Starting Persimmons from seed

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Randy Dandy, Oct 23, 2004.

  1. Randy Dandy

    Randy Dandy Well-Known Member

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    I'm wanting to plant aprox. 10 Persimmon trees in a certain area. So, from a nearby lacation I took several of the Persimmon trees fruit w/seeds inside, and buried them in potting soil, and covered aprox. 1/2" to 1" of potting soil on top of them. When I took the fruit from the actual branch/twigs, I phisically left attached to the fruit, a small portion of the branch/twig. I did this thinking it might help the seeds get whatever they might need while they go through they're natural process. Will these seeds start to sprout up next spring ?, or longer ?, Or do I need to take a different aproach ? Thanks, Randy
     
  2. Manny

    Manny Well-Known Member

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    Here's what has worked for me---------I separate the seeds from the fruit pulp, put them in a "baggie" with some slightly moist potting soil and put them in the refrigerator. I think the seeds are not fully mature when they come out of the fruit and need a time in the cold to ripen. This process is called "stratification", look it up with "google". After a couple of months check the seeds and when they are ready they will start to sprout, that's the time to pot them up. It is not necessary to plant the whole persimmon with twig attached. The process you have described may work if you bury the pots in the ground outside so they can be kept cold during the winter-----if you keep them inside the warmer house the immature seed may just decompose along with the fruit pulp.
     

  3. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Randy -- there are several Master Gardeners on this board who will likely give you better advise then I but (you knew that was coming right?) my first thought was not only are you asking the fruit to decompose enough for the seed to germinate, but you left part of the branch on the fruit and are also asking the branch to take root.

    We've had better luck starting cuttings, make sure you have a bud, then we have with attempting to start fruit trees from seeds. I would think you'd have a better change with either if you didn't attempt to do both at the same time.

    Good luck.
    Marlene
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My brother lived in southern Indiana where persimmons are common in the wild. His coon hounds would eat them and later make deposits around the edge of the yard. Every spring he had a big crop of persimmon trees come up around the yard. So you might just feed the ripe persimmons to your dog, and tie him where you want your new trees. Maybe Not. LOL
     
  5. Randy Dandy

    Randy Dandy Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all very much for your info/response. The pot that I put the fruit in, is sitting outside. I thought to be sucessful with cuttings, that it would need to be in the summer time, is that right ? And unlike Willow trees I've heard that it's hard to start cutting from hardwoods. :( I will also try the seeds in the bag trick. Did I understand you correctly that the seeds will actually sprout in the refrigerator in aprox. a couple of months ? Thanks, Randy
     
  6. Manny

    Manny Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Mine usually do, also apple, pear, oak, peach, filbert, and many others. IF, after a couple of months they do not sprout for you, pot the seeds up in the Spring just like any other seeds or you can pre-sprout by putting them in a moistened paper towel in a warm spot. I've even had orange and grapefruit seed sprout in the fridge and I always thought they were tropicals. Don't let the roots get too long before potting up though, they break easily and that's bad.