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Discussion Starter #1
I still don't know how to attack my green beans this year. If I inoculate the seeds before planting will that be enough for the beans to produce? Should I fertilize with 10-10-10 lightly throughout the season? My soil Ph is 6.8 so it is within range and everything else did fine last year.
 

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Using an innoculant initially, could make all the difference in the world depending on your soil. My first "attempt" to grow green beans was basically a waste of time, the soil was obviously lacking the bacteria needed to stimulate the roots to grow nodules to "fix" nitrogen. This article will better explain it http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/2429/#b

The following year, I innoculated the beans and had a great harvest. At the end of the season, I lifted a few roots and noticed they were loaded with the nitrogen fixing nodules. Each year, I clip the vines and turn the roots under and the innoculate is no longer necessary.

I give them a drink of compost tea every few weeks to keep them happy
 

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What happened to them this year? You don't tell us where you are, but sometimes weather conditions aren't favorable for one crop or another. Someone from your area might chime in with that information. They like warm soil. Plant them out just ahead of the tomatoes. If you plant too late, it can get too hot for them to pollinate well. Wet and cold can result in small beans, not well pollinated- you'll get pods with 1-2 beans in them and the rest of the pod curls up, empty.
 

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What happened to them this year? You don't tell us where you are, but sometimes weather conditions aren't favorable for one crop or another. Someone from your area might chime in with that information. They like warm soil. Plant them out just ahead of the tomatoes. If you plant too late, it can get too hot for them to pollinate well. Wet and cold can result in small beans, not well pollinated- you'll get pods with 1-2 beans in them and the rest of the pod curls up, empty.
What happened this year is I planted in raised beds and fertilized with 10-10-10 and planted seeds. The seeds germinated very well. The plants reached about 6-8 inches and began to die. I ended up with about 10 plants that reached 30" tall but never flowered or produced beans. The garden gets at least 10 hours of sun. I am in eastern North Carolina. My cukes, lima beans, corn, and tomatoes all did well, just not the beans. The seeds came from Johnny's.
 

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My beans have never been 30inches tall. Are you giving them too much nitrogen so they are putting all of their energy into their greens instead of putting forth fruit? Unless they are polebeans?? My green beans only get maybe 16 inches tall at most (Blue Lake Bush Beans)
 
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Discussion Starter #7
they were pole beans. We planted the first weekend after Easter Sunday. So it was probably in the mid 70s to low 80s. I fertilized when I made the beds but not once I planted. I had topsoil brought in and that is what I used in the beds.
 

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The temperature should have been right for planting. I wonder if it got to hot for them to germinate and grow well? 90 Degrees here and they stop production.
 

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maybe try a different variety next year?
 

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Maybe I should try a different variety. I planted Garden of Eden last year. Any suggestions on idiot proof green beans. Are bush beans as productive as pole beans? Oh and it gets 90 degrees here by the end of May.
 

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Many types of beans are actually very poor as far as legumes go in fixing n. Bush beans are very poor, relative to peas. Faba beans are excellent.

We never innoculate our bush beans at all, because they only fix such a small portion of their n needs, so we fertilize in a side dress fashion if necessary. We put our legumes on the prior years corn area, so the corn has used up a fair amount of nitrogen which was provided with composted sheep manure.

We have been growing a purple bean variety for several years, and have really liked it. It grows small plants, but pods profusely and for a long time, relative to any greens we have grown so far.

Of course each year is different as well. Some years for reasons unknown, some crops just do not do well. I hope this is your issue.

Good luck. We love our beans!!!
 

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If you brought in your topsoil, you might want to do a soil test. Ask for the complete test, to find out if you have an element deficiency--especially magnesium.

geo
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you brought in your topsoil, you might want to do a soil test. Ask for the complete test, to find out if you have an element deficiency--especially magnesium.

geo
I have already taken apart the beds as I didn't like them. They seemed to stay too wet. I tilled the top soil into the existing soil. This year I am planning on composting the whole area and tilling everything in. Maybe I will have better luck. I may still do the soil test though to see where it stands. Thanks.
 

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I like McCaslan and Kentucky wonder pole beans. You might need to look at other varieties that have been developed for your hot and humid climate. If you're at 90 degrees in May, you'll need to plant them out so you'll have plenty of days under 90 for them to pollinate. Once tey're pollinated, I think they'll do okay above 90. If you can find the number of days to pollination, that will help you figure out your dates.
 

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I like McCaslan and Kentucky wonder pole beans. You might need to look at other varieties that have been developed for your hot and humid climate. If you're at 90 degrees in May, you'll need to plant them out so you'll have plenty of days under 90 for them to pollinate. Once tey're pollinated, I think they'll do okay above 90. If you can find the number of days to pollination, that will help you figure out your dates.
I'll do that. Thanks.
 
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