Some questions about lambars..

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Stacy Adams, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    I think I may need a lambar come springtime or else I'll be up to my elbows in baby bottles, but I do have a few questions.. when do you start them on it? I'm assuming I'll need to bottle feed the colostrum to them.?? and in looking at the varoius ones offered for sale, is the gravity fed one better than the one's with the tubes, I mean, don't they suck up a lot of air? how do you keep the milk warm?
    I saw instructions for making my own, but that was a while back when I never thought I'd need one, and now I can't find it.. :(
    eeegads.. three months to go and already I'm panicking !!! :no:
     
  2. Sondra Peterson

    Sondra Peterson Well-Known Member

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    Hi well so far I haven't used a lambar but my friend Vicki McGaugh posted this a couple of years ago. I feed my bottle babies from a pritchard teat the colostrum warm and the first few days but after that they all get cold milk.
    VICKI's statement:
    (I feed very often the first hours of life to make sure they have the whole 20 ounces of colostrum down them, but then its on to bottles, 3 times a day, morning 10am, lunch 3pm and dinner 10pm. About 24 hours most does are smart enough to go on the lambar quite eaisly, most bucks sadly are not, and always need that extra day, and even on the lambar you have to make sure they find the nipple, and just don't spend all day butting the bucket :) Probably by next year I am going to wean myself :) over on to the Premier bucket, friend of mine has it and it is very nice.
    I keep two lambars going, this way one is clean and waiting. I fill the lambar in the house with almost hot milk, take it out and the kids get their full of warm milk, this time of the year I just let it sit out there since it is cool enough that from 10 am to 3 pm it is not going to sour. But during the spring and summer I set out the hot milk, and plunk in two 20 ounce plastic soda bottles that are frozen with ice water, this keeps the milk cool enough to prevent souring. When I come out at 3pm, I have a new clean lambar, take the old one, hose it out, then take it back into the house, a run under the sink with dish soap, a swirl with the washcloth and its ready for the dinner rush! I take them all apart on the weekend and clean the tubes. My friends do the same, only feeding twice a day. Your goal is to have some milk left in the feeder when you replace it with clean. With the milk chilled they drink little sips of it all during the day. Honestly, I haven't seen a decrease or increase in size, no bloat, but the big change is that my kids aren't the running at you rats that they normally are, because they aren't starving between lambars! I have noticed they do not eat their grain as early, I have five 6 week olds, and they are not hardly nibbling any grain, though they eat hay and weeds/clover/browse.

    I agree that the heater is a poor idea, you want to keep it cool, so bacteria doesn't grow. Vicki

    -- Vicki McGaugh TX (vickilonesomedoe@hotmail.com), February 27, 2002. )
     

  3. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mine get a full pop bottle of colostrum each -- and then usually by the second day I start them on a baby lambar bucket -- a very small one with the teats right at the bottom with tiny little straws on them so they don't have to suck long to get milk.

    Once they figure that out, it is a snap to get them on a regular lambar.

    I don't feed chilled milk, mainly because it is normally below zero when we kid. I can't imagine giving cold milk when it is so cold outside. For the same reason, I can't free choice feed milk because it will freeze solid really quick.

    I feed 4x a day the first couple of days, then 3x a day for a few days, and then they go right on 2x a day. They get warm pasteurized milk, all they can drink. I have had no problems doing it this way so far. The girls get their milk first. Boys are rationed if the milk supply is tight.

    Tracy
     
  4. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

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    Stacy,
    I use a lamb bar....I don't know how I would raise kids now without it! It saves tons of time! I also have a livestock/pet supply and I do sell Lamb bars. We make them in 3 gallon and five gallon sizes. The ones that we make are the ones with the tubes that go down into the milk. I have found through trial and error that the kids seem to do best on these. I follow the last post of 4x a day then 3x and so on. If I am feeding babies when it is real warm outside(wish it was warmer) I have ice packs, like the ones that you put in small ice chests, so the milk doesn't quickly sour in the heat(i do feed warm milk). The price on the lamb bars are MUCH cheaper than what some of the goat supply companies charge. We have a 5 gallon 6 nipple bucket for 19.95 and a 10 nipple for 26.95. My business email is m-ssupply@m-ssupply.com I will not be available for the next 3 days but will be happy to get back to you on Monday.

