Sore dog ears

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TnMtngirl, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. TnMtngirl

    TnMtngirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My brother has 2 small breed dogs,one of them has sore ears all the time.He has taken it to the vet,the medicine costs 40.00 a bottle.I suggested olive oil to clean its ears.does any one have any ideas on a cure ?Apparently there is infection in the ears because they have an odor.Mary
     
  2. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The dogs have ear mites (most likely). Best thing to get rid of them is mix white vinegar with water...1 part vinegar to 2 parts water...soak a cotton ball in this, squeeze out most of the liquid and swab ears, then massage base of ears with fingers. Do twice a week until swab is no longer pink (bloody) and dogs are comfortable. Works better than anything anyone sells.

    Do NOT use q-tips...dogs' ear canal is different and you can puncture their eardrum. Do NOT leave untreated, as a bad infection can develop.

    Frogmammy
     

  3. mountain granny

    mountain granny Well-Known Member

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    Great advice frogmammy.

    My old country vet told me about using a vinegar/water solution. He also stressed never to use Q-tips on to clean inside a dog's ears.
     
  4. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    yeast infections are not uncommon in dog's ears, especially of they have floppy ears. vinegar and water work great as does listerine and water or my all time favorite 'Tea Tree Oil' and water (but only about 10 drops to 8 ounces of water)

    I use any of the above every day for 10 days then 2 times a week. I use either an eye dropper on small dogs or a bottle with a pointed tip on my larger dogs. Take the dog outside and squeeze the liquid into the ears the dogs first reaction is to NOT let you do this and shake his head. What you want to do is get the liquid down into the actual ear which is located farther down the ear then you think. To get the liquid into the ear canal, hold the dogs head and rub behind the ear, working it way down. Then look out cause the dog will shake his head and yuck will come out all over (why you do this outside).

    To help dry up the ear a little rubbing alcohol can be added to the vinegar/water solution. Alcohol helps dry up the ear.

    There are solutions you can get for your dogs at livestock supply stores. EarEase comes to mind.

    Just remember the dog is not gonna like this! not one bit! I give a piece of cheese in one hand and squirt in the other! and rub quickly trying to divert their attention. Fortunately with my dogs...they are serious (focused) cheese dogs!
     
  5. SarahPrescott

    SarahPrescott Member

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    The dog probably DOES NOT have ear mites. Ear mites are extremely common in cats, and extremely rare in dogs. Especially since you say the ears have an odor. What color is the discharge? Yeast infections are usually brown, but can occasionally be yellowish. This type of infection is usually the most smelly and can be either dry or moist. Bacterial infections are usually pretty moist, can smell, and often there are ulcers in the ear canal. Ear mite infestations are usually dry crumbly brown material and do not smell.

    Ears can be cleaned with a combination of vigear and water (this helps to make the pH of the ear more acidic and unfriendly to yeast and bacteria). To get more "gunk" out, hydrogen peroxide works well because it will foam the stuff up out of the ear. If you use one of the commercial products a foaming cleaner works good for lots of gunk, followed by one of the rinses. Some products are a combination of foaming and rinsing. My personal favorite is made by Oxyfresh--expensive by definately worth it (I have goldens, so deal with ears a lot).

    If the dog does have an infection, the medicine is needed to get the problem cleared up, then cleaning as often as needed (maybe 2-3 times per week!) will help keep the ears under control.
     
  6. second_noah

    second_noah Local Yokel

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    You got it! :D The dog more than likely has a yeast infection and I agree with those who suggested the alcohol/vinegar solution as well as other commercial products. But as previously mentioned, if this is a yeast infection you're going to need the prescibed meds to clear it up. Baytril is a common antibiotic used for this and it usually knocks it out. BUT you're going to have to keep the ears CLEAN if you don't want it to reccur and sometimes even that doesn't help especially in dogs like basset hounds and other long eared or floppy eared breeds.

    Yeast infections cause an odor(sometimes a nauseous one at that)and you will notice maybe a bit of light brown waxy looking stuff but the only way to determine for sure is to do a swab of the ear, stain it and look for the blooms under the microscope.

    Earmites are more common in cats than dogs. Mites produce 'mite poop' which looks like black crusty gunky wax in ears. Cerumite or Tresaderm is usually what we would give folks to treat that and it's no where near $40 bucks a bottle.

