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I want to homestead but I don't know where to start I have a couple years till I can move out of the house but I want to start prepping early can you help me?
 

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Household Six
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1. Cooking, especially from scratch. Keep a sharp eye for good older cookbooks. My short list:
- 1950 Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook (I have the reprint in binder and lay open flat)
- early 1980s Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cookbook (found mine for $5 in a thrift shop)
- 1962 edition Joy of Cooking (I paid $15 at a used book store for mine, in excellent condition and worth every penny!) - this is like a textbook on how to cook with many example recipes
- 1968/72 Betty Crocker Cookbook - apparently a "collector's item" and tends to be frustratingly expensive unless you can find one in a garage or estate sale. I am still looking for a copy for me, but a friend up the highway has one (absolutely no cover, torn pages, extemely dog-eared corners ... TRULY well loved)

2. Gardening. If you need to start out with container gardening, it is still a learning curve especially if you move to a different region.

3. Canning/preserving/drying.

4. Sewing/mending/knitting/crocheting ... textile fun. Otherwise known as "It's faster to learn how to make my own than to actually find good quality, durable clothing items!"

That is enough to keep you busy for a couple years.
 

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1. Cooking, especially from scratch. Keep a sharp eye for good older cookbooks. My short list:
- 1950 Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook (I have the reprint in binder and lay open flat)
- early 1980s Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cookbook (found mine for $5 in a thrift shop)
- 1962 edition Joy of Cooking (I paid $15 at a used book store for mine, in excellent condition and worth every penny!) - this is like a textbook on how to cook with many example recipes
- 1968/72 Betty Crocker Cookbook - apparently a "collector's item" and tends to be frustratingly expensive unless you can find one in a garage or estate sale. I am still looking for a copy for me, but a friend up the highway has one (absolutely no cover, torn pages, extemely dog-eared corners ... TRULY well loved)

2. Gardening. If you need to start out with container gardening, it is still a learning curve especially if you move to a different region.

3. Canning/preserving/drying.

4. Sewing/mending/knitting/crocheting ... textile fun. Otherwise known as "It's faster to learn how to make my own than to actually find good quality, durable clothing items!"

That is enough to keep you busy for a couple years.
I just looked; I have both versions of the BC cookbooks, AND all the others! A legacy from Mom, who loved cookbooks. Thanks for the reminder.

Great advice here!
 

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Household Six
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I just looked; I have both versions of the BC cookbooks, AND all the others! A legacy from Mom, who loved cookbooks.
Ok, here's one more: the Fanny Farmer Cookbook, originally published by the Boston School of Cooking in 1896. Hubby found me a nice leather-bound gilt-edged edition on the internet a few years ago.

I also LOVE cookbooks.
 

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There are a LOT of beginning homesteading accounts on-line! I would not only read them I would study them!

Here is a short version of mine:

I live in a state of mostly small cities. So, my husband located where his work was on a map, and then followed a major road out of town. Because it *WAS* a major road the snow is cleared off quickly and the speed limits are higher.

Then he drove what he thought was a reasonable commute out of town, and we looked in that area at the houses with land around them and we bought this place. It does only have an acre around it, but then I really like it here.

We have chickens, berries, fruit trees, a vegetable garden, a lot of daffodils, a green house that I made myself, and so forth.

We also have a 30 year mortgage.

Some people will buy bare land for cash and build as they can afford it, and they often have no mortgage at all. Different homesteaders make different choices.

You *WILL* need some money to start with. We saved up while we rented an apartment in town: we both worked.
 

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Unless you have a source of income you don’t have to currently work for (social security, pension, trust fund) move somewhere you can get work. Check out what you would be paid. Even if your land completely sustains you, you’ll need to pay taxes, see a doctor, etc. Things that cost dollars.

If you have never taken care of livestock, start small. Chickens are nice. Look up chicken tractors (in case you have chicken eating predators in your area- can’t free range them). Sheep are easier than cattle and you can butcher them in the fall and not carry them over the winter. Try lasagna gardening, You can’t do it in a pot but you can do it in a box if you don’t have a yard. Put the manure and green garbage back into the land by learning how to compost. You can compost slow using bins, or compost fast using a large enough tumbler with a small motor.

Have some idea of what you want so you know what property will suit you. A small orchard is nice. Protect the tree trunks and your orchard can double as pasture. Research the nutrition of each species and each type, as well as how to prune them for picking. Ditto for bushes- blueberries, high bush cranberries, bush cherries, bush hazelnuts, raspberries… Know what soil types are desired by different plants and if you can amend the soil to suit you.

Remember that you are not getting younger, you are getting older. Always look to work in ways that will save your back. Use chutes with animals, cages with birds. Use pulleys and ropes and wagons. Keep the grass mowed around the house or you will get fleas and ticks. Don’t let your dogs roam.
 
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Consider building a tiny house on a trailer. There are lots of sites online that discuss how to build one. Even a tiny house should be plenty of space for someone starting out on his/her own and if you use a used trailer as the base the costs should be manageable. Having a portable house will give you more options as you can move from spot to spot until you find just the right place to settle for the long run. You may be able to rent a little acreage from someone and put your tiny house on it and try your hand at homesteading that way. If you like the place and are a good neighbor maybe you'll be given the option to purchase the ground you've been working on. Once you build a permanent house you can sell your tiny house or find another use for it. It's good that you're making your plans in advance as success is much more likely. I'm planning for my retirement place over the next 7 years and planning it, already, is a lot of fun and it makes the time go faster. I hope that planning this far in advance will also help me avoid costly mistakes and to, in the end, have things just the way I want them. Enjoy.
 

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Household Six
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Then you have plenty of time to learn a whole slew of skills! Find books, find informational websites, find teachers ... but most of all get as much hands-on experience you are able.

Oh, the previous advice about being mindful of/saving your back is still valid. Trust me on that one.
 

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When or where your able to, take any courses that teach you engine repair, both small and large. IF your adaptable to that kind of work, then take a course in gunsmithing. Between the 2 you should be able to find work enough when your on your own to make enough money at home to live on. I seen a clear plastic 4 cyl engine on a novelty catalog page that one takes apart and puts back together and it runs. That would be good for you right now. Good luck.
Learn to garden, no matter how small it is. IF you don't have the ground to garden in, look for some old folks who have garden in the past and ask. Maybe they'll let you garden on their ground for 1/2 the veggies.
Learn to can veggies/fruit/meat.
 

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Try to finagle a summer vacation with a relative or a school group where such lifestyle is already practiced. You will get down and dirty fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wher in live is extremely cold and hard to garden in but I container garden it's a passion and the reason I want to move to the Lucian's is I love fishing
 

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Please explain your last statement.
And for your information. Ive wanted to farm since I was at least your age, and I know much sooner than that. Im 67 now.
 

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At 11, can I ask if your a gamer? IF so, I can suggest you get the game Farm Simulator 2013. IF you get it, I can tell you what machinery I have. If you get the same, I can tell you how to use them, and youll get some real experience on how to do things like plow, disc, harrow, plant, sow, mow, rake, bale, ect.
 
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