Sometimes I dont know why I keep trying lol

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by FarmboyBill, Aug 14, 2006.

  1. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ive spent a month in odd bits of time trying to get my baler running. Finally did so, and thought all was ready for the big day. Now that the hay is cut and raked, the fuel pump wont, and theres no way much around that. I can get a neighbor that owes me to round bail it, but I so wanted to do it all myself. Oh well. I got a pto attachment that ill put on next year and do away with the dang engine.
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Good luck Bill. Best to give that baler a good test run way ahead of hay baling time. Sometimes the knoters on older balers can drive a person stark raving mad. Be sure they are shiny clean with no rust.
     

  3. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    Well, I reckon I learned something this morning... that some balers had engines on em... Bill I never seen or heard of one of those kind of balers... all of em I'm acquainted with worked off of pto's...

    Just think about all of that 'spare idle time' that baler saves you from... :)
     
  4. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Went out to do some mowing on Saturday and partway through the first field, the rear Universal joint shattered on my JD5 mower. Now I have to try and find parts I can afford. Then I decided to mow the lawn. The riding lawnmower engine blew. I got out the push mower. It won't run even with hi octane gas. I got out the old push mower. It runs and then stops( gas line blockage) I slept Sunday.
     
  5. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    Ive heard that a lot of amish use horses to pull balers that have engines on them.
     
  6. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Thats what they do here.

    big rockpile
     
  7. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Neighbor came down and bailed the fields got 9 big bales. Thats a record for MANY years I think 7 was tops , but he dsosent like to get his teeth dirty and left some on top, so I went back and reraked it, including this time the big garden with the Johnson Grass, and a piece that was full of JG and Lambs quarter 6ft tall. i think ill have a doz bales thereabout, and at $5.00 a bale, thats a bit of money. I found a universal electric fuel pump here, and b bypassed the pump on the engine. Got the battery from my truck and mounted it tight and ran wires from the pump, over the engine and down to the battery. Spent a 1/2 hr trying to get the hammermill belt to line up on the tractor to the engine pully, and when i finally did, and it started running, before I ccould get to the battery and hook up one wire---------- the belt broke. I noticed a pain in my right lower side, and came in and took a baby asprin and decided to wait a hr before trying it again. Ill keep ya posted.
     
  8. Hammer4

    Hammer4 Well-Known Member

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    FarmBoyBill, what tractor and baler are you doing all this work on?
     
  9. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    All the balers had engines on them in the good ole days. All of them used baleing wire. No twine bales. They also required a man on either side of the bale chamber to shove the wires through from the left side, and the guy on the other side twisted the ends together. Case was one of the more popular ones with a Wisconcin V4 air cooled engine on top up front. I got 2 cents a bale to shove in the needles and stick the wires. The guy on the other side tying them got 1.5 cents per bale. One dang dirty job. The owner charged 11 cents per bale for custom baling. The bales were longer and a bunch heavier then the twine tied bales today.
     
  10. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Uncle Will, im assuming u met u shoved in the blocks, not the needles. WELL, as they said on Cool Hand Luke, (A mans got to know his limitations). I finally cut a V belt that attaches to the inside of the flat belt pulley on the crankshaft of the Case air cooled engine that runs the baler. It twice I cut it with the hammermill belt I was using off the tractor to try and start it.. At that, I threw in the towel. I called the neighbor and asked him to come down and bale the rest of it when he has time. dawgs, I hate it when I lose. Oh well. Im 30 days late in picking corn, so onto another challange. Should have much better luck there.
     
  11. Gercarson

    Gercarson Well-Known Member Supporter

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    FarmBoybill - I'm sorry that "things" aren't ideal for you - just reading your posts make me sooooooooo homesick and envious of your problems - even though you're having problems and such, it all sounds like heaven to me. Keep up the very, very good work.
     
  12. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Bill
    The really old time stationary balers used the blocks to seperate the bales. They were wood and the ones I remember were dropped in from the top of the chamber while the plunger was on the backstroke. The newer 1930s t0 1950 era balers had pickup reels and baled the hay out of the windrows the same as now. These had 2 steel needles that each had a pair of H shaped tracks. You placed the needle in a spring loaded carrier that had a handle grip on it to pull it back out when it automaticly was tripped to shove the needle into the bale. The needle went right down the bale chamber with the bale. two sets of wires were shoved through the bale in the H shaped tracks. As soon as the next needle was shoved through the bale you had to jerk the one going back the chamber out of the hay and stick it in the spring loaded carrier.
    These old balers were much more dependable than the fully automatic newer types that put two farm boys out of a summer job on the dirty old baler.
    Any small farm tractor common back then could pull the baler with a wagon hooked behind it.
     
  13. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ive pitched to a stationary and know how its run, and ive rode on the back of a pull type and inserted the wires in the blocks, but thats it., Never saw any needles on a hand tie machine, but then I probably aint seen 3 hand tie pull types in my life. I called the bailer man to ask if he got my recorded message that he could come over and bale what I had raked and reraked after he had been here the first time., He said yes, hed be over in a little bit. Will, in a little bit, it got blue black out with the clouds drawing water from alot of places. Then it got to thundering bad. after awhile here he comes quick time. Well we get 2 bales, making the total 10, as I said earler. Well all the time he was baling, the wind was blowing, the air was almost cold and there was a sprinkle of 10 drops an acre. Well, he finished and went home about an hr ago, It was like God was saying Get yerazz in gear, cause now its raining steady and theres hardly any thunder at all. Ill tell u another story. Dad always tells this one every time I go up to Kan to see him. (Man named Harvey Hewins drove a tank truck for Standard back then. Harvy was a BIG boy. One day he was passing a field and the farmer was tinkering by the baler while the 2 hired hands was under a shade tree. Harvey stopped cause the farmer was a good customer, and asked, what the hells goin on. The farmer said, well, these guys think they should have a break ever 2 hrs or so, and so here we are. Harvey told him to start up and lets go. They went around the field a couple times, Harvey tying BOTH sides and running it by himself. When they got back to the tree, harvey walked over to the guys and asked, Now do you S>O>Bs think you can run it that good, looked at them a bit and left. Good story. Ill have to ask dad if he remembers who the farmer was