Spiders

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mrs. Vet, Sep 12, 2006.

  1. Mrs. Vet

    Mrs. Vet Well-Known Member

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    I have a huge amount of fabric stored and every time I open a box I find spiders have invaded. Any suggestions on what to put in there to keep them out? :shrug: I remember my grandmother used lavender a lot, would that work?
     
  2. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Get better boxes. Spiders are one of the most common pest problems, and they prefer getting into spaces like you described. I don't recommend using lavender or any chemical sprays inside the boxes. You could use something like Ortho Home Defense which is a pyrethroid that lasts for several months on the outside surface of the boxes, but I don't recommend using it inside a box where it would get on the fabric. The spray on the outside is a repellant and would lessen the number of spiders that got inside. It has a low toxicity, lasts a long time and works well. I usually recommend it for the outside of the house, but it would work well in crawl spaces, basements, and storage areas. Because of the low toxicity I would even use it for bed bugs too.
     

  3. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I have heard that spiders are canibles. Buy a tarantula, and keep it in there,lol it will eat the other spiders, and you will only have one spider to deal with.
     
  4. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    They say hedge apples will keep them away...I think you put them around your house,spiders don't like them. I'm not sure if it's true or not,but I would like to get some for that purpose.
     
  5. brouwer

    brouwer Well-Known Member

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    Hedgeballs or Hedge apples work great. I can't wait until they come out in the stores in our area. Just set them on a piece of tin foil and within days the spiders are gone. I don't know why you need the tin foil but that is what makes it work.
     
  6. MWG

    MWG Well-Known Member

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    :rock: :rock: :rock:
     
  7. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    They sell them in stores where you live? Huh,that's interesting. Maybe they sell them here and I just never noticed.
    Thanks for the tip about the foil,I didn't know that :)
     
  8. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Didn't know I had a marketable commodity in all my hedge apples!!!!!!!! Know they do work as we use them in our cellar which used to be a place I'd never go...wish they worked on snakes. DEE
     
  9. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Start buying those rubbermaid totes and using them for storage. The seal tight and no spiders will get in nor meeces either.
     
  10. FiddleKat

    FiddleKat Mother,Artist, Author Supporter

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    How about those airtight containers. I had got some before that were a decent size that held about 10 pounds of dog/cat food in them. Actually that is what they were sold for as pet food containers.
    I used mine to keep bags of chips, crackers in the pantry to keep the ants out and it worked. They also work well if the containers are stored in a basement or shed where their might be moisture too.
     
  11. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    I don't care about spiders, but airtight containers are also a smart idea to avoid moths! :cool:
     
  12. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    What are hedgeapples and where can I get a truck load. Little Buggers (spiders) keep moving into my kitchen and bathroom. Not so bad except the like to rappel down on me while I have something sharp in my hand. Scares hubby to death when I start swinging :)
     
  13. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Those spiders may be eating moths or other insects that may be trying to eat your fabrics. Moth larvea are what eat woolens. Those spiders are probably your friends!
     
  14. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    That's why I leave the ones in the corners of my ceiling alone as well as other out-of-the-way places. The one on the underside of my closet shelf is a very busy fellow looking at her web. Can't tell what she's caught, but something tells me I'd rather have her than them!
     
  15. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know a lot about clothing moths, and I can tell you that spiders are not adequate to get rid of them. Miller moths are not clothing moths. Clothing moths can lay eggs that produce the larvae that eat the wool, or fur, or silk, in layers that the spiders cannot get into. They also make a type of webbing that would exclude spiders. Clothing moths are a difficult pest to exterminate. I would recommend that the risky material be dry cleaned and then placed in a heavy duty plastic bag with some moth balls. They last about 6 weeks and will kill the larvae. The bag should be sealed tightly and double bagged. Moth balls are dangerous. The benzene gas that comes off can cause brain damage. So it is not good to be able to smell it where you use it. Stuffed animals, old upholstery, and old carpet are also at risk. Old furniture often has matting that is made of horse hair that is also at risk. Trophy animals that hang on the wall or stand up are also at risk.
     
  16. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    Long time storage of textiles in plastic damages them. Something about the plastic emiting fumes which breakdown the fabic.

    Hugs
    marlene