Stinky, irony water.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by seedspreader, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    I've seen it discussed before, but my water just stinks to high heaven. I do not have a softener working on it right now, we are not drinking it either. If I poor some bleach in the well, will it kill of the smell?

    Or, simply put, help.
     
  2. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    Bob

    I'm not sure why I bookmarked this, but it solved my problem (replaced the anode rod).


    The combined presence of hydrogen, sulfur, and bacteria cause foul smelling water. The magnesium anode rod installed in the tank protects the tank surface but generates enough hydrogen to create an odor when it interacts with sulfur in the water or bacteria in the tank. Replacing the magnesium anode rod with an aluminum anode may minimize the problem. The most efficient method of eliminating the hydrogen sulfide odor is to control the bacteria. As a rule, chlorination of public water supplies kills the bacteria, but some private well systems may need to be purified by the use of chlorine injectors or ultraviolet light. This will destroy the bacteria.
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I have water that is stinky of iron also. To solve that I had installed the correct system recommened which includes the iron filter backflush resin system and then to a water softener. Now my water is clear, odourless, and with a rainfresh charcoal filter at the tap is drinkable without any taste.
    Expensive, but for the long term it's worth it.
     
  4. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    Google "iron bacteria well" and see if that pertains to you, ZYG. If so you can do a "flush" treatment with bleach and that will help or even eliminate it. We had it something awful when we moved in but ours went away spontaneously after using the water for a while. The house had sat empty for over a year when we moved in, and just getting the water flowing through the well and pipes (and changing the filters) was enough to correct our situation.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  5. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    ZYG,

    We use chlorine injection and a large carbon filter. The big issue we have is that it is hard to keep the water consistent. We swing from chlorine water to "bad" water and back on a regular basis. So it requires a little active management.

    Mike
     
  6. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    we have water from a spring that is high in iron. the spring gets a good deal of algae that is cleaned now and again. i have used it all my life, but i don't really notice a smell. maybe i am just used to it.
     
  7. terrythetaod

    terrythetaod Well-Known Member

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    ZYG (and Mike in Ohio)... I feel your pain! People can talk all day about how great it is to be "off the grid", but if you have bad water, it is no joy! I had really bad water at my last place, and we had a setup similar to what Mike mentioned. Our well water was pumped into a 125 gallon holding tank, a chemical pump injects chlorine into the water when the pump runs. Then, before the water goes into the house, it goes through a carbon filter to remove the chlorine.

    The theory is that the chlorine reacts with the odor-causing chemicals (sulphur no doubt) and removes the odor. Some of the chemical binding produces a solid product that falls to the bottom of the holding tank. So, you have to occasionally flush that out. (There is a valve for that.) Mike is right, it requires a lot of management. But, if set up correctly, it does a tolerable job.

    I actually have the same setup at my new place, but our water is pretty good here. So, I mostly have it for peace of mind (chlorine kills bacteria too.)
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Try pumping it into a holding tank and run an aquarium bubbler thru the water before using it. Experiment with a large trashcan full before you spend much money on it.
     
  9. Taylor

    Taylor Well-Known Member

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    We have the same problem in our new hundred year old house; we're in a small town
    and on a drilled well. The water is awful; if it sits (like damp towels or sponges) for any time at all things mildew; there is disgusting scum around all the sink drains and faucets, and it stinks. We are buying water to drink, but I hate doing that. The water conditioner man came out and tested it, very high in iron, that's why soap doesn't do much good in washing and dishes. He suggested a water conditioner that will take out the iron. I am hoping hubby says we can get it, cause this is no fun. But I am glad
    that there is a solution. I miss the great well water at our old country place. :(
     
  10. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    mostly sulfer that stinks not iron