Steel Homes.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by oz in SC, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    While looking around at various sorts of homes I found this website:

    http://www.heritagebuildings.com/steel_homes/

    Anyone have any knowledge of these?

    Seems like it would be a lot easier to me than cutting wood-I know how to bolt pieces together :D
     
  2. Kadiddylak

    Kadiddylak Member

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    My plans were to go with metal . But the cost of steel has went up almost double from last year .The main reason i looked at steel was because of fire insurance. Im still going with a metal roof because here in Texas the hail tears up shingles to fast. Theres many steel homes around were i live. but i havent seen any new ones going up since steel prices increased.
     

  3. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    My BIL (one of them) is an engineer who does a lot of architectural work. When we visited them last week, he was telling us about one *former* client who insisted BIL draw up an all-steel house for him, even though BIL told him it would cost more than wood construction. Okay, client insisted, BIL drew up the plans, client got it costed out, and blew a gasket -- it would cost *twice* what a wood stick-built house would cost. (Client then tried to get BIL to draw up a new set of plans for free, BIL refused, since he'd warned client at the outset about the price difference, client sued, BIL got a lawyer and won, which is why he was telling us the story.) Anyway, get price comparisons with wood construction, and in your area I'd look at cement block, too, because you will likely have a lot of termites down there. A house that costs a little more now but is safe from termites might in the long run be less expensive.

    Kathleen
     
  4. Vera

    Vera Well-Known Member

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    This is going to sound like I'm some kind of weirdo, but metal interferes with people's magnetic fields and I think that long-term living in a metal building would have adverse effects on a body. People's magnetic fields aren't of much interest to mainstream medicine, so there's little research on the subject. But going by oldtimer wisdom, metal, electricity and water lines are things to keep at a distance from where you sleep and from where else you spend a lot of time. A whole house built of metal certainly wouldn't give you any opportunity to keep your distance at least while you sleep.

    The other thing is that a house built of metal can't breathe. Not that a breathable house is considered desirable these days, but an airtight house invites a host of health problems that are almost impossible to eliminate once they settle in.

    Me, I wouldn't want a metal house, but keep in mind that I'm from Germany where they're much more obsessed with healthy living than we're here :D
     
  5. Madame

    Madame Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've read different things about that too - I wouldn't take the chance.
     
  6. Kadiddylak

    Kadiddylak Member

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    Vera , you have a valid point about breathable houses .
    A friend of mine has a metal house-barn and one problem is condensation and mold. He has to have a a/c or electric heater running none stop to reduce moisture. Im not saying it cant be built to work ,but be careful if you do. A closed up airtight house is a unhealthy way to live.
     
  7. elle

    elle Member

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    Hi Oz, just be sure and check with the Rutherford County Building Inspecter before buying any home or materials they will be glad to let you know what they will allow you to build, you will need to draw up a proposal with sguare footage ,house design and materials you will be using, and they will go over the plans with you and make any needed changes, i know this doesn't answer the guestion you asked but it might help you decide what type of home you will build in the end..
     
  8. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    condensation is a problem and you need to properly put the vapor barer in correctly and if in freezing area one will need to insulate any through steel as it will freeze on the inside walls, as steel has all most no insulation in its self, the condensation is not so much a problem of air tightness but one of temperature and lack of any insulating properties, (had a friend that built them for a short time),

    and if you build inside a steel building you end up rebuilding a wood structure in the steel building,

    now if you end up cheating with steel (steel roof type sheets) a wood framed building that is a different situation, walls and roof, you have the wood and sheeting for insulation and the steel is just siding,
     
  9. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Here, I'd be very tempted to go with steel framing, but then you know we're the termite capital of the world. I also have to say that I know steel prices have sky-rocketed since I last did comparisions on steel-framing versus conventional, and that could have changed everything. I guess all I can say is that as far as construction goes it's viable, but I'm no longer sure on pricing.
     
  10. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Way back when I worked for an electric power company, there was a neighborhood of steel houses. Life was interesting when dealing with them. Electricity in a steel house is down right touchy and demanding. The houses were tough as nails though. Modifications and changes were nearly impossible to do to them.