strange finding on a soil test (and what to do about it?)

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by cindyc, Apr 27, 2006.

  1. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    Decided to wait and play with the soil a bit more before putting in my plants since I garden organically.

    I have extremely clay soil, and need to augment it to work with it. Even after having the big Kuboda come and till it for me down to a very low depth, there are still big clumps of clay in it and it gets VERY hard when completely dry.

    However, the ph is 6.0 - not too acidic, not too alkaline.

    It was slightly low on phosphorus, ABSOLUTELY DEPLETED on nitrogen, and (according to the test) had WAY TOO MUCH Potash.

    Now, I know I can add organic things to increas nitrogen and phosphorus, but how does one REDUCE potash in a garden?

    Also, how do I augment this soil in terms of workability without messing up the good Ph?

    (BTW, I am in Zone 7, and really should be planing in the next week or two. I know I should have done this in the fall, but we moved here in late winter/early spring.)

    Thanks for any suggestions you may have.
    Cindy
     
  2. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can't really remove it, but your plants will and so will adding compost. The usual recommendation is not to add any more until the levels drop, but some farmers add as much as the new crop will use. I would ammend with compost, plant stuff and see what happens. If you did a home test remember it could be off by quite a bit.
     

  3. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    I have pretty similar soil to yours. Except that mine is loaded with Phosphorus instead of Potassium. I just make sure that I don't use any fertilizers that will add to it. I use fertilizers that are almost all nitrogen (blood meal, fish emulsion, etc.). I wouldn't be so sure you actually have a problem unless your plants end up having problems that can be attributed to excess Potassium.
     
  4. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! I added composted manure, peat moss, and humus. I added organic blood meal and bone meal to take care of any deficits. We will see what happens...

    The good news is that the soil is actually workable now. It was a home test, too, so maybe the levels of potash were not off by so much as it appeared.

    Thanks for all the help.

    Cindyc.