    In all my years as a vet tech I was never cautioned about using ear swabs in cleaning dog ears. The best way to start is to use a bit of gauze or other absorbant cloth and your ear cleaner and use your finger like a swab to get down in the ear and wipe off the flap. If the build up is bad you can use an ear swab to get in all the little VISIBLE nooks and crannys, just don't stick it down into the ear canal. There is are a couple products that work off the same principle that you may be able to get OTC called Otomax and Deramax ointments. They work well as ear salves. You can also use warm water and a bulb syringe to really clean the ears out well. That's where the cleaning solutions and drying solutions come in handy.
     
  7. SarahPrescott

    SarahPrescott Member

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    Otomax is a prescription and that may well be the $40 bottle depending on the size of the bottle (that's what we sell a 30g bottle for). A bottle that size should last several normal ear infections though. Deramax is an NSAID, not an ear ointment. Maybe your thinking of Dermalone? Baytril Otic (not the pills) works OK for yeast infections, but it's better for bacterial infections. I like either otomax or tresaderm for yeast or combination yeast/bacteria infections.

    Have you ever heard of Acarexx for ear mites? It's great. You only have to use it once or twice and it works wonders.
     
  8. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    I don't know why you say 'ear mites are rare in dogs' since the vet told my parents (who have owned small, floppy-eared dogs for many years) that any animal with floppy ears is suseptible to ear mites. Their small dog had them off and on for a long time. the vet told them it's more common in dogs than cats, since cats don't usually have the floppy ears.

    Said if you look into the ear and see blackish crusting it could be ear mites.
     
  9. SarahPrescott

    SarahPrescott Member

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    Not to contradict your parents' vet, but did the vet stain an ear swab and look at it under a microscope? Ear mites are extremely unlikely especially if it happened "on and off" for several years. What did they treat it with? Most medicines that treat ear infections can also be used to kill ear mites so if it cleared up with the meds it may well have been an infection. I am a small animal vet and I've seen hundreds of dogs with ear infections and have yet to see one with ear mites! Occassionally a litter of puppies will have ear mites, but most dogs or puppies with brown crusty material in their ears have yeast infections.
     
  10. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    Ge whiz, I don't know.. was years ago...the dog in question has been dead for...gosh...ten or twelve years now?
     
  11. second_noah

    second_noah Local Yokel

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    I had a brain fart. I do know that deramax is an NSAID, I was thinking dermalone and we used it in ears as well as otomax at my clinic, neither of which costed over 10 bucks for the largest tube we had. Chewable Baytril tabs are what were most commonly given in my neck of the woods.

    I have never used Acarexx, but know people who have. They seem to like it. Much easier to use than Cerumite for sure. I like tresaderm myself. We used it for EVERYTHING! I even got ringworm(grr)once and used it on myself and it helped to soothe the itch.
     
  12. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Perhaps the 'common-ness' of dog ear mites varies with locality. They are quite common in the southeast. In fact, I've seen far more of them in dogs than cats. (When I was still a working vet tech) I'd say, however, that the fact that most of the cats we saw were indoor beasties had a bit to do with it. :D

    However, I'm sure that with re-curring ear problems such as you describe, the vet has already checked for mites, and ruled that out, since it's usually simple to do. The yeast does sound like a good possibility.

    Good luck with it.
     
  13. TnMtngirl

    TnMtngirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank you all for the information,I sure learned a lot,and will pass it on to my brother.Mary
     
  14. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    I have used an over the counter treatment (GyneLotrimin) on our Pug's yeast ear infection. It worked well! The vet was not terribly pleased to lose the sale, but she did admit that it should work.
     
  15. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    The one who posted about an antibiotic is right on the money. I worked at a vet clinic for almost 5 years and once you do the cleaning you can pack the ears with a Baytril ointment. The Vet makes this at his office. He grinds up Baytril tablets and mixes it with a vasaline base. The ears are cleaned, dried with the liquid drying ingredient and then packed with the Baytril ointment. An antibiotic can also be given orally at the same time. This sounds like this yeast infection is very ongoing and will take some tending to get him over it. My Rotty had yeast in one of her ears and it was several weeks of getting her over it. A continued infection can cause deafness not to mention the continued pain. If your vet has a problem finding a good "recipe" for this mixture tell him to call Dr. Joan Ree at Tender Paws Vet Clinic in Willis, Texas. Good luck.
     
