Spend your money locally

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jgbndaudio, Feb 1, 2005.

  1. jgbndaudio

    jgbndaudio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Howdy,

    "Remember to spend as much of your money as you can on, locally produced goods and services that are sold through locally owned businesses" as this will help strengthen the economy in your area. The more money you circulate in any given area, the more tax dollars that are rasied from it. Buy Local and bring your own cloth bag!
     
  2. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,325
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    I would certainly agree about showing preference to locally produced goods assuming they are of good quality. However buying the same old foreign goods at a higher price is simply welfare to support another layer of middlemen. (Unless extra service or convenience is worth it to you.) Personally how some extra layer of local middleman makes his boat payment is not my concern. I can use those extra dollars as well as he can.
     

  3. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,844
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2002
    Location:
    central idaho republic
    NO buy local and ask for paper sacks...... support a logger and their families.


    William
     
  4. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,857
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    I am with Hermit, Where you buy isnt as important as what you buy. We have a local store that sells misc items including tools. Ill never buy tools from them. They are cheap chineese made item with a local middleman.

     
  5. jgbndaudio

    jgbndaudio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Hello,

    Where you buy is equally important as what you buy and here's why.

    If you buy an item from store A (chain box store that's not a locally owned) a percentage, lets call it X = (local labor, rent, etc.) will stay in your area. However if you buy a similar item (or the same exact item) at store B (locally owned), then the amount that stays in your area is larger than X for store A.

    This is true because the owners profit stays local. You must also take in to account that store A is more likely to own their own building which means the rent does not stay locally. In fact if store B is owned by the owner or another person or business that lives in the area that rent stays local.

    Now take this a step farther. If that owner then goes out and buys something locally, that money gets taxed again, generating more income for your area.
    If you could get a number of people in an area to understand and practice this concept, you could raise the standard of living for all residents of this area at very little cost to the community.
    Scotty
     
  6. Thoughthound

    Thoughthound Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    280
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Location:
    Iowa
    I clearly see both sides of this argument and believe low cost will always win out over loyalty, especially on big ticket items.

    How many times has a WalMart come to a town and then left for lack of business?

    You can blame it on people, but that is the nature of capitalism. Local owners need to find a competitive edge, like offering valuable expertise that WalMart doesn't.
     
  7. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,622
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    Maine
    Yeah-then you support the local boy who runs the bulldozer at the landfill they get tossed into.

    Hire a local seamstress to sew your bags out of locally-crafted fabric. I know, splitting hairs.


    Hey jgb-who were you a roadie for? If it's anyone of consequence I might have seen you around, as I do production catering.
     
  8. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Thank you, my dad's a logger. Our sole source of income.
     
  9. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    No, then you use mulch/compost them and enrich your garden.
     
  10. jgbndaudio

    jgbndaudio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Hello,

    Yes, paper bags are acceptable, provided you use them again in some fashion. I just meant don't get plastic bags whenever you can avoid it. Many people don't realize that plastic bags are a petroleum product. Hence if we want to cut our dependence on oil, we must also cut our plastic bag use as well. One thing that always drives me nuts is when someone buying only one item (usually a six pack or a gallon of milk) carries it to the checkout with the products handle. Only to have the store employee (or themselves) automatically put it in a bag and maybe even double bag it! Now I realize in some states beer must be bagged, but I've never been to a state where that law applied to milk!
    Scotty
     
  11. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,622
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    Maine
    You're right-I do, but 99% of the population doesn't, hence the landfill allusion.
     
  12. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,025
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kitsap Co, WA

    It's more integrated than that: Walmart comes into a town, knocks local businesses out by underselling because they can get items more cheaply (bigger orders/volume discounts and having the clout to import directly from overseas with cheap labour costs.) And also, they know that if they put the individual businesses out of action, they can they raise prices AND get their workers for less, because the individual companies have gone under. The workers work for less because it's the only game left in town, and because they work for less, they can only afford to buy at Walmart -- the company store. The wages of the workers are devolving back into the coffers of the corporation, becoming a more and more closed system, and then the stockholders & corporate officers rake off the profits (dividends) from the top -- and they are not living in the local community and spending their money supporting bulldozer drivers or teachers, etc...

    Entrepreneurs are also an example of the nature of capitalism: it doesn't have to be all about bigger, bigger, BIGGER.
     
  13. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    I try to buy locally when I can. I also like to buy domestically produced products from the local retailers when I can. I insist that the domestic produced product is quality for which I don't mind paying a bit more than the knock off import stuff. I feel we should help support our domestic workers and services. The big box stores have their place, but so do the specialty stores that can help you locally...like the local feed store, bait shop, home cooked local non-franchised restaurants, local craftsmen, etc.
    I also think that I save in the long run by going to smaller local stores that can help you as you buy what they offer and not add to a realm of junk from the big stores that feels like just because you push this shoppiing cart, that you have to feel like filling it with new junk (that eventually turns to stored junk). Of course the local feed store has a few enticing items sometimes like those swiss imported chocolates that I REALLY need. :haha:
     
  14. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,266
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    So, I want to buy a hammer.

    No one forges steel locally. nor do they turn handles locally.

    There is no retailer here that is not affiliated with Kmart, Ace, Tru-Valu, etc. etc. etc.

    Some of the hardare stores are larger, some are smaller.

    But, all are affiliated with a larger chain, and all sell products manufatured out of my region.


    So, I see no real value in your comments?

    Don't get it.

    Perhaps some of you should come live in my region & make hammers from raw ore & trees, and then I could buy one.

    Otherwise, this is all a futile exersize with a lot of talk but no results..... No one supporting this idea is actually doing it! :)

    --->Paul
     
  15. jgbndaudio

    jgbndaudio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Hello,

    Well actually Paul I support the idea and do it when I can! That's the key. When you can. As an example, I would say more than half of the produce I buy is grown within NY state. Yes, I may pay more at smaller farm stands than at shoprite or wherever but at least I'm not sharing that money with a trucking company that is likely located somewhere else. There will always be things that aren't made locally. I like Banana's but I know that I'll never buy a banana that was grown in New York.
    Scotty
     
  16. KindredCanuck

    KindredCanuck In Remembrance

    Messages:
    304
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2003
    Location:
    Greatest country in the world... CANADA
  17. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    99% of the population doesn't use cloth bags either. :)
     
  18. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,464
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Everything around here is a third higher than in the city.Except Lumber and bulk Spices.

    Because most stuff has to be shipped in,and Labor cost is higher.Because of it being Mennonite Community.

    big rockpile