Storing Bleach - Help

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Shepherd, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,499
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    IA
    Quick question - didn't know where I might get the help fastest... I'm trying to reorganize our garage to make room for all my canning. I have several bottles of bleach and I'd like to know if it would be ok to store it in the unheated barn... or will the freezing temperatures wreck it (or cause a mess)?

    We've been storing it in our attached garage (which has temperature control along with the house) and it takes up a lot of space.

    Thanks so much.
     
  2. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

    Messages:
    6,410
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Location:
    Forests of maine
    It will last for a really long time.

    No harm, no foul.
     

  3. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,280
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Appalachian Foothills
    Being that bleach is a liquid, it'll expand if frozen, so make sure the containers have expansion room so they don't split.

    Yes, bleach lasts & lasts...

    PS: Home Depot carries gallon jugs of concentrated bleach. Much, much cheaper than in the store....even cheaper than the dollar store... :)
     
  4. Dink

    Dink Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    581
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I have heard that bleach losses its streigth after about 6 mo and that dry calcium hypochlorite is shelf stable bleach. :shrug:
     
  5. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,499
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    IA
    So the general consensus is - it would be ok to store in the barn, even with freezing temperatures this winter... as long as I pour some of the bleach out (into another container) so there's room for expansion... correct?

    Thank you all so much. I'll be happy to get that outta there! LOL.
     
  6. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

    Messages:
    2,890
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Location:
    NE PA
    Yes, I have also been convinced that bleach loses its effectiveness after 6 months. When doing survival water purification, keep current on bleach. Also, I found that older bleach (a couple years old) doesn't seem to "bleach" clothes like newer stuff. Ann
     
  7. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

    Messages:
    1,617
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Location:
    IL
    Bleach degrades over time and with exposure to light. Make sure you rotate your bottles so you don't keep bottles around forever.

    Kathie
     
  8. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,076
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin.. Zone 5
    Works real well for taking dark stains of wood also. Like a super cheap "deck wash".
    Cover the plants, though.
    Store mine in the shed, didn't seem to hurt it any.
     
  9. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,499
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    IA
    Thanks everybody. Tomorrow I'm moving it out, YEAAAAAaa.... more room in the garage for foodage! LOL

    Now that I have that advice... how long do you feel we should hold onto cooking oils (maximum amount of time)? Can oils be 'revitalized' somehow if they start to turn rank?
     
  10. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,731
    Joined:
    May 31, 2002
    Location:
    No. Cent. AR
    You can freeze cooking oils and extend their life indefinitely as long as they are frozen. Nothing can revitalize rancid oils. Olive oil stays freshest longest though. and bleach does lose it's strength and at about 6 months or so it's not really bleach anymore.
     
  11. jennigrey

    jennigrey Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,967
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Location:
    Washington, USA
    After enduring a couple of cracked bleach bottles and the ensuing disasters I have taken to only keeping one small bottle of bleach with the laundry stuff (I seldom use it) and sitting in a spare dog water bowl. For long-term storage I now keep bleach tablets instead of liquid bleach. I got these tablets at Home Deopot. I think each tablet makes one gallon of bleach and there's several tablets in the package.
     
  12. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    292
    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Location:
    Meade Co Kentucky
    Yes, bleach freezes. The higher the concentration, the lower the temperature it takes to freeze it. The stuff in the grocery stores will freeze at close to the same temperature of water. Here's excerpts from the MSDS sheet chemical properties. The one you were interested in is referred to as "melting point".

    PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE (BLEACH)
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Physical Data
    Boiling Point : ~100-110 C (212-230 F) @ 760 mm Hg
    Decomposes
    Vapor Pressure : Variable
    Vapor Density : ~1 (Air = 1.0)
    For 5% solutions
    Melting Point : ~-26 to 0 C (-15 to 32 F) For 12.5% to 5%
    solutions
    Evaporation Rate : ~1 (Ether = 1)
    Solubility in Water : 100 WT%
    pH : @ 20 C (68 F) for >7% pH decreases with
    concentration
    Odor : Pungent-like chlorine
    Form : Liquid
    Color : Clear light green, yellow
    Specific Gravity : 1.021 @ 15C (59F)
    % Volatiles : Variable-water vapor+product of
    decomposition.

    Other Hazards
    Sodium hypochlorite reacts violently with amines and
    ammonium salts. Solutions are reactive with many common
    cleaning products such as toilet bowl cleaners, rust
    removers, vinegar, acids, organics and ammonia products to
    produce hazardous gases such as chlorine and other
    chlorinated species.