Stove Pipe question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sancraft, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    I have this posted in Shop also.

    I have a wood burning stove that I want to vent through the wall. However the first turn would be only 3 ft of pipe up from the stove. Is that okay? SOmeone said that I couldn't make the first turn less that 6ft up from the stove. Also, is there a brace that I can buy to keep the pipe the proper distance from the edge of the roof and what is the proper distance
     
  2. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i have never heard of a minimum distance above the stove before you can turn ther pipe. i would think that as long as you keep the pipe a safe distance away from the ceiling you should be ok.

    i know they do make brackets that are used to install pipe to the outside of buildings. i know that they make multi-wall insulated pipe as well. i would be using that on the outside.

    there have been several posts on stove pipe here recently. they are all worth searching for and reading. i am sure someone here will be able to give you the proper saftey clearances for stove pipe.
     

  3. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    The more pipe that is inside the cabin, the more radiant heat you will get. You should use, triple wall pipe to go through the wall to keep from burning your place down. You should get recommendations from a stove shop to be SAFE. You don't want to loose everything, when you're sooooooo close.
    You will have stove pipe that bends, i.e. the two elbows to get it through the wall. We found that it is better to extend the height of the pipe,more than the recommended height,past the roof line. It will increase the draft. The draft is effected everytime that you put a curve into the pipe.
     
  4. buck_1one

    buck_1one Well-Known Member

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    I only have about two and a half feet of pipe before it goes into the chiminey. Quite a few years ago I lived in an old farm house that was about 100 yrs old and the wood cook stove was the same way. Only about three feet before it went into the chimney. The only problem I could think of might be that the outside pipe would be colder and you might loose your draft due to the short inside pipe. With me having a chimney the whole thing stays hot and I have a good draft.

    Sorry I can't help with the pipe going through the wall and space specs. I have a real chimney, and it is several feet above the top of the roof. I have seen people run a pipe through a window and the pipe was only maybe less then a foot from the side of the roof. I don't like that idea but their place has yet to burn down.

    Hope this helps a little.
    Buck
     
  5. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    that will be fine and you dont need triple wall pipe double wall is fine just use what they call a thimble when you go through the wall it is a sort of sleeve
     
  6. astrocow

    astrocow Well-Known Member

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    Our only source of heat is a woodstove. We set our stove back a minimum of 18 inches from the wall (manufacturer recommendation). There is a 30 inch pipe going straight up from the stove, an elbow then another straight stretch (that's slightly angled downward towards the stove for cresote to drip back into the stove) to our chimney. A our pipe is insulated from where it leaves the wall and outside. We were told that as soon as the pipe leaves the stove get it outside. In case of chimney fire I'd prefer it catch in the pipe outside.
     
  7. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    I have our stove and pipe from our old house. We have the thimble that ran throught he wall of the old house too. I just wanted to be sure I could install it without having to go through the roof. I'm afraid of heights and working on the roof woudl be terrifying for me. We're going up Wed and Thurs. I will have the stove ready to go before nightfall. I know I'm going to have to go up the ladder and put a bracket at the roofline to hold the pipe in place, but I won't have to leave the ladder. :eek:

    :buds: A double shot Vodka after I come down, should settle my nerves. LOL :sing: