Squash ?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by jackie c, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I'm planning the layout for my garden, and am trying several different types of squash. Can I plant them in close proximity together or will they cross pollenate? Or can I plant summer and winter squashes together?
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    jackie, It depends.
    There are bush squash varieties that are compact and don't spread. One that comes to mind which is nice is Golden Acorn, but there are many more. Look for
    'Bush' varities. These generally can be planted about 4 ft. apart, or so.
    The spreading varieties, like buttercup are excellent. I've mixed them in with other varieties like Hubbard and butternut, and ended up with 'true' looking and tasing squash. The cross pollinating concern is mainly if you want to keep seed for future plantings and not the outcome of the fruit from the blossom.
    If you plant corn, why not intermingle that with rambling sqash plants. Plant the squash when the corn is about a foot tall or more, so the corn has a head start on the squash vines.

    Squash is an ideal crop to grow after a cover crop of a tilled in legume like clover or field peas when they blossom but before going to seed. Otherwise, it may need feeding or some rotted manure mixed in where the roots can gain the nutirents.
     

  3. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    The cross pollinating concern is mainly if you want to keep seed for future plantings and not the outcome of the fruit from the blossom.


    he's right.:) you only need to worry about cross-pollination if you save seed.

    even then, if you DO save seed, the most important thing to worry about is bloom time. if two plants flower at different times, they cannot cross pollinate. remember that the flowers are sex organs, so they are only susceptible to being bred at certain times, ie. when they are blooming.
     
  4. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I would worry about squash bugs and squash vine borers.
     
  5. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replys. I'm just worried about the fruit so I guess I won't bother trying to keep them apart. Are there companion plants that go with squash which will repel the bugs and borers?
     
  6. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    There is companion plants for squash, I just can't remember off hand what they are. :eek: Is it asparagus???
    A good way to enhance squash growing to fool vine borers or squash bugs is rotation planting. In other words, don't plant the squash in the same place the following year. I've never seemed to have any problem with the bugs bothering squash that much. Also, if you encourage those small parasitic wasps to your squash, they are beneficial.
     
  7. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    you may be too far north for this, but the companion plants are called the three sisters. it is said that native americans planted corn, beans and squash together. the corn gave the beans something to climb on, and the squash acted as a ground cover. in reality , only certain kinds of corn, beans and squash grow together well.

    for sure, the far bigger problems are squash vine borers and squash bugs. the borers get mine sooner or later, most every year.
     
  8. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Been reading Carrots Love Tomatoes ( so graciously loaned to me by another HT member) and planting nasturtiums with squash help to repel squash bugs, and tansy to repel borers.
     
  9. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    You know, I never tried nasturtiums near squash. Great reminder, Jackie.
    I now am remember that it's asparagus that is helpful for tomatoes and the horn worm. The halftimer's alzheimer's sometimes sets in. That's how that goes. :eek:
     
  10. kathrynlmv

    kathrynlmv Well-Known Member

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    I have grown squash for years and have always planted different varieties (CUCUMBER, GOURDS, MELONS, SQUASH) ABOUT 10 FT. APART AND HAVE NEVER HAD ANY CROSS POLINATING PROBLEMS, BUT I'VE HAD SEVERAL FRIENDS WHO DID NOT FOLLOW THIS RULE, AND ENDED UP WITH VERY BIZARRE FRUITS THAT NOBODY WANTED TO TRY. TO AVOID THE SQUASH BORERS, PLANT A COUPLE OF WEEKS LATER FOR YOUR AREA, AND COVER WITH SOME KIND OF NETTING FOR THE FIRST MONTH OR SO.
     
  11. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Doesn't work for those dang squash bugs. :no: Had one this year sucking a seedling dry at the beginning of the planting season. That's when you know they are going to be baaaaad.
     
  12. evilbunny

    evilbunny Well-Known Member

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    I had squash bugs this year, there was another name for them, I think it was stink bugs. They attacked not only squash but beans and cucumbers.

    I tried hand picking them off, not only did they make me sick smelling them but I spent hours and barely made a dent in them. I tried nearly everything including a organic powder, nothing killed them.

    Next year I want to plant a bunch of kinds of squash and I am hoping to find a better way to defend them. If anyone has any ideas please pm me.

    I have heard that most squash will cross and come up with crazy fruit but I have to admit the flowering stage idea gave me a good idea, might plant them a few weeks apart, put summer squash between any winter squash and hope that covers the problem. I like the netting solution too but I am too poor to do that, think a thin sheet of cloth, like a bed sheet might work? Or will that keep out too much light?
     
