Spring and baby wild animals/birds

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Little Quacker in OR, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) OK everyone, it's spring again. Time to remind some about finding wild babies, animals and birds:


    http://www.usma.edu/PublicAffairs/PV/010629/Animals.htm

    For the most part unless the critter is in immediate danger or wounded, LEAVE IT ALONE!!!!!

    Read the above link and take it from there.

    Maybe should throw in the annual Hummingbird regimen too. LOL They are sooo cute! LOL

    Firstly please use a quart of water to 3/4's cup of granulated sugar. Bring just to a boil and remove from heat to cool. DO NOT ADD FOOD COLORING! Refrigerate. When you hang out the feeder do clean it well in between fillings with soap and water and rinse very thoroughly. Do this every three or four days in cool weather and every other day or so if it's hot. This is the closest recipe to natural nectar in the wild.

    Keep in mind that you do not HAVE to keep those feeders full all of the time. It's good for the little terrors to go out and forage for their normal foods in between. They slurp up tiny little insects while they are lapping up the nectar for much needed protein.

    For flying pests like wasps, hornets etc. apply vasaline or petroleum jelly around the feeder ports and use "bee guards". For ants, apply it thickly on the twine or wire holding the feeder up.

    You can leave those feeders out for another three weeks after you see the last birds. Feeders will NOT keep them from migrating, and that last bit of nectar might save some johnny-come-lately on it's way south who is migrating a bit late.

    This is the regimen used by the San Diego Zoo and Wildlife Park. These wonderful people have been able to breed many a delicate species of hummingbird in captivity.

    Have fun..I just love spring! LOL LQ
     
  2. MomInGa

    MomInGa Well-Known Member

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    Hi Little Quacker
    If I can add a bit to your thread here.
    I worked with hummers when I did rehab. Lovely birds.
    When I lectured or helped folks out, there was one thing I asked them to consider. I'm not sure all would agree with me, but from my experience, I would suggest it.
    Do not have perches on your hummingbird feeders. Because of their extraordinary metabolism, body temperature can change rapidly. A chilled hummer cant take flight, and once the body temperature has dropped, puts them in grave danger from the heat loss. Their hovering will help regulate their temperature. If they need to cool down, they will find a better and safer place to do it.
    It wont hurt them to hover as they feed.
    To keep it simple, in the summer you can use 1 part sugar to 4 or 5 parts water. In the colder times, if you decrease the water a bit, you will be giving them a bit of an added needed push. I use 1 part to 3 or 4 then.
    Boil it as you said, no to food coloring, and let the water cool. Then add to feeders. Keep the feeder clean, the food fresh, and you will have a healthy nectar to offer these tiny treasures.
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    LQ, I'll also add that as cruel as it seems to leave those fallen from the nest or orphans alone, it is best in the long run. Let nature take its course promptly and swiftly as per God's plan.

    A reminder that in most states it is illegal to harbor wildlife without a license.
     
  4. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Oh Boy! Let's discuss the Hummers! This is a fascinating subject and in constant flux.

    MominGa..you brought up an interesting point. Although for the average person who just wants to observe and enjoy these little charmers, the above sugar solutions work just fine...in nature, flower nectars vary tremendously. Hummer's can utilized a solution that is as strong as half and half, water and sugar. But, they won't visit the feeders as often. Of course, that's still a lot of feeding.

    Hummers can regulate their body temps like they do at night. Unless it's very cold I don't worry about the perches. I am glad I don't live in a cold place! LOL

    The world is changing and it's impacted the survival of the hummingbird quite severely. Not only just the distruction of habitat, but the ever-changing political scene. Zoos and wildlife parks cannot obtain hummers any longer fron areas that used to supply them. And the breeding of species in captivity is in a decline. Most of the hummers these days in the Zoos come from rehabed birds.

    Another change that's sweeping the captive hummer world is the production of a ready mix nectar. One that the curators of the hummer exhibits and naturalists are excited about and are using as we "speak" in many control groups of the little birds. And of course, along with the nectar,they raise fruit flies for them.

    Spring is such fun!! LQ
     
  5. Jane in southwest WI

    Jane in southwest WI Well-Known Member

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    For cleanning the hummer feeders, I have heard that soap should not be used, but the feeders should be disinfected in a solution of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water and rinsed thoroughly. I plan on doing this before I put the feeders out for the season (hummers aren't here yet but I expect them any day now). Once they're here, I have to refill the feeders so often that rinsing the feeder well with warm water between refills is good enough.

    I am not sure why soap would be bad, maybe because it can be hard to rinse every trace.
     
  6. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) People "hear" a lot of things Jane. But when the premier wildlife biologists, ornitholigists, students and breeders of Hummers give guidelines it's good to pay attention.

    And you don't HAVE" to keep the feeders filled and out all of time as per the above posts. ;) Although it's fun for sure.

    Have fun..they surely are a delight..the little devils! LOL I wonder sometimes how we would be talking about them if they were, say, the size of turkey vultures! :eek: LOL

    LQ
     
  7. june02bug

    june02bug Well-Known Member

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    I usually agree with leaving them but the baby we now have would've been eaten before my eyes and I can't take that. So we are raising her at least until old enough to go back. (I have also help raise an orphan deer... with permission from wildlife officer and vet advise.) While I am not a professional rescuer I am experienced in raising many different critters.


    And yep Hummers are very cute. Unfortunately the only ones I've seen lately have been on the road... you know those $80,000 ones. :rolleyes: