Stopping a dog from jumping up!

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by DixyDoodle, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Any tips on stopping a dog from jumping up?

    I thought we would be over this by now with our lab pup---she is now 1 year old. We cured our other dogs of it by making them sit before we would show them attention, but this one is just not getting it. She jumps around so much, just getting her settled enough to sit is a battle. We've also tried ignoring her, turning our backs, but she just bounds around us and still goes at it! Ditto for the putting up a knee so they can't make body contact. None of it is working!

    Maybe we just need to try something different. HELP!

    DD

    PS> I have also thought of attaching a small leash that we could step on if she jumps---if she can keep from chewing the leash apart! It's not an issue of exercise, we also have a border collie (!) and they both get their exercise! LOL Maybe it's just an extended puppy phase....I hope.
     
  2. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    You might try this ~ catch both front paws and pat her and baby talk her in a praising tone.. all the while stepping on her back paws rather firmly and not letting her paws go until she pulls away.

    By not yelling at her, she won't feel that she was in trouble, but if she is fairly bright, she'll decide it's not worth the pain.
     

  3. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    I dont know if it will help but we used to put our knee out when one of our dogs would jump up on us, that way they could not make contact with their front paws and would go right back down. We also used to let them jump up and then step on their rear toes, not too hard, but hard enough to get their attention and they would get right down without being yelled at.
     
  4. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    Our pup was more than 5 mo when we got him and the only way to get attention at his old house was to jump up for it. We got down to his level to show affection. Once he got past the initial "I'm so thrilled to see you, haven't seen you in a year," then we'd have him sit to get the remaining attention. Sounds like we were catering to him but it certainly broke the habit along with a sharp "NO" when he did jump. He's really doing very well now and rarely jumps. It has been about 2 months or less. Sounds like yours is a little more high strung so it might really take some time! I like the stepping on the toes idea. Anything to make it not worth while or just to break her cycle, change her habit. If you can catch her off guard with the knee and knock her off her feet, that is often effective but it sounds like that isn't working. Good luck!
     
  5. TwoAcresAndAGoat

    TwoAcresAndAGoat Well-Known Member

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    Attach a light rope (cotton cloths line works) about 5 - 6 feet long to a buckle collar.

    When your dog come to greet you step on the rope. He will be fine unless he tries to jump up. When he jumps up he will get a correction automaticall when he hits the end of the rope on his way up.

    {You want the rope to be long enough that you can easily find it and walk up it towards your dog's collar. Stop when your foot is holding the rope loose when you dog is on all four. If you are not talented enought to do this then you can pickup the end of the rope in your hand and then step on it. Make sure the rope is long enough that the dog does not feel any pressure on his collar unless he jumps up}

    At the same time you can ask for a sit so you have something to reward him for.
     
  6. Beltane

    Beltane Enjoying Four Seasons

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    Our dogs do not have the best manners, but I'll try to offer some advice. :rolleyes:

    When pups jump up, they are trying to get your attention. Even if you yell and scream and grab them, they are getting what they wanted - your attention. I found that if you pull your arms to your sides and immediately turn your back on the pup when they jump, they will eventually become discouraged since they are not getting the same attention they are used to.

    Also, DH and I had trouble with one of our pups jumping on guests as soon as they walked through the door. What we did (and it worked) was that DH put a regular leash on the dog's collar and stood on the end of it. My neighbors kids would each take turns walking through the front door. When the dog saw the kids, he wanted to jump up to greet them but the leash held him back. Once the kids and I had conversed a bit, each of them would go over to pat and greet the dog on their own time. (And give a treat). When the dog realized that he was going to be patted and recieve attention by standing still and waiting, his immediate thought pattern changed to 'standing and waiting' from 'running and jumping'. It may take a few times to change this behavior ~ so good luck and don't give up. :)
     
  7. Becky H.

    Becky H. Well-Known Member

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    Dogs jump up because they are very social and want to greet you.

    Get down to their level and let them lick you if they want before they have chance to jump up.

    Greet them from their level so they don't have to go up to yours.
     