  13. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    A sheet will work, however, squash need to be pollinate in order to produce fruit. If you are willing to hand pollinate, tho, it shouldn't be a problem. I think I would prefer to hand pollinate over fighting squash (stink) bugs.
     
  14. dreadstalker

    dreadstalker Well-Known Member

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    if i remember right radishes are a good companion to squash.to reduce the borers make sure that you clean up any debris,leaves and such.if you find any plants that have been attacked by borers pull the entire plant root and all ,do not compost infected plants
     
  15. desnri

    desnri Well-Known Member

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    Here is a list of do's and don'ts of companion planting. I hope this helps you.

    The interplanting of vegetables
    The following table should act as a guide to help you eliminate certain problems in your garden.

    Anise: Coriander Aids the growth and flavor of Anise.
    Asparagus: Parsley or basil Controls Aspargus beetles.
    Basil, Sweet: throughout garden Enhances the flavor and growth of everything around it.
    Carrots: Sage Deters carrot (rust) flies.
    Chamomile throughout garden: Brings overall health to the garden. Attracts good insects.
    Chervil: Radishes One plant requires heavy nutrients while the other requires very little.
    Chives: Carrots, grapes, roses, and tomatoes Curb Japanese Beetles, and black spot.
    Corn: Snap beans or soybeans Enhances growth of corn.
    Cosmos: throughout garden Bad insects won’t come near it, but it will attract pollinating wasps.
    French Marigolds throughout garden: Strong odor confuses pests looking for their favorite plant.
    Garlic throughout garden: Repels aphids and beetles.
    Mustard: Beans One plant requires heavy nutrients while the other requires very little.
    Mints: Cabbage, strawberries Deters aphids and other aphid pests, as well as ants who invade strawberries.
    Nasturtiums throughout garden: Repels aphids and white flies.
    Onions: Carrots The two combined help to control rust flies and some nematodes.
    Peanuts: Corn Increases yields of both crops.
    Peas: Lettuce, spinach, and Chinese cabbage Benefit from the shade and wind protection peas provide.
    Potatoes: Horseradish and/or tansy Plant plenty for maximum benefits in attempt to ward off Colorado Potato Beetles.
    Radishes: Squash, cucumbers, and/or Carrots Great deterrent against Cucumber Beetles and Rust flies. Also eliminates diseases spread by these plants.
    Rue throughout garden: Disagreeable taste and bad odor sends even persistent pests on their way.
    Sage: Strawberries, Cabbage, and/or Tomatoes Deters unwanted pests and benefits each other in garden.
    Savory throughout garden: Ideal planting crop. Attracts good insects.
    Spinach: Beans or tomatoes Benefits from the shade both plants provide.
    Strawberries: Borage or sage Enhances flavor of fruit and strengthens plant’s resistance to insects and diseases.
    Tansy: Cabbage and/or potatoes Deters Cutworms, Cabbage Worms, and Colorado Potato Beetles.
    Thyme: Tomatoes and/or cabbage All three together control Flea Beetles, Cabbage Maggot, White Cabbage Butterflies, Colorado Potato Beetles, and imported Cabbage Worms.


    The Don’ts Of Companion Planting
    Don’t plant French marigolds with beans.
    Don’t plant tansy with collards.
    Don’t plant cucumbers with sage.
    Don’t plant chrysanthemums with lettuce.
    Don’t plant wormwood with peas or beans (wormwood in other areas of the garden will deter slugs.)
    Don’t plant peppers with tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, or where peppers were planted in the last three years.
    Don’t plant tomatoes with fennel or potatoes.
    Don’t plant families that are closely related, and attract the same pests.
    Don’t plant allelopathic plants too close to your garden.
     
  16. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the list desnri. I'm going to print it out. I've always planted sage and marigolds with certain things in the garden. Didn't know about not planting peppers and tomatoes together. I've always planted my bell peppers and tomatoes side by side with no problems.

    One year I planted zuchinni and spaghetti squash side by side and they crossed. I had some strange looking squash!
     
  17. desnri

    desnri Well-Known Member

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    I plant my bell peppers next to my tomatoes, too. I think the list is referring to hot peppers. It'll make your tomatoes hot. I've never known winter squash and summer squash cross pollinating. I plant mine side by side and have never had a problem. I do make sure that my zucchini and yellow squash are at least 15-20 feet apart. If I remember correctly, I got that list off of the Backwoods Home website.