Stihl 026 cylinder/piston removal

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by opus, May 11, 2006.

  1. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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  2. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    You may want to reevaluate if it is worth overhauling.

    If you go to a Stihl dealer the parts required (cylinder, piston, rings, piston through rod and clips for it and gasket) will run you likely over $200. Most new Stihls (MS series) are in the lower half of the $300s.

    However, the kit (without gasket) is available on eBay. I can point you to a seller who may have one for a bit of $100 plus about $9 shipping. Other listings are higher.

    Be sure you order the correct assembly as there is a size difference between the 026 and the 026 PRO.

    The cylinder is the heart of the saw so you are pretty well going to have to completely disassemble it to replace it.

    The 026s have held up value fairly well. Ones in very good condition go for $200-300 on eBay. Fixer-uppers are, of course, less. Good market for parts also.

    I'm in the process of having this done. Don't really know what happened. Run it earlier and run fine. Ran out of old gas, so filled my portable container from a full 5-gallon tank (marked as oiled gas). I am 99.9999% sure that gas had oil added and it had that dark green oiled look. Saw ran hot, then stopped. Now has less than 55 psi compression. Only thing different was the gas. I didn't purchase it myself. Farm worker was sent to the dumpsters with a load of trash and Co-op is next door. So I sent empty cans with him for fill-up. Possibility he filled up with high test. No longer works for me. Usual case of not showing up after getting paid for a weeks work.
     

  3. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Hey Ken,

    Found an OEM kit for $75 delivered. Actually bought kits from him before, just never done such a small engine before. Didnt know if there were any 'quirks' about it.

    Got it apart, blew a skirt.

    I am going to say your gas had no oil in it. Classic signs.
     
  4. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    That 026 pro is a dang marvel.Mine is older than dirt,gets used almost every day,and runs great.I geared mine down with a different sprocket,and with a yellow-lable chain,it'll handle whatever task any sane man is willing to tackle.
     
  5. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Not a Pro, but just the same, I have another one and I love it. This was given to me, and I knew better than to get rid of it. Hopefully I will be in it for $75 and be done. Actually, I need to get a bar, but thats easy enough around here.
     
  6. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    I cant remember the length,but the bar I use came off a tore-up 044 farm boss.The sprocket change was a huge improvement.For my purposes,the 026 has top-end to spare,and the lower gearing works well for me.All she needs now is a flame job.
     
  7. fixer1958

    fixer1958 None of the Above

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    I found out that if you use gas with alcohol in it (used to be called gasahol) it will seperate the oil in the gas and as a result you have a burned piston especially under a heavy and long load. A really big tree. I did it twice. That kind of hurts a little on a $500 saw. You can check it real easy by taking off the muffler and look at the piston. It will always burn up on the exhaust side.
    In hind sight I could see it coming because it would smell hot and start to loose power.
     
  8. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, thats a big no-no we are familiar with in snowmobiles. A lot of unsuspecting people melt down from it.
     
  9. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Just a follow-up. Mechanic took my 026 apart and said apparently the problem was caused by two of the cylinder bolts being loose. Caused it to run hot, freezing rings in piston. He emptied gas in tank into a glass jar and said it definitely looked to have oil added to it.
     
  10. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Thats good...although the same results. :(