"Strong" smelling pork.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by stef, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. stef

    stef Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,835
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Location:
    N.W. PA
    Our grocers have really been selling pork for cheap recently. Must be to offset the high price of beef.

    So...I bought a nice package of ribs. They smelled fine when I cut them apart and froze them. However, I cooked a portion the other day and the aroma was very, very strong. 'Gamy' almost. It was not spoiled, and it tasted fine, but the odor was really something.

    I plan on pre-cooking the rest in salted water before I prepare it for whatever recipe and I think that will get rid of some of the unpleasant odor.

    Any thoughts on why it might have had that strong smell?

    Again...it was totally fresh and I ate it with no ill effects.

    ??

    stef
     
  2. Goldie

    Goldie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    146
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Sounds like it could have been a boar. That meat is sometimes rank.
     

  3. stef

    stef Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,835
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Location:
    N.W. PA
    Do you mean a male pig?
     
  4. nappy

    nappy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    940
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Location:
    Michigan..NWLower
    Had that happen to me once. I bought a pork roast and cut it in half freezing part of it for later. When I cooked the first piece, it tasted rank...so tossed that and the frozen piece. I know it was wasteful but I'd been reading of the "awful stuff" that had been fed to pigs around that time so didn't want to take a chance. :hrm:
     
  5. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,604
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    A boar is an intact male pig.
     
  6. stef

    stef Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,835
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Location:
    N.W. PA
    As I said earlier, it did not taste bad. It smelled very strong when it was cooking.

    It did not smell bad when I was cutting it into portions. If it had, for sure I would have pitched it.
     
  7. unregistered65598

    unregistered65598 Guest

    Messages:
    2,043
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    First may I say that being a butcher, please don't just toss it. It it smells off and you don't like it, please take it back if you can for a refund or exchange. It is god awfully embarrassing when people bring things back, but I would want the chance if given to correct it. As for the off smell while cooking, but not before I am not sure about. Did you thaw it correctly? Thats the only reason I can think of for it not smelling right.
     
  8. hotzcatz

    hotzcatz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,856
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2007
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Meat can taste different depending on the animals age, gender and diet. Then you get into how it was slaughtered and how the meat was handled afterwards. THEN, you get into recipes, marinades and everything else done to it in the cooking process. It is rather amazing how consistent the flavors of the commercial meats are when you consider how many variables there are out there.

    The local consensus around here is if it's an older boar, it's dog food. But that's also because more than likely the other pig they caught was a young tender sow, so I don't know how far we should trust that advice.
     
  9. oregon woodsmok

    oregon woodsmok Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,336
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Boar meat. It smells bad when cooking, but tastes fine and won't hurt you.
     
  10. Old John

    Old John Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,892
    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    Umm-hunnh..........That's why you have garlic, curry powder, Cajun seasoning, and other fragrant herbs & spices in your larder. It improves the smell & taste of a rank, old Boar. And, you don't have to waste the meat.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2011
  11. stef

    stef Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,835
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Location:
    N.W. PA
    Thanks, everyone. I think I will just pre-boil it in some salted water first and then cook it as ususal.

    The strong odor kind of threw me, but it tasted okay, and I know it isn't spoiled.

    Just wondered if anyone else had ever encountered this.
     
  12. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    ozark foothills, Mo
    Maybe you are preggy!:hysterical:
     
  13. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,325
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Location:
    Carthage, Texas
    Some folks think boar hog meat don't stink...

    All I can say is some folks sniffers aren't hardwired properly.

    I 'can' turn my nose off, when necessary, but prefer not to do that when its something I'm eating. I've slaughtered a few boars, everything from shoats on up, and all of them to a T, stank like boiling urine. Yummm.... boiled urine... Might expect that smell if I were cooking kidneys, but not a whole hog and every part on it.

    Selling an old or not needed boar hog used to not be worth hauling to the sale barn... after hauling, auction fees, and other 'bills', the hog might bring a couple of bucks. My uncle stopped carrying... a 400lb boar would bring him 5 to 10 bucks, take home money. Of course, once the nasty beast meat makes it to market, it's priced like good pork.
     
  14. lemonthyme7

    lemonthyme7 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,093
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2010
    Location:
    NW PA
    I agree with the smell of boar meat. We had one that had got crippled in its back legs and my parents butchered it. While there was nothing wrong with the meat I had a hard time eating it because of the smell when it was cooking. My SIL who was pregnant at the time couldn't even come in the house if mom was cooking it because the smell made her so sick!
     
  15. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,769
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont, Zone 3
    Boar taint is a bit more complicated than that. About 25% of people can't smell it BUT the vast majority of boar pigs don't have taint AND taint is caused by many factors including genetics, feed, management and exposure. Not only that but bad killing, poor bleed out, improper storage, etc can all cause spoilage that gets blamed on boar taint.

    Maybe it is boar taint. Maybe it is spoilage. Maybe it is stress hormones from a bad kill. Hard to tell across the net without smelling it.
     
  16. oregon woodsmok

    oregon woodsmok Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,336
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    The old boars who went to market used to end up at the sausage factory. Now, with pork so high at the market, maybe a few processors are seeing a lot of $ in a hog that they paid 5 cents a pound for and can sell for $2.45 a pound.

    After all, there is no way for the consumer to trace the meat back to them. As the decades go by, there is less honor and more sense of being clever when getting away with cheating the system.
     
  17. Use Less

    Use Less Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,867
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Location:
    western New York State
    What they already said, plus ,maybe old enough that the fat had gone rancid?
     
  18. wogglebug

    wogglebug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,623
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    I'm sure it was boar taint.
    I'm sure it would be possible for people to pass on the occasional boar to be sold as good pork, particularly if they were selling to a mass-market outlet where the bad consumer reaction wouldn't find its way back to the supplier.
    However, maybe (giving the benefit of the doubt) it wasn't from an obvious boar. Some males can have undescended testicles. There's nothing there to be got with castration, and the animal is useless for breeding, but the glands are still pumping out the hormones that make a male, and that would include boar taint. Wouldn't speak well of the meat inspection at that killing plant, since it should be obvious, but it would be possible.
     
  19. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,325
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Location:
    Carthage, Texas
    There's a project for a budding entrepreneur... have a usb powered smell generator... I could see it working great, till some juvenile hacker learned how to use it for juvenile purposes... imagine getting an email that says "pull my finger"...:yuck:
     
  20. stef

    stef Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,835
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Location:
    N.W. PA
    I did a little research and it appears that, although males are the primary 'culprits' of boar taint, female hormones can also occasionally inject a strong odor to pork meat.

    That being said, I reiterate, the meat was not spoiled.

    Today I did what I said I'd do: pre-cooked it in a little salt water; took the meat off the bones and made 8 pints of soup in the pressure canner. It came out fine.

    There was some extra I cooked up right away and the flavor was good and clean.


    So...that's my experience. :)


    p.s. after thawing, the meat also had less odor this time around...I'm thinking freezing it somehow worked to neutralize the odor