Squash arch help!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by HorseMom, Jul 5, 2017.

  1. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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  2. weavingone

    weavingone New Member

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    See if you can find a few pallets that are HT branded, (which means heat treated) to build your planting boxes out of at the base of where you want the trellis ends to end. I didn't see your pic but I have built many of these and greenhouses with them as well. The base needs to be narrow enough to provide the pressure to keep the arch ...well...arched. You can do this with a stick off some tree limb just to hold it long enough to get your planter built.
     
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  3. HorseMom

    HorseMom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bearfootfarm I rent a trailer in a trailer park. I cannot use fence posts. I can not dig post holes, so many rules.

    Weavingone no place I know of around here gives away the good pallets, just the crappy, cheap, wood.

    I did get the rebar. Not the $2.25 4' poles I saw online. Those were not carried in store so I had to get the more expensive ones. I wove 1 of 8 last night, it was a PIA, lol. I'm working 12 hrs shifts the next 3-4 days so maybe I can get the other ones done and share a pic
    Heidi
     
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  4. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    You wove them?
    I dont think that's really necessary to weave the rebar into the panel ends, but that will work too!
     
  5. HorseMom

    HorseMom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yeah like 4 times lol!
     
  6. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    That will make it way more stable, for sure!!

    I can't really say anything bad about it, except the PITA factor.

    I was thinking more along the lines of driving the rebar into the ground where yo want your panel ends to be and setting your arch up inside of the rebar stakes. You can tie the panels to the stakes for added stability. Or not, your choice!!

    I stole this pic from Google to give you an idea of what in the heck, exactly, I meant. See how the panels sit inside the t posts?
     

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  7. HorseMom

    HorseMom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As everything else in my life goes, I failed at this too. I might as well rip out the pumpkin plant while my daughter is at her dad's
     

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  8. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Awwwwww, don't do that!!! She will be so sad......

    What about string or wire at the very bottoms of the arc to hold the ends together so the arch stays intact? I know you would be walking on the string, but maybe a mat or something could cover it where the walkway is?

    Um, I wish I could draw you a picture of what I mean.

    I'm so sorry about your troubles, I would come over and help you get er done if I could!
     
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  9. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Does the cattle panel still lay flat when it isnt stood up?

    Lay it down flat on the ground.....grab some wire or rope or twine. Tie the ends (at corners and maybe in middle too) to each other so it forces the panel into an arch. Then stand it up and use your rebar (and more twine) to secure it. If it wont stand up you may have to make the ends stand further apart. With 16' panels you will still have headroom to walk underneath.

    I think that maybe you are trying to make an almost-circle from the panel? Either that or your ends aren't far enough apart.
    Go for more of a U-shape, the almost circle shape would definitely be problematic to maintain. The arch shape is important.
     
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  10. ed/La

    ed/La Well-Known Member

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    I did not read this whole thread so maybe repeat answer. You have to be careful or it might blow away in a storm. Damage a car or something. That is why you need to anchor to the ground securely.
     
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  11. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    If I'm seeing it correctly, you have the rebar on the right and nothing on the left.

    Unless those pieces are 8 feet long, you don't have nearly enough in the ground to give support, and you still need something on both sides.

    This is what you need, with at least 3 feet in the ground if the soil is firm and more if not.

    ARCH.png
    Use some stainless steel "hose clamps" to attach the panel to the rebar, and let the natural arch of the panel determine the optimum width at the bottom.

    If it still wants to fall over, add a couple more stakes a few feet away from the arch and attach guy ropes higher on the side. Those would only need to be tall enough to attach the ropes or wires.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
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  12. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Her rebar is 6', I think it will be fine for this purpose if its used correctly
     
  13. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Yes, those are long enough if most of that length is in the ground.
    It may be that the bottom will need to be a little wider to make it stand.
    You have to let the panel tell you what it wants to do.

    It can also help to cut off the horizontal pieces along the bottom edges, leaving spikes that can stick in the ground. It helps to have good bolt cutters to do that job.
     
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  14. light rain

    light rain Well-Known Member

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    I would like to find a source of 6 ft. rebar! In our area it goes from 4 ft. then to 10 ft. I have not had the nerve to buy 10 ft. and try cutting it into 5 ft. sections in the suppliers parking lot. I'm not even sure what the best power tool is to cut the 1/2" rebar with???

    HorseMom you can make this idea work. We've been using two panels arched and covered with tarps to keep our firewood dry for several years now. This season I need to pull it apart and redo... not because it doesn't do the job but because it doesn't look too good...

    On our hoop house we used 6x6's to secure the cattle panels into. We already had the 6 x 6's but I use 1/2" rebar pounded over 2 ft. in the ground to secure pvc pipes for arches. You have to make sure that there is nothing in the ground under the area that you are putting the rebar down that can't be touched or damaged... like water pipes, electricity or fiber optic.
     
  15. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    I agree, it looks to me like the ends are way too close together on this particular project. Needs to be spread out
     
  16. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    An angle grinder with a cutting disk or a skill saw with a cutting disk would do it easily.
    A "Sawzall" is a great tool, but costs a lot more.
    A "Portaband" would be ideal if you had lots to cut.
    upload_2017-7-14_12-33-46.jpeg


    upload_2017-7-14_12-35-57.jpeg
    [​IMG]
     
  17. light rain

    light rain Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Bearfoot farm! DH said we had the first two, I've used the sawzall before, but he said no to the portaband. When I go to HDepot I'll get a disk for the angle grinder. Vaguely remember a late talk show with a demonstration. Won't be as theatrical but will maybe serve to send our kids and friends an amusing video and text...
     
  18. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    LOL
    "Grinder Girl".
    I always liked her.

    One thing I just thought of though.

    I'm wondering if having pumpkins growing on an overhead arch is really a good idea, considering how big and heavy they might become.
    Other squashes or gourds wouldn't add as much weight.
     
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  19. HorseMom

    HorseMom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have rebar wove into all 4 corners. I do not have anything pounded into the ground because I live in a trailer park and who knows what's where. I tried a wider base, so wide that at 5'6" I almost had to duck to walk under, it still wants to fall left. I'm considering t posts for it to rest on, but I'm very nervous about putting anything too deep in ground. I also wondered about overhead pumpkin's!!!! I have 2 panels for extra width for the plant. I was gonna over lap them a bit in the middle. I have to get one to stand first. Thanks for all the ideas and support.
    Heidi
     
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  20. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    You absolutely do have to pound the rebar into the ground, hate to tell ya...