Stoves

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by logcabn, Oct 11, 2005.

  1. logcabn

    logcabn Well-Known Member

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    We are thinking of getting a new stove, and I would like some input. Propane or electric, I like propane but hubby thinks that it would be more expensive than electric. And if any of you know approx. how much propane a stove for cooking would go through in a month that would be a big help. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    GO for propane. Get one of the new flat tops if you can afford it. Propane stoves go forever on a little propane. I have propane furnace (backup) propane water heater,propane stove. i went for over two years on 400 gal of propane. If it wasn't for using the furnace when it gets real cold I know I could get 3-4 years out of a tank. And you don't have to wait for it to heat up. :goodjob:
     

  3. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    We prefer propane for a number of reasons. As TNHermit said, you don't have to wait for it to get hot. For another, you can cook when the power is off. There are 12 of us and my wife does a TON of canning. Two hundred gallons will last us just about a year.
     
  4. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree with getting propane. We bought a gas range and converted it to propane. Cooking with gas/propane is FAR better than with electricity. But I thought only electric ranges could be flat top. How do they make a gas stove with a flat glass top?
     
  5. Terri in WV

    Terri in WV Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm another vote for propane. I don't like cooking on elec and if the elec goes out for any length of time you're up a creek. It will put out a lot of heat in the winter if the furnace or elec goes out. I have a 100# tank that I've filled once since last august which equals $112(and that was with using the stove to help heat the house when the furnace went out for a week).
     
  6. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Propane. It is so much better to cook on than electric.

    Ideally I would get a propane cook top and an electric oven or an electric convection oven. I don't like gas for an oven especially if you do a lot of baking. For regular old roasting meat and such it isn't a big deal but for baked goods gas isn't optimal.
     
  7. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well here's a vote for electric. Easy enough to cook on once you get used to it (the oven has a much more even heat). No running out of gas, no propane smell, no gas leaks to worry about, easier to clean, and initial cost is less. We do have a wood stove back up to cook on so that's not an issue for us.

    The only negative to the electric I see is if you get depressed and stick your head in the oven the most your going to get is a hot head :)
     
  8. logcabn

    logcabn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys your input is great, I just called and priced propane for our area $1.137 a liter and tank rental is 80 bucks a year. I think hubby is going to win. I was wondering if a stove could be hooked up to barbeque tanks and when you run out you just switch tanks. This stove if I get propane will make the move to the cabin with us when we move there and it is a pack it in spot no fill up truck would even make it close. Plus you allways need the option of sticking your head in the oven.
     
  9. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You are so right Quint. In my previous home in Arizona I had a Dacor "dual fuel" range, one of those great hulking stainless steel things. Gas burners on top, and an electric convection oven. It obviously wouldn't work for us up here (off the grid) but I miss it. {sob} It was wonderful. :)
     
  10. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    I love my electric for all the reasons someone else had said. Also, i love the
    smooth top stoves.

    Our new stove (electric) on order for new house is:
    Frigidaire® 30-Inch Freestanding Self Clean Electric Range w/SpeedBake™ Convection System (Color: White)
    Item #: 169223 Model: FEFLM605DSa Frigidaire with a smooth top

    It has the smooth top, convection oven (large) and instead of a pan drawer, it has a drawer/oven that can be used to cook cookies, pies, and whatnot.
    It is expensive though - they have it at Lowes ~$1,000


    Cooking is my thing and it one of my few upgrades in our new house. I had a smooth top kitchenaid at our old house with a regular oven and liked that as well, but it wasn't all that cheap. I have found with appliances you get what you pay for.

    Good luck in your choice.
     
  11. logcabn

    logcabn Well-Known Member

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    You had no prpblems with the smooth top. I have had people tell me that if they had it to do over again that they would not get a smooth top, and I have also heard that smooth tops have a problem with sugar and since I like to make candy that may be a problem.
     
  12. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    "I was wondering if a stove could be hooked up to barbeque tanks and when you run out you just switch tanks."

    Sure you can. Just tell the dealer what you want to do and he'll fix you up with the right connections, etc.
     
  13. Abuelo in TX

    Abuelo in TX Active Member

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    Another vote for propane here. My water canner says not to use on a flat top stove so if you can you might want to take that in consideration
     
  14. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    I guess to each his own. Me......I'd never give up my propane. It has been a blessing to me all my life. I guess living in an area where you have ice storms, wind storms etc. that cause power outages, electric doesn't seem like a great option. We have gone as long as two weeks without electricity here and I was the only one in the neighborhood besides the Amish that could cook inside and it was a darn cold thing for folks to have to be cooking outside on grills etc. If all you are going to do is cook with it, you don't need one of those great big tanks and a delivery truck wouldn't need to get to you. There are some tall cylinders that hold enough to last several months. Before we used it to heat our hot water and all I did was cook with it, one would last me about three months. We had two tanks and when we switched over to the second tank, we took the first one to get filled.
     
  15. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You do have to be careful of what range you get with propane though. Most now require electricity to heat the "glow bar" in the oven. Once the glow bar is hot enough, it opens the valve to let the gas in. Since we are on solar power, a glow bar was not an option for us. It was hard to find a self cleaning oven that didn't have the cursed flow bar. The cook top would work in a power outage (you might have to light it with a match if the ignitor is electric), but not the oven. We finally dound the range to fit our needs at Sears. I had several appliance stores tell me it couldn't be found!
     
  16. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    Wow......thanks for that info Lisa!!!!!!! I am very grateful to know that as my old stove is really needing to be replaced before hubby retires. I wouldn't have known the new ones require electricity!! Sears still has one though??
     
  17. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can buy a gas stove (without the self cleaning option) that requires no electricity pretty easily at Home Depot or Lowes. I just can't stand cleaning ovens! :eek: My range is a Kenmore, it does take power to run the clock and light up thingies on the backsplash, but not much. It also requires a small amount to fire up the oven (stupid). But not much so we can use it with our solar power and batteries. I've heard the glowbar thing is something that was instituted by our ever-caring government to save us ignorant consumers from gassing ourselves. Dunno. Luckily, we never lose power in storms or otherwise since we supply our own. I can gloat about that at least since unlike our friends on the grid, we have to be so careful of our useage!
     
  18. JennDBass

    JennDBass Wannab crunchy mama

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    Another thing you might want to think about... It is harder to fry things with electric... You just don't get the same heat. Propane burns a little hotter and makes crispier hush puppies... now if you are constantly burning stuff... electric might be a better thought.
     
  19. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    :)
    My daughter has an electric range and everybody agrees her food is fit for the Gods. Burnt Offerings :)