Stevia

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by doc623, May 7, 2006.

  1. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    Have found a lot information on this plant that I am going to grow this year.
    However, I have yet to find information on how to use or render it into a usable form.
    Any help?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Dink

    Dink Well-Known Member

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  3. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    The guy on barter board that sells it seeds and rooted cuttings for a fair price sends an info packet with it. Also I think there is a book about it.http://www.stevia.net/
    bet that will tell you a lot of what you need to know.
     
  4. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Use dried, powdered leaves as a substitute for sugar. One tablespoon of stevia or less is equivalent to about 1 cup sugar. Some people notice a slight after-taste, while others do not. A liquid sweetener is made by pouring 1 litre boiling water over 1 tablespoon dried leaves and leaving to infuse. Refrigerate and use within a few days, or freeze for later. To make a syrup, place 4 teaspoons dried powdered leaves in a saucepan with 2 cups water, simmer slowly for 10-15 minutes. Cool and refrigerate. A teaspoon of Vitamin C powder may be added to act as a preservative. An infusion of fresh or dried leaves can be drunk as a beverage, hot or cold, or added to other herbs as a sweetener. If using fresh leaves to replace dried quantities listed above, multiply the amount 5 times. Approximately 6 large leaves chopped finely is a substitute for 1/2 cup of sugar for baking or in cooked recipes. 1 teaspoon of ground stevia is equal to 1 cup of sugar 2 drops of liquid essence is equal to 1 teaspoon sugar. A liquid sweetener can be made by steeping 1 tablespoon of dried stevia leaves in 1 litre of boiling water. An extract can be made by combining 1 cup vodka with 3/4 cup fresh stevia leaves in a jar. Shake every day for 2 weeks, then filter through a coffee filter. Add a drop to beverages.
     
  5. Goldwave

    Goldwave Active Member

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    I grew this one year; it's a nice pretty herbal-looking plant. No insect or disease problems with it at all and it stayed a nice polite shape and size. Wasn't touchy about watering, I kept it pretty underwatered probably! I just used the leaves in tea etc. but didn't excite me that much to keep growing it. Where I lived at the time it was easy to find all kinds of alternate sweeteners, and I had wild agaves all over the place as it was (those make a sweet syrup). I can't remember now but there are some good health benefits to this herb though if I recall; maybe try Googling for "stevia medicinal uses", I think it was cardiovascular benefits?
     
  6. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    Great thread and Links guys.

    I have been looking for just this info

    Culpeper. Thanks. Will try the recipes.

    What do you use the vodka based sweetner in?
     
  7. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Medicinal Uses Stevia:
    Can be safely used by diabetic people. Does not cause tooth decay. A tea from the leaves is an effective external treatment for cuts and abrasions. Anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. Useful in slimming regimes because of its ability to reduce craving for sweet and fatty foods. Also used in the treatment of high blood pressure, hypoglycaemia, and candidiasis.

    Apparently it was traditionally used by locals in Paraguay as a contraceptive, but clinical trials haven't been able to find any evidence of why this was so!