  8. Nature_Lover

    Nature_Lover Well-Known Member

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    Use the knee in the chest trick every time, and make sure she hits your knee with her breastbone, it will get sore (the breastbone, not the knee, lol,) and the habit will be broken in just a couple of days.
    It's pretty amusing when the dog catches herself in the middle of a jump, and draws back while on two feet when she remembers how much that contact will hurt.
    Pretty soon, the front feet will clear the ground, but the jumping habit is going away.
    I always, just conversationally, say the word "off" when the dog is going through this training, and then when she considers jumping on the kids or guests, I say the word "off" to remind her of that self-inflicted pain. Don't use the word "down," it's a completely different command, and you don't want her to disregard that word when you need her to lay, because you'll have used it so many times with a different intent, (without making her actually lay down.)
    I've never met a dog that I couldn't break of this habit (with proper training of ALL of the owners/victims.)
    They market 'No Jump Harnesses' for those owners who don't have the heart to let their dog get a sore spot on the chest for a few days.
     
  9. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Yes, I've seen those in magazines. Maybe I should see if a local pet store can order one for me. We've tried the chest/knee thing already and it doesn't stop her. It did for my border.

    I was thinking the short leash thing, too, but I'm betting she will shred it to pieces over the course of a few days. Plus I'm afraid she would get hung up on it.

    Thanks for the advice! Hopefully I can find something that works for her!

    DD
     
  10. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I have a simialr problem....my dogs would never jump on me, but when someone new comes over, it's jump city! Time to get people dirty!!
    How do I cure them of jumping on new people?? (Besides keeping them in, I already do that)
     
  11. Castaway

    Castaway New Member

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    My only concern with this is hurting the dog. We had a tenant's daughter letting the dogs out when she got home from school. Every once in a while the tenant (the mom) would let them out if there were after school activities. I know that she advocated the knee. One day we came home and our jumper had a bruise the size of a small dinner plate on his chest. I was quite ----ed off. :mad:

    There are other positive approaches...stepping on the leash or turning your back seems successful.
     
  12. Nature_Lover

    Nature_Lover Well-Known Member

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    castaway, I would be angry if my dog was bruised, too!
    A bruise that size was not from the dog bumping her breastbone on a knee.
    When I use this method, my knee is stationary as the dog approaches, my only movement is lining up the bone and knee.

    sullen, those dogs need a new job to do when greeting guests...
    make them sit.
    have the guest ignore the dogs until you ask the guest to approach the dogs while they're sitting and greet them. If they won't sit that long, remove them from the room when they get up. The next time, or the (third or fourth) time after that, they will stay sitting so they can eventually greet the guest.

    Or have them each get a favorite toy and show it to the guest, if you do this every time someone comes in, they will go looking for their toys instead of answering the door. When the doorbell rings, you tell the dogs to 'get your ball, or 'find the toy' or whatever your command is for that action.
    Give them a mission that doesn't include the guest until you're ready for them to meet the guest on your terms.
    Either way, don't open the door until they are under your control sitting or searching.

    The key things to remember when changing ingrained impulse behaviors are:

    be consistant, don't let them get away with anything.

    give them something else to think about in a given situation, instead of jumping, which is an automatic habit.

    make it clear to the dogs what you expect from them.

    make them having to leave the room a consequence of not staying in a sit, don't treat it like discipline, just matter-of-factly when the butt comes up off the floor, point to the doorway and say 'go' or 'out' or whatever your command is.

    They should be looking to you for cues, not the guest; you need to change their focus of attention to you.

    And praise them to reinforce and confirm expected behavior, let them know that they understand, and are doing what you want, it's what they live for.

    A customer of mine didn't really assert her dominance over her dogs, and just didn't have it in her to require obedience. She kept a basket of tennis balls on the front porch for guests to throw as they came in the door, for her dogs to chase. It had the desired effect of distracting the dogs from mobbing guests, but I always thought of it as a training compromise, not a success.
     
  13. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay, here's another trick.

    Teach your dog to jump on you. If she's too big to knee in the chest, I suspect she can put her front paws on your shoulder. Tap your shoulders or your chest and say, "hug", or some such word. Shee complies. You treat.

    Tell her, "sit". You may have to step back and let her fall off you. Use treat to lure her back into a sit. Praise and treat. Repeat over and over again.

    When she rushes up to you, use your hand to lure him into a sit, telling her once, "sit". Praise and treat. "hug", no treat, "sit", treat. Play this game with her on and off for a few days. When she is going to jump on you of her own accord, chastize with "aahh!", or "uh oh!", and model her into a sit. Work her on a couple of commands, then play the jump up game. When she is VERY reliable and not jumping on you except by invitation, just stop playing the game.

    I know it seems backward, but there will always be somebody (usually in the form of a male teenager) who will encourage the dog to jump up on him. If your dog is trained to jump up, her training will not be comprimised if it is on cue.