Squash beetles

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by NativeRose, Apr 13, 2005.

  1. NativeRose

    NativeRose Texas Country Grandma

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    Texas
    Saddle bugs, squash beetles and grasshoppers are here. They are just waiting for the squash to come up to start munching. AAAARRRRGGGG!!!!! :grump: I am going to have a time of it keeping my veggies from being consumed by all the pests that have arrived. We had such a mild winter I think they just waited around until spring. I counted 25 huge squash bugs on one of my ash trees. I will have to get something to spray on them. I need to find a good organic product. I hate bugs!!!!!!!!!! Do any of you have a good organic product that you have used and found effective on nasty ugly squash bugs?? Help!!!
     
  2. Deborah Stephenson

    Deborah Stephenson Well-Known Member

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    Squash bugs and blister beetles are our #1 and #2 nemesises(sp? how do you pluralize that word?! :confused: ) here in our garden too. We've tried everything (organic anyway, since we don't use the nasty stuff) but about the only thing that seems to have any effect is a solution of weak coffee. You can add a drop or two of dish detergent to that if you like - it seems to help it cling a bit better - but otherwise that's it. The only thing is you have to actually douse the bugs themselves pretty well. If you only put it on the plants or if you don't get the bugs well soaked, it won't work.

    Pure pyrethrum will work too, but it is hard to get a commercial spray that doesn't include about 99% inert ingredients (and since "inert" by law can be anything the manufacturer has lying around that he/she feels like throwing in, you can't trust it to be harmless). If you do find a can that is 100% pyrethrum, it will cost a bundle, but a little bit will go a long way.

    By the way, most of you will already know this, but I didn't the first time I found blister beetles on my vegetables and could have done a lot of damage if I hadn't found out about it fairly early on, so I'll pass this along for those who don't already know... blister beetles can cause fatalities in many animals if they are consumed. Your chickens will likely avoid them naturally (mine did when I stupidly tried to feed the bugs to them!), but if you have livestock - especially horses - avoid giving them any foliage or produce that could possibly be contaminated with blister beetles (alive or dead). I've known horses to be killed by ingesting just one or two of these little guys in contaminated hay, so please BEWARE!

    Anyway, good luck - this is one of the toughest pests to get rid of. Once you have them, you're probably going to be stuck with them every year, unfortunately!
    :bash:
     

  3. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    TX
    I think groworganics MIGHT still have pyrethrum? OR what about neem?

    Row covers work if you want to take the time. I made a pvc framework over my ENTIRE garden a few years back, I was so desperate, lol. Then I bought miles of nylon net to cover it. It worked but it didn't last. Last year I put that plastic cheap bird/deer netting over it to keep out deer that had busted into my side yard? And it kept out the grasshoppers better than I ever would have imagined! SO it looks pretty funky, but it is staying.

    hollym
     
  4. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We planted radishes in and around our squash to keep those bugs away. I bought the cheapest radish seed I could find and sprinkled it all over and covered it lightly! We just let it go to seed. It helped!