Some truths about farming

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jen H, Nov 12, 2005.

  1. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    1) The 2 tons of straw you ordered will be delivered 2 weeks early, on a day that's pouring down rain and just after your husband has left for a job consultation. To add to the chaos, the trailer will have developed a flat tire in the driveway and need to be unloaded so the delivery guy can get to his other drop offs. So, you'll hear some comotion, and walk out to find the guy tossing nice dry bales of straw onto the muddy soggy ground in the rain. With no good place to get it under cover because you weren't expecting it yet. And it's got to get under cover so it doesn't wet through and mold. :mad:

    2) The goats will love you for giving them this huge wonderful mountain to play on because the critter barn was the only handy place to get the straw into. They'll be lots of help while you're carrying and bucking. :baby04: The sheep will be kind of confused about the whole thing, but they're confused most of the time so that's nothing new.

    3) Ibuprofen and a hot bath are wonderful things. :bow:

    4) Pallets are incredibly useful, handy things. Grab them whenever you can and hoard them.

    That was yesterday afternoon. Today I get to clear out the bay in the equipment barn where the straw is supposed to go and start getting the bales over there. Just as soon as my arms get limbered up again.
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
    7,102
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    Aah! Farm wives are such usefull women..... :goodjob:
     

  3. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

    Messages:
    3,119
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Location:
    ME
    Sounds like our house! DH orders gravel for the Mom's carport, then spends 2 days working on it, only to put it in the wrong place! Why don't men listen to their wives.....I will never know. Then he puts up driveway markers for the snow plow in the only place we don't need them...the grass. How about marking the DROPOFF??? :shrug:
    Are we the only ones having trouble geting stove pipe? Looks like we might get it in a month, 3 months after we ordered it.
     
  4. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,700
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Missouri
    I know what you mean.
    Ordered hay once and the guy couldn't cut because of no rain and then because of too much rain so DH leaves town for a couple of weeks and you guessed it... the blasted hay came. I bought tarps and stacked it in the yard on pallets and tarped it. then moved as much into the lower part of the barn as I could over the next two weeks. Couldn't get it into the loft as it takes two of us to run the pully system we use. I pulled muscles I didn't even know I had.
     
  5. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    I managed to get the bay where the straw is supposed to go cleared out. It was mostly full of useful bits and pieces of wood, so not too heavy. I got the pallet jacks hooked onto the tractor and found an old pallet to stack the bales on. Drove the tractor on into the critter barn and started to reason with the straw. Not a single bale loaded itself onto the tractor. I tried using the force - nope, nothing budged. I thought about picking a bale up and loading it - and found something else to do.

    I think I'll start that job on Monday and give my muscles a bit of a break.
     
  6. Rachel K.

    Rachel K. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    231
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Dyersville, Iowa
    Doesn't that seem how it works? :rolleyes:
     
  7. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,700
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Missouri
    Oh well, fine! Your a big help! I was hoping that you all could explain to my DH that the scrap wood doesn't go where the hay was suposed to be but now I find that you do it too.Big help you are! :rolleyes:
    Where a stack of bales has been used up that space seems to magicly fill with ods and ends of scrap wood. Not to worry though. DH swears that it will be moved way before next years hay needs to go there. NOT!!!
    The hay is out in the yard under tarps cooling while DH is finding a new place for his scrap wood. Usually a critter stall that is not being used at the time.
    Then he wonders why I am always finding him building or repair jobs to use that wood up. Well go figure! :rolleyes: :)
     
  8. MississippiSlim

    MississippiSlim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    163
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Yep always seems that I am at work offshore when things happen at the house (bobcat killing 2 chickens, water heater bursting, plumbing leaking, etc)

    When I was a kid, jst before we were to plant winter pasture my Dad was called back to work early...no problem...m mom was a farm girl...Then the morning we went to pck up seed and fertilizer the truck broke down! So off we go to the feed store in the 1974 Vega! Yes a half ton of fertilizer will fit in a vega along with an adult and two kids! Of course it is hard to steer! The man a t the feed store said that just after we left a man came in and asked if he could haul a ton of fer. in his 1/2 ton truck. The store owner said "You meet a little white chevy car with its front wheels nearly off the ground?" "She was carrying a 1/2 ton"!!

    Thank God for Farm wives!
     
  9. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    Sorry, Corky. I have no solution for scrap-collecting husbands who fill up every square inch of space. All I've managed is to keep most of the clutter out of the house.

    I actually know for a fact that a Subaru Outback will haul 5 40# bales of hay, 2 goats, and a box of ducklings. All at the same time. The car's still recovering from that trip, but we all made it home!
     
  10. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,700
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Missouri
    Ha! I love it when I read about some other wife that has told their car it is a farm truck and it believes it.
    I had a little mercury tracer hatchback that was my truck for years.
    I now drive a beautiful little sport car. Toyota celica. The men in my family told me they better not find that I had hauled even one bag of feed it it not to mention hay or straw. (dont tell them).
    When I pull up to the loading dock I just say" load it in the silver truck at the dock." They all know which one. :D A celica has a huge trunk and if that is not enough, the back seats lay down. ;)
     
  11. Merrique

    Merrique Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    302
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2005
    Location:
    southern Ohio
    1. Even if it had not rained for a month, the day after your hay is baled it rains for three days.

    2. The baby goats you have been waiting on will pick the coldest, wettest, nastiest day to greet the world.

    3. You can keep alot of cold critters on a back porch under a heat lamp (pig, baby goats, injured bantam chickens, etc.....).

    4. NEVER walk into a field or barn wearing your professional work clothes.

    5. NEVER try to chase to chase goats back into a field wearing nothing but your bathrobe (even if you just got out of the bath). This does provide amusement to passersby when you fall flat into the mud and flash them. :cowboy: