somebody please help

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by myrandaandkids, Jun 3, 2006.

  1. myrandaandkids

    myrandaandkids Well-Known Member

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    this is realy a pig question, but i need a fast answer and this forum is visited more frequently, i recently rescued a pig from sever mistreatment in the form of physical abuse, days without food or water, locked in the dark under the barn stairs with no room even to turn around, this is horrible, but she is also pregnant! i believe she is due any time and has built a nest, and vulva is swollen, what are the exact syptoms of labor, how long does it last, do i do anything to prepare, also are there any problems that may come to the babies as a result of her mistreatment and if so are they noticable from birth? please help, my mother always takes the potbellies we keep when time nears because the farrowing area is at her home, and she is able to give her full attention in adition to a calmer quieter environment, but she is out of town for a while and this is a large pig and i never even got a chance to be there when the potbellies where born and have no idea what to expect. PLEEEAASSEE HELP!! :help: :help: :help:
     
  2. luvrulz

    luvrulz Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You'll notice her laying around and not doing much - course if she doesn't have much space, she is already doing that, I imagine......

    Is this her first litter? I have never been there for the water breaking and all that, but I'd say that if her vulva is swollen, she's pretty close. Just watch her occasionally and you'll see her deliver her babies. Kind of like a dog, you don't always have to be there 100% of the time. Get some clean rags handy and a bucket of water and you should be ok. Is there an enclosed area you could move her to with a little more room? Might be better for all of you...

    When she delivers the litter, just catch them as they come out and wipe them off and clean them up. When you're done with that, set them aside and be careful she doesn't roll over on them. I don't remember our gilt making noise or anything. We just happened to be in the area and noticed she was in the middle of delivering, so don't be surprised if you miss the first one or two. As long as momma doesn't smash them or they don't drown in a rain puddle/gully washer - they will be fine.

    Their eyes are open immediately and they can nurse as soon as they want. I've had a first litter of 13 and another of 6 here lately, so you never know how many you're going to have. As soon as she's done, she'll pass the after birth and will eat it, YUCK! If you're squeamish about some things, you might want to have a clean pair of cotton or rubber gloves - or dunk you hands in the bucket of water!

    Good luck! They're just the cutest things around a farm! And let us know how you make out!
    :1pig: :1pig: :1pig:
     

  3. oldmanriver

    oldmanriver Well-Known Member

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    Maybe place a heat lamp close by to draw the pigs to. The biggest problem is with her rollin on the pigs That is the purpose of the furrowing crate...The pigs are so cute but beware some mothers are very protective of her babies.. I have seen sows that would attack anything to protect the babies...good luck
     
  4. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's been years since I was around pigs, but I sure do remember that momma pig accidently crushing her babies. My guess is you'd divide the pen with a seperation wall that allows the little ones to go right under, to the heat lamp and away from mom after they eat. Ours always delived unassisted.
     
  5. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    The sow should farrow on her own with minimum problems. Her lack of nutrition is the greater concern. The pigs may be very small and she may even eat them. Obviously you have fed the sow adequately in the time you have had her and her system may accept the fact that she can now provide for the offspring. Once the pigs are born and are dry and warm and nursing I would try to get some additional iron in their system. You can get some liquid iron vitamin at the drug store and liberally pour it over the sows teats. This will enable the pigs to ingest the iron as they suckle.
     
  6. myrandaandkids

    myrandaandkids Well-Known Member

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    thank you so much for your help
     
  7. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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  8. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Pigs aren't all that bright, but due to stubborness, the ability to eat almost anything organic and a high birthrate have been successful for millions of years. The more you interfere with her natural process, the less likely she will be inclined to raise the young. Let her clean up the babies, it's how she bonds with them. If you clean the babies she might think they are yours and so may not want to nurse them. "They Are Your babies, You nurse them!" may be her thought. Don't get freaked when she eats the afterbirth. She's just reclaiming all that protein so she can make milk.

    Plenty of hay, she will hide them in the hay for a week or so. Access to water and sunshine
     
  9. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    I've farrowed thousands of births.

    That sow may turn very nasty if you approach her or the pigs during birth. If she's not in a crate, get a 1/4 sheet of 1/2 inch plywood to keep between you and her as you watch or fool with the pigs.

    She can slash you quick with her teeth.

    Don't be surprised if she has some deaders, due to the stress she's had.

    When one is born, you need to let it struggle against the cord until it pulls free. This struggle is important to clear the mucous from the lungs.

    If one doesn't struggle, wipe the mucous from it's face. That bit of stimulation will open it's airway and cause it to begin the struggle.

    Most pigs clean their own face by rubbing the snout on Mom's rough hide.

    Let things go naturally. They'll eventually find the tits. The next day, you can cut their teeth with a small pair of wire snips. This will keep them from savaging Mom while they nurse, and she is less likely to get sore and kill them.

    If one ventures near Mom's head, watch her reaction. If she ignores it or gently nudges it toward the udder, she'll most likely raise them. If she snaps or bites it...well, that's why they make farrowing crates...to keep her from killing them.

    Good luck!