  16. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Is it possible the dog has allergies?
     
  17. Immaculate Sublimity

    Immaculate Sublimity Seriously?

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    Yes I have the best stuff I also checked with the vet and it is 100% safe.
    We were at the point of surgery I asked the vet to give me two weeks on this
    stuff and it is was not drastically better we would go ahead with the
    surgery he could not believe this was the same ear....

    Blue Powder Ear Treatment

    INGERDIENTS:

    16 oz. Isopropyl Alcohol

    4 Tablespoons Boric Acid Powder

    16 Drops Gentian Violet Solution 1% (you will need to ask for this and the
    Boric Acid it is kept behind the counter)

    You will need to shake solution every time you use it to disperse the Boric
    Acid Powder. Purchase the "Clairol" type plastic bottle to dispense
    solution to affected ears. Warm solution before putting in the ear.

    Solution appears to work well on any and all ear treatment problems from
    mites to wax to canker. The success rate for this treatment is said to be
    95-99%. Those who do not succeed have usually not done the treatment long
    enough or have not been regular about it.

    This solution is also effective for treating fungus-type infections on the
    feet and elsewhere on the dog, for cuts on dogs or people and for hot spots
    For external use only and do not be into the eyes.


    TREATMENT

    Evaluate condition of ears before treating and if very inflamed and sore.

    Do not attempt to pull hair or clean out the ear at all. Just flush and
    ten wait until inflammation has subsided, which will be about two days.

    Warm the solution and shake the bottle each time before using.

    Flood the ear with solution (gently squirt bottle.)

    Massage gently to the count of 60, wipe with a tissue.

    On first treatment, flood the ear twice, wipe with a tissue and leave alone
    without massage.

    The dog will shake out the excess, which can be wiped with a tissue.

    Note: the Gentian Violet does stain fabrics.


    THE SCHEDULE OF TREATMENT:

    Treat 2x per day for the first week to two weeks, depending on the severity
    of ears.

    After the 2nd or 3rd day, you can clean out the ear with a Q-tip or cotton
    balls.

    Caution: when using a Q-tip, only insert it as far into the ear canal as
    you can actually see. Use care to prevent the gunk from falling down into
    the ear canal.

    Treat 1x per day for the next 1-2 weeks.



    Treat 1x per month ( or even less frequently, depending on the dog).
     
  18. logcabn

    logcabn Well-Known Member

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    Hi I was looking through the dog threads, because I also have a lab with an ear problem (one ear only), she also chews her feet and has some flakes on her back. As I was doing a web search I came across quite a few stories about a powder called "Thornit powder" it is avaible from www.championpets.co.uk It sounds like a wonder drug compareded to everything my vet has had me try, and for around 13 dollars canadian I'm not really out anthing. I'll let you know how it works out.
     
  19. Rouen

    Rouen Well-Known Member

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    if it's indeed an infection a swimmers solution usually helps, that's what we use on our cocker whom tends to get severe infections unless his ears get cleaned every night
    swimmers solution:
    50/50 white vinegar/70% isopropyl alcohol

    used a bottle with a nozzel squeeze some of the mixture into the ear, enough to slosh around, massage the cannal from the outside by the cheek you should hear the mixture inside the ear as you massage it, if done right the dog shouldn't react much if at all, then insert a cotton ball into the cannal, massage a couple times, remove cotton ball insert another cotton ball massage again to soak up the rest of the mixture then go to next ear if nessisary.

    thats what our vet recomended for our cocker - he hasn't had an infection in almost a year and a half.
    hope that helps.
     
  20. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is what I recommend for humans with repeated external ear canal infections and what was successful for our spaniel mix when she had this sort of problem. Though in my dog I used only vinegar because I find personally the alcohol burns a bit- she might've objected more than I did (I use it whenever my ears get itchy usually after moisture from swim or long warm shower/bath or sleeping too warm at night). The vinegar acidifies and helps ear fight yeaast and bacterial infections, the alcohol dries the ear out of any collected moisture. Also I would try (would last a few minutes sometimes) to clip the dog's ears up so they could dry out a bit inside.