Specs on Ford 861 Powermaster

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by shelbynteg, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    Beasley, Tx
    Looing (still) for a tractor, this one came up nearby, diesel with 3700 hrs, tires appear fair, sheetmetal good, appears well cared for.

    I can't find what the horsepower on this model is. Can it move round bales? I;m pretty sure it has live PTO. The other thing I really need is mowing mowing mowing....

    Any input on this model of tractor is appreciated. Owner is firm @ $4000.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Zack

    Zack Well-Known Member

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    Tx / Ms zone 8A

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    The 861 (871/801) were manuactured 57-62. Both gas & diesel. Both 172 CID, gas had 50 PTO D-E HP, diesel 44. Some models were 5/1 and some 10/2 (high/low option). Weight 3,090 to 3,390. Average auction prices a couple of years ago were a low of $2,750, high of $3,450 and average of $3,200. If you can find the serial # I can tell you the year. Price seems a bit high based on this if it doesn't come with implements.

    Don't know about you other question aspects.

    Ken S. in WC TN
     
  4. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    Ken,

    The Fords of that vintage had diesel engines in two types. The 144 CU in produced the HP you stated. The more common version is teh 172 Cu in diesel that generated 53 HP. I have a '59 801 with the 172 engine.

    Here in N. Calif that price would be quite reasonable.

    bearkiller
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a 960 gas. Basicly the same tractor, they plumbed yours for diesel and it sits lower to the ground.

    Mine struggles with 5x6' round bales, but it would handle 4x5 bales real well.

    The '6' in the model tells us it is a 5 speed with live pto - the best of their models.

    Stay away from the SoS automatic trannies - they worked quite well in their day, but are a REAL money pit these days when they need repair.

    I'd probably prefer a gas, they only just converted the block over - but they work pretty good.

    For that money it better have power steering (a popular option) and be in real good condition. More common is $3000 around 'here'.

    --->Paul
     
  6. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    I feel like I should be able to guess what this is, but I can't...just any automatic tranny on this tractor, or is SoS 'special'??
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Yes, at least some Ford tractors had the equivalent of an automatic transmission on them. I had a Ford 4000 with one (Select-o-speed - aka select-o-sucker). Spent more to have it repaired than I spent on the tractor initially. Problem is finding someone to do the repairs. As far as I know there is only one guy left in the U.S. who can overhaul one. Do not even consider buying one of these - been there - done that!

    Ken S. in WC TN
     
  8. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, John Deere took it apart and turned it into 'their' very popular power shift tranny. Ford had a good idea, and it works fine as advertised. They have 3 cluch setups inside, & as you move a cable, different gears are put in use.

    The problem is that once it's worn, you have 3 times the parts to replace; and while using it there are 3 times the parts to maintain which many people don't do.

    As Ken said, finding someone who knows how to do the work is becoming difficult. NH is dropping some of the parts support for the older SoS trannies. What's available is expensive. Doing the labor takes longer.

    Added all up, the SoS works great, but unless you know how to do the work yourself & how to stumble upon parts, it becomes very expensive to keep running.

    Most folks actually like the machine, so they keep it until something goes wrong - then try to dump it.

    Therefore, if anyone is _asking_ about an SoS tranny Ford (the middle number is a 7 or 8 in the 100 series - 971, 871, etc.) they probably don't know enough about them to buy one & keep it going cheaply - it will be a money pit - any tranny 40 years old is going to need some work soon, if not now.....

    --->Paul