Something big just happened

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by akmyilee, May 18, 2005.

  1. akmyilee

    akmyilee Well-Known Member

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    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    South Carolina
    My dh came home from work and told me to go and buy some land........???? NOW WHAT? I have looked on Realtor.com and there is land for sale, I found one lot with a small trailer already on it for 12,000$ but it is only an 11/2 acre, I think we want more??? I dont' know??? I think that he is cool with a mortgage under 20,000$ but we are goign to build as we go as far as the house goes. I want to have a garden, chickens and maybe a few cows eventually.....how much land do I need? Is it even possible to have someplace livable by September? I want to homestead but I don't really want to go all wilderness. It would be hard to find wilderness in South Carolina (too populated). WHERE DO I START?????
     
  2. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I have 10 acres, it does just fine. If I could afford to build a barn I would. Most of the time I don't see 6 of the acres, they are wooded and I am busy with new baby. 11 sounds great! Check out what they allow, (Zoning) if you want to sell your farm products.

    As for housing, check out Modular homes, thats what we did. We moved in 6 months after we found our land. That is as fast as you could ever do, I think.
    BTW, we paid 35,000 for our place, just land. That's down from the 50 they asked for.

    I just realized you said 1.5 acres...that is a tiny lot, and expensive. Wait.
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Ah, yes, the eternal question...Where to start?

    One step at a time, is my advice. I'm not certain why so many folks dream or assume a completed homestead, but fact of the matter is, it seldom happens.

    Snatch that small trailer and acre and a half. Live on it, love it, improve it, sell it and buy something closer to your dream.

    Few are lucky enough to find the "perfect" place the first go-around. Some will find that the dreamed for lifestyle isn't for them, others will want more remote acreage.

    Everyone needs to start somewhere, even if it's growing a tomato plant in a five gallon bucket on the communal porch.
     
  4. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    I would shop around a little and talk to your DH and find out what he wants to do also. Get at least 10 acres and more if you can afford it.
    The rule is usually one acre per head of livestock. That depends on the type of live stock of course.
    Good luck! Have fun! :)
     
  5. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Sounds to me like you and DH need to talk a little more about what you both want - otherwise, you're being set up if it doesn't work out.
     
  6. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Slow down. If the land is appreciating quickly, 1 1/2 acres may be good for you if you understand the market and know when to sell. Mobile homes depreciate. If you aren't planning on staying, I'd say pass up the MH. The real value is in the land, well, and septic.

    And, would your husband be willing to move in two or four years to another place? would you consider buying this place and renting it to help you save enough money?

    I agree that you really want ten acres. Land that makes poor farmland often makes good land for grazing. But, if you really want to grow crops, you will be sorry you bought poor quality land. Do a lot more homework. Contact your county's equalization department and find out what land is selling for. Go to realtor's offices to see what is available. Look in the want ads. When does property sell, and when does the price drop? In my area, everything sells in the summer, so after Labor Day, prices become more negotiable.
     
  7. CindyOR

    CindyOR Well-Known Member

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    Jul 23, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    First thing is for you and your husband to sit down and make a list of what you want -
    What is this property going to do for you? Grow vegs? House animals? Large animals or small? No animals at all?

    What do you want in a piece of property? - a creek, pond, flat land, timber, pasture, enough to feed your animals and provide food for your animals by being able to hay?

    Are you willing to drive to get the property you want, or are you more comfortable being closer to town?

    Some things are the same almost anywhere in the country - the closer to town, the more expensive per acre the land will be.

    The mobile, if old, is pretty worthless, so don't just grab the place because it's there. Is the land worth it? Check with a realtor to establish what is reasonable for per acre costs. If you are going to carry a mortgage, go to a lender and get pre-qualified so when you find your dream property you'll be ready to put an offer on it right away - before someone else does.

