My mill has 20 ft. bed. So i can cut long lumber. I build a roof over my mill when i first got it. The weather will sure mess up the whole set-up unless it has a roof over it. Got a friend that had one in the open for 20 years. It still runs but sure is a mess. Really good to have roof over mill so you can run it in all kinds of weather. Also build a large building to dry the timber in. Makes for fast and easy drying to avoid weather and helps to dry lumber faster with fans running air over the lumber. Just make sure lumber is stacked right with space between layers. Have two men that help with my lumber business. The two cut down trees and haul logs in close to the mill for easy loading with my log loader. The men saw the lumber while i do other things.
 
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