Starting tomatoes & peppers from seed

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by blhmabbott, May 7, 2004.

  1. blhmabbott

    blhmabbott We're gettin' there!

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    Due to different reasons, I am just now going to be planting the garden this weekend. I've never planted tomatoes or peppers from seed before (I've always used plants) and was wondering if it is to late to plant these for Zone 6. I wish I could start out with already established plants again, but money just does not allow it and I already have the seeds. Can someone answer this question please?
    Thanks!
    Heather
     
  2. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    Im in 7 and it takes peppers a LOOOOOOONNNNNNNGGGGGGG time to mautre.
     

  3. blhmabbott

    blhmabbott We're gettin' there!

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    :( I was afraid someone was gonna say that.
     
  4. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    yeah I started my tomatoes from seed in late jan. peps too.
     
  5. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Do you have about 150 frost free days left?....or can you create them (ei, hot caps, plastic tunnel, etc) I would give early tomatoes a shot. Also, make sure you create a nice jungle atmosphere for your peppers to encourage quick growth.
    Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
     
  6. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Definitely try the jungle idea. Our peppers started out slow but DH had the greenhouse finished about 2 weeks ago. What a difference. The temps are over 100 during the day with the doors shut. Give it a try.
     
  7. ckncrazy

    ckncrazy Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion I would start seeds in Jan or feb. Im not sure what your weather has been like, But it is still too early to put plant out in my area. It could be 80 one day and 35 the next. We usualy plant around decoration day. I have put them out erlier but spent too much time watching the weather.
     
  8. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some one on this forum, Maybe Sherk?? (sorry if that's not right), starts their tomato seeds in the ground--never in a pot.
    I used this method about 20 years ago. Make a 'hill' and then flatten out the the top of it and plant the seeds, water good and then put a qt. jar over it for a week or so (until it sprouts). It should get going quickly. When DH farmed for a living, he sowed our tomato seeds under a clear plastic sheet (just like they do with tobacco plants). In three weeks they were about 6" tall-- we pulled them up and transplanted them in the garden. What have You got to lose... Just be sure to report about the out come for us. Thanks Debbie
     
  9. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

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    I am zone 4 - last frost Memorial Day, first frost as early as August 27. I have several volunteer tomato plants that have come up the past few years and they have definitely been my strongest, healthiest plants. We plow and till the garden the weekend we are planting. So they do not have a head start. As for peppers, the "jungle" idea is a good one. I started our seeds here very late. THey have only been in for 2 weeks. They are huge though (inside this is). We mist them, have boxed them in so they have no draft and are warm. Try seeds in the garden - what have you got to lose. Wall of waters - saran wrap over the seeds until they are up. Foil under the plants in our area to increase the heat and sun, increases our yield - it may cook your plants. Use your common sense and it will work.

    We did renovations on our home one year and I could not get my garden in until July 4th - I was raging at the excavator to get that dirt off my garden for a month. The combination of the later start with really warm temps and good luck I guess - we had a great garden.

    On another point - you can't buy any, you have the seeds, what have you got to lose. Good luck and don't sweat the small stuff.
     
  10. Cara

    Cara Well-Known Member

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    Martin (Paquebot) starts his in the ground, but he puts the seed in the ground in the fall. I think you could do it in some kind of cold frame, if you have a quick maturing variety.