    Be patient. You'll have your list of things you must have, and then make a list of what would be nice to have. If you want a creek and pond, but the property only has a creek, know that you can make a pond from that. Or be willing to let go of the pond part.

    We put actual offers down on 12 places in the two years we spent looking for just that right place. We were getting desperate - every time we put an offer down we were devastated to lose out to someone else who got there right in front of us, and there were a couple of times where I think there was some shifty stuff going on because we were first and the other people offered more money. We finally found a place that had been up for sale before being purchased by a logging company, and when they finished logging they put it back on the market. Because they didn't want to hold the property for long, they offered to put in a driveway (over a mile long), a septic field and tank, and a 1500 holding tank for water and a well (the well is down the hill and water is pumped to the tank). We paid $67,000 for 20 acres, with two creeks, rolling terrain, 16 miles from town. Our property is backed by BLM land, and has a next door neighbor who has 96 acres. The only other house is on 15 acres. We are up on a hill and look over mountains of timber. We were really glad we ended up with what we have when in 1996 a flood hit our area and almost all the places we thought we wanted to buy ended up under water.

    So again, be patient and you'll make the right choice. But don't just jump out there and buy anything for sale just to have land. Do your homework, and you'll be happy you took the time to do so.

    Cindy Murdoch
    Timberview Farm
    Oregon













     
  8. akmyilee

    akmyilee Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    South Carolina
    Thanks so much for the practical advice...........The only part that I am not patient about is that we are currently living in an apartment and the lease is up in septemeber........sure would like to get out of here by then KWIM??

    Ok, just for the sake of background info.......we own 3 houses already in another town, they are investment properties and are at the least paying for themselves. so that is is kinda like our retirement fund. We are trying to do this as close to debt free as possible, that is why I was thinking live in the trailer and build as we can afford it. The more I think about it though I don't think that 1 1/2 is enough. I have moved ALOT and since dh and I have been married we have moved about every 6 months. I am REALLY TO SETTLE! We have two kids, would like to have more and every move gets harder. As far as what we want to do with the land, a pond/creek would be nice but not really a requirement in my mind. I would like to have a family garden, chickens, and at some point a milk cow. Ofcourse we want a nice house that will fit a large family, but I am willing to do that in peices, like building on as we need to. We are in South Carolina, so getting out far enough from town to make the prices drop dramitically would put us, well in another state.......dh plans to keep his job until we can live on what the REal estate buisness makes, which will be many years down the road.

    I went and looked at a place today, it is a "delevopment" but the lots are huge and the most of the people have several acres and horses, the houses are expensive too so getting quick equity if we do everythign in cash would be nice?? I don't know. DH just came home and we are goign to talk about it when he gets out of the shower........

    Thanks again and any other thoughts are welcomed
     
  9. nappy

    nappy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Aug 17, 2003
    Location:
    Michigan..NWLower
    Be very careful when looking to buy into a "development" that allows residents to own horses. For some odd reason these seem to be the ONLY livestock usually allowed. Forget the chickens, goats, cows, etc. If it is because of odors, flies, or noise, horses can provide all these. Read the fine print because the developments/associations may have rules you must follow. Don't be in too much of a hurry to buy because sometimes mistakes might be made. Enjoy your property hunting. The more acreage you can afford the better. Hope this helps.

    Nappy
     
  10. Conni

    Conni Well-Known Member

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    Apr 29, 2005
    I can understand you wanting to get out of the apt quickly. However, when dh and I looked for our 1 st house (in our case it was our first house)-- we looked at house for 1 yr!!! We made offers on 2 houses in the time that didnt pan out. I remember being disappinted at first. Then we ended buying a 2 acre lot and building our own home for less then some of the homes we were trying to buy!!! So it all worked so nicely. It took another 9 mons to get the house built. So it took almost 2 yrs to get what we wanted. We have lived here 5 yrs now.

