Still another fencing question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by MaKettle, Sep 20, 2004.

  1. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    Got a little electric fence kit (uses four "D" batteries) and set it up to keep the pony from gorging herself on new grass this spring. So thrilled--it worked. Moved it so the neighbors cows could come into the pasture and eat down all the stuff the pony wasn't allowed to eat. Can't get the (*#@#$) copper rod out of the ground. It is only in about 8" with about 6" out of the ground, but is totally stuck. Have tried digging, but seems to be tree roots at that spot. Suggestions?

    Read that a galvanized pipe could be used instead of copper. Am wondering if a galvanized fence post such as used for electric fences coould be used, and insulated above ground with a length of garden hose.

    Noticed that the real farmer neighbor uses a rod with a handle welded onto it so he can yank it back out. Now that is a great idea.
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Apparently it was driven into tree roots,put a pipe wrench to it, if it will twist, it will pull.
     

  3. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Like the wrench idea,might also try adding some water to the grond,incase it might also be a rock aginst it. If you end up leaveing it make sure to drive it on down flush in the ground or your sure to find it with your lawn mower or foot every time you come by. :D Done the lawn more bit once myself.

    Yep copper is better but anything metal should work.I use 1/2inch copper water pipe,and soder a piece of copper wire to it..
    You really need it deeper than 8inches.It needs to be deep enough to be in damp ground at all times.The wetter, the more ground you get and the hotter the fence. ;)
     
  4. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Where did you get your electric fence kit? We want to get a few head of sheep and/or cattle to keep in about 40 acres of our property at the back. Is it hard to install? Hard to maintain? We are in zone 8 in AZ and the property only has small mesquite trees.
     
  5. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You know, just buying a new ground rod (copper plated & solid) at the local Electrical Supply house (or building materials center such as Lowes, Home Depot, McCoys, etc.) is not expensive. You can cut it into shorter lengths if desired. You should also buy ground clamp(s) for the rod at the same time.
    Dale (DH of mary, tx)
     
  6. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    Hank and Narita: I got the kit from Premier fencing. It is just for a small area, like enclosing a garden to keep the coons out, or keeping some livestock well accustomed to electric fencing in/out of a small area. (I used twice the number of fence posts needed and strung a white nylon cord along with the wire to make sure the critters saw it). For sheep, I think you need have a good jolt. Check out Premier--they have many fencing options.
     
  7. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Vice grips are pretty good for that sort of thing.
     
  8. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you clamp on with the vice grips just above the soil level, you can use a crow bar under the grips and against the rod.