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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In most of the goat pictures they are wearing collars. I'm so afraid of strangulation/choking that I won't let mine wear a collar. Is there a reason for them to wear it...just curious :)
 

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My kids have hooves
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Mine wear collars, but I have misgivings about it. I keep an ongoing watch for anything they could get hung on, and this past spring I took the collars off for a month or so as the treeline along their fence was greening up. Once they ate the treeline back, I put the collars back on. Still have conflicted feelings about it, though.
 

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I use plastic chain collars that are SUPPOSED to break. I HAVE had some really flighty goats break them when they've lunged away, but those have usually been the baby collars (smaller links). However, I share the concern.
 

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Though I share the concern, the risk out weigh the benefits since the few key bell wearers here are my method of keeping track of them in the woods, plus act as alarms, if something gets past the donkey that could care less about the goats I would be awakend to the noise. My head goat, the wanna be head goat and the bottem goat all have bells on, any new goats just get collars that way I know I can catch them if I have too, horns are not always easy to hang onto.
 

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I echo Jyllie's concern. My goats have no difficulty getting into trouble. I had a cat once who wore a collar until somehow she managed to get her jaw stuck in the collar. Thankfully, I was home and came to her rescue. I'm sure she would have broken her jaw trying to free herself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I put them on when I take them to the bus stop, but when I see how wild the little ones are I just get this vision of them jumping and hanging themselves. When I first got my goats I put collars on them but I kept finding them on the ground and I realized that they were breaking them somehow and it must be by getting caught on something. So...I just didn't buy any more. My buck still has one on because quite honestly I can't figure out how to get it off :D . I bought him with it on and haven't had any issues with him getting caught on anything and it really does come in handy when he's in rut and I need to get him in control.
 

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I had a goat strangle herself on a collar with just a little twig on the ground. If they can do it, they will... so no, no collars here, not even breakables. I use them when I walk them from point A to point B only then immediately remove them.

Cricket
 

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We had a collar on our first, Sandy, and I didn't think a lot about it until the vet who misdiagnosed her as having tetanus said that he has seen goats with tetanus from skin broken under the collar. When I removed her collar, I noted a lot of bare skin and some scratches in the collar area (it wasn't too tight, I was sure of that). I now look at this the same way I look at halters on a horse, I just put them on if needed and take them off when I am done. Goats seem to be almost as trouble-bound as horses! I recall one year finding Sid's broken breakaway halter in the middle of the horse field, and wondering what on earth got ahold of him or what he was up against to actually break that thing. I do know I thanked God that he was in a breakaway. I didn't know they made breakaway collars for dogs/cats (I assume that is what you guys are using on the goats)? I also know the horses like to grab each other by the halters and lead each other around, and I am sure ****** (the wether) would pick the babies up like purses and carry them around. I just don't trust it, but my situation is such that they have fenced open area with scrub in the middle so no need for bells.
 

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Ours wear collars...until they lose them.During the summer it is not surprising for the herd to come back from browing on the 80 ares and there be a few collars missing. I buy the cheap nylon collars with the plastic buckles from the dollar stores. They break away when need be.
I couldn't feed the way I do when they are in the barn otherwise since they are clipped at feeding stations. We haven't lost one yet. *knock on wood*
I don't like the bare skin on the tops of their necks though. If I showed I wouldn't keep them on or I would look into the links.
It is far easier to catch a goat with a collar on than one without. Since not all of our does are puppy dog tame, I need a head up in the game when working the herd.
 

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After seeing what can happen firsthand(with a "breakaway" collar), I will *never* leave a collar on my goats. *Maybe* if they lived in a lot. But my girls forage and roam.....not happening here.
 

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Also, if your does have horns, something else to consider. Years ago when I had horned Boers(thankfully, those days are long gone, all disbudded now), I had a horned doe who was fighting with another horned doe who was wearing a collar. She hooked one of her horns through the other does collar and then twisted, trying to get loose. She was stuck tight. Both does panicked and kept on twisting. By the time I managed to get someone to help me untangle them, the doe with the collar was foaming at the mouth and buckling at the knees. If I hadn't been there??:shrug: Collars are an accident waiting to happen.
 

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I HAVE had my does with slightly loose plastic chain collars get their horns hooked into their own collars; good point Ozark...no one choked, but yours was a bit visual.
 

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I've got collars on all 4 of mine~ because I wanted to hang tags on them with our phone number in case anyone escaped. It's been 5 months and no one has escaped (Knock wood they don't start now!) and I am reconsidering the collars because I took my largest doe down to the neighbors two weeks ago and IMMEDIATELY another doe in the neighbors herd got her horns stuck in my goats collar. Luckily~ the neighbor and I were both right there in the moment and whipped the collar off my doe before it could become a problem.
 

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Large dog collars on mine, break away type, easy way to walk them to and from the milkstand...Topside
 

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Those who may be wondering about the ease of leading does to and from the milkstand without a collar......I train all my girls as they freshen to walk beside me with my right arm on the outer side of their neck and my right hand curved under their jaw. After several times they walk very well like this.
Or you can simply use a collar for the amount of time it takes to milk, then take it off.
As for ease of catching them without collars(or horns for that matter), I find it much easier if I have a skittish doe, to catch her by a back leg, than to try to grab a horn or collar. Back legs are easy to grab and much easier to sneak up on than a head with watching eyes.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay...I just have to tell this little story. It's the talk of catching them by the horns that got me thinking about it. We had a goat about 8 years ago...yes 1 goat....and we knew NOTHING about them LOL. She had horns and was always escaping so I told my dd who was about 14 at the time to go out and catch her again. I look out the window and she's grabbing Beth's horns and was trying to keep her in place by straddling her. Well Beth was not going to have any of that and took off with my dd riding her. I laughed so hard and we still get a little chuckle when we think about it. Who needs a horse :D
 

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Also, if your does have horns, something else to consider. Years ago when I had horned Boers(thankfully, those days are long gone, all disbudded now), I had a horned doe who was fighting with another horned doe who was wearing a collar. She hooked one of her horns through the other does collar and then twisted, trying to get loose. She was stuck tight. Both does panicked and kept on twisting. By the time I managed to get someone to help me untangle them, the doe with the collar was foaming at the mouth and buckling at the knees. If I hadn't been there??:shrug: Collars are an accident waiting to happen.
Thank you! I picked up a couple of does several weeks ago. They came with stout nylon collars - and horns. This post finally gave me the impetus to go in and get those collars off of them!
 

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My goats wear collars. It's easier to lead them that way. The milkers get numbers on their collars. My husband refuses to really pay attention to individual does and remember their names, yet he helps care for them. This way if he notices a problem with one of them or I have to give special instructions on a particular goat, we can identify her by number. I use the breakaway p;astic collars on adult does and those collars with the clasps on kids. They fall off before they strangle a goat. I'd rather lose a collar. My goats do not have horns. With horned goats, collars can be more risky.
 

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I use the breakaway plastic chains too. Since we're on milk test, we're supposed to have some kind of easily visible ID on each goat. And since they're Toggs, it can be hard to tell them apart otherwise! They are out on pasture/browse but seem to loose more collars in the hay feeders.

The breakaways break easily. Part of my milk stand has stanchions and the end stalls just have a chain and snap. I have one doe who would break her collar on purpose to get back to the feed area. She has to use a stanchion now. I've had a few collars break while leading angry kids.
Seems like everyone has a different system. I know one breeder who lost one of their top does to a collar accident, and now won't use collars on anything. I know another breeder who keeps nylon choke collars (!) on her does and hasn't had problems. Go figure.
 
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