    When we were looking for property last yr-- we looked for about 7 mos before deciding on a place. We spent every weekend in the car driving and looking. We went on dh's lunch hour many times to look at places and when dh got off work. It was alot of work! LOL But worth it. We made an offer on one place then the people dcided they didnt want to sell it. :( It was a gorgeous place (116 acres-- we had no idea we'd EVER look at buying that much land. lol). It was a LONG ways from town and right of the blacktop. So we kept going back to this other piece of property-- I didnt like at ALL at first. Dh kept driving me back out too *look*. One afternoon I said out of the blue we should drive up and look one more time at it... The owners were sitting there enjoying the piece and quiet watching their dogs run around. We had never run into them before (long story about that). Anyway, we talked to them for a long time. They were very honest about the place being a dump that they couldnt take care of. lol They both had terrible health issues. :( Long story short- we went out there a few more times and made an offer. The more I went out there the more I liked the place. Kind of wierd, because I remember the first time we drove up the very long driveway-- I said 'We will never buy this place!' LOL Here we are talking about building a home on it.


    So my point it take your time. If you have go to a month by month lease after September then do that... HAve fun looking!! We saw some neat places.
     
  11. Nax

    Nax Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Mar 26, 2005
    Location:
    NW Michigan
    I would reiterate what Nappy said--beware those developments! When I was looking for my property in N. Lower Michigan, it seems that was all the rage. When I would find a nice 5-10 acre parcel, it was inevitably an old farm that the grandchildren, who live in the suburbs downstate, were selling and, essentially, trying to make an exclusive gated community without a gate. They had livestock restrictions (ONLY horses), and they--the people living 5 hours away--had to approve the style of house and house size (no manufactured homes, usually a minimum of 2300 sq. ft.), and outbuilding restrictions. What the heck is the point of owning your own acreage? I wondered. I finally found my God's 7 1/2 acres--an old hayfield surrounded by abandoned spruce plantations, which produces beautiful crops for me and my chickens. I know it's a pain paying rent, so keep looking, it may be possible. I closed on my property in July and moved into my manufactured home on New Year's Day. And S. Carolina cannot possibly be THAT populated? can it?
     
  12. akmyilee

    akmyilee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    183
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    South Carolina
    As far as South Carolina's population, I came out here from Kansas to go to college 7 years ago and it is HUGE difference......in Kansas you can drive for miles and not see a living soul or only a house every few miles or something like that.........I have yet to go a 1/2 with out seeing a house on any road in this state. I don't know much about the upstate (greenville area) but around Columbia and E or W that is what I am finding.

    Ok, the new property that I ran across.........it is 7 acres and is accually kinda close to town, not a delevopment though. It currently has 3 trailiers on it and it is 23,000$........not too bad from what I can tell, if it stops raining this afternoon I am going to drive out there. It is in a nice area and not more than 10 min from the interstate so that is a plus for dh getting to work. If we got this one we would probley live in the nicest of the 3 trailiers til we got somethign built and sell the other two just to get them off of the property. Trailiers/manufactured houses are HUGE around here, they are everywhere, I don't have a problem with them except that they bring down our apprasials if they are around. but the good thing about it is people are willing to buy them/sell them for next to nothing.

    Ok, I'll keep ya'll updated I really appricate your thoughts.

    Conni, I have been reading your posts, good luck to you too.........I'll keep watching to see what you decied :)
     
  13. luvrulz

    luvrulz Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Location:
    Kentucky
    Since you're looking for acreage....check out what www.acreage.com has to offer. Also, we found our property in the back classifieds of Mother Earth News. The realtor was excellent and helped us find 46 acreas for $42k and we've love it!

    Good luck! :p
     
  14. Nax

    Nax Well-Known Member

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    Mar 26, 2005
    Location:
    NW Michigan
    Perhaps turn one of the extra trailers into a chicken coop?
    I really want more chickens, but I can't afford another out building for them right now. When I drive around and see all those abandoned buildings that are rotting away unused, I get jealous.