Sprouted grain for hogs?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by snoozy, Jan 13, 2004.

  1. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've been thinking it would be easier to sprout grains to feed to pigs than to cook stuff. Any thoughts or experience?
     
  2. Farmall

    Farmall Active Member

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    and ive been thinking how many times me and many others have said, fee grain whole, as as it comes from the field or store. Dont cook it, sprout it, parch, groul, or roast it. Feed it as it is. like it is. If you have enough time to do any of the above, u either need to get more hogs, or rabbets, chickens, turkeys, cows or goats. Whatever, You have entirly too much time on your hands LOL
     

  3. Matt NY

    Matt NY Well-Known Member

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    I recall reading that values of many feeds increase dramatcally with some sort of cooking. I'm about trying to get as much out of what I have rather than trying to get just more.

    Sprouts do make sense to me, although the proof is in the puddin.

    YMMV
     
  4. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    Soy beans are cooked to doubble it's protein content up to 44 percent..

    Grain is cracked or ground so it can be digested and absorbed easier.

    Most Whole grains just pass through the body wasted, and never digested.

    People used to feed cattle whole corn and grains and half of it would pass through the cattle and they would put some hogs in with the cattle to eat their crap and fatten the hogs without feeding them.

    The hogs did real good growing on the free feed, and they raise good hogs too.