    Thanks,

    Sharon Miller
     
  5. Jan in CO

    Jan in CO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Stacy, I got one a couple years ago, then hubby made me another after looking at the first one. It was either that, or grow another couple arms! I still feed with pritchart teats at first, until they are a bit stronger, as the black nipples that come with the lambbars are pretty stiff. So far, I've just used ones with the holes and nipples around the top, and tubes going into canning jars with milk in them. That way, I can monitor how much each kid or lamb is getting--more or less. If I just put the milk in the bucket, there is no way to tell if one is sucking more weakly, and not getting enough to eat, or if the nipple is malfunctioning, etc. They are EASY to make, and lots less expensive than buying one premade. Just need a bucket with a tight fitting lid, clear tubing which you can buy at the hardware store and cut to size, and the nipples with the straight part that you can insert into holes drilled to size--I think 5/8 inch in diameter, but don't quote me! A tiny brush is helpful, too, and I think I ordered that with the first bucket. If you are super careful about cleaning the tubes and nipples, it's a snap to use. Jan in Co
     
  6. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I actually make my lambars out of my old laundry soap buckets :)

    I used some of those hangers from Premier 1 last year that let's you hang them against a cattle panel, and they worked great!

    Tracy
     
  7. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    Oh wow! Thanks!! Does everyone use Pritchard teats?? I have some latex nipples that I got from Hoeggers can newborns not use them? and what a great idea to put frozen pop bottles in the milk to keep it cool!.. Sondra, do you know if Vicki ever got that Premier bucket? I'd be interested in hearing how it works.. It also seems that the kids don't have a problem with air in the tubes when they suck, maybe it's such a small ammount that it doesen't bother them?
    Tracy, any design info?? I have a ton of buckets, big orange HD buckets, joint compound buckets, square buckets that I keep "just in case".. :) might give me something to do on those nasty days when I don't want to go outside.. :no:
    I'll be checking out Sharon's site too.. maybe another Christmas idea..! :haha:
     
  8. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If I recall correctly, the folks that tried the Premier set up had problems with the nipples leaking. I know they made some design change though?

    I only use the caprine nipples. I keep Pritchard teats on hand just in case, but it makes life a lot simpler to just use the caprine nipples. They don't have any internal valves and are easier to clean. They are easy if you are selling bottle babies too, because they fit right on a plastic pop bottle, so you can just hand one to a buyer and the kid keeps the nipple its used to.

    Not much to design -- it is really simple. Drill holes in your buckets, and pop the nipples through from the inside. You want them to be a pretty tight fit. Now keep in mind that the milk level has to be below the nipples or it will run out.

    Attatch your tubes -- you can order these a foot long from Caprine Supply or Hoeggers, or just buy the correct size at your local hardware store. Shove those onto the inside of the nipples (you'll see how they fit on) and that is that.

    I start the wee babies on little buckets with very short tubes. I hold this between my knees as I sit so that I can use my hands to situate the kids. By using very short tubes, they aren't sucking air. Now, in the older kids, it takes them about 2 good sucks to get milk up ... they really aren't sucking in much air.

    That said, I don't leave an empty lambar out for them to keep sucking on either. They eat and I take it out. That usually takes all of about 3 minutes, lol.

    Those wire hangers I got from Premier are way cool -- they let you use the square buckets on a fenceline. I have the rings welded onto tire rims too, which are nice once they go to the pasture, but these hangers are very nice for in the barn.

    Tracy
     
  9. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    OK!! If you are going to forward my posts from the beginning of time, at least fix the typo's, it sure would make me sound smarter! :)

    I tried the Premier unit at a freinds house, he kidded out about 3 or 4 weeks before me and by that time his Alpines had the nipples leaking already! When you look in the Premier catalog, perhaps it was last year or the year before they started putting their nipples on the top and added tubes ;) So might just as well use the lambar.

    You can purchase your own nipples from any catalog, then take one with you to a hardware store and purchase tubing to fit in the nipple and go to the bottom of whatever bucket you use. Drill holes in your bucket with a 5/8 inch paddle bit, and viola, your own lambar! Make sure and find buckets with lids as the kids get older and they attack you to get to it they can slosh lots of milk out and all over you! Also when you purchase your nipples, get a tube brush!!! I bet my tube brush is 15 years old at least, I did purchase all new grey lambar nipples this last year. I start mine on the lambar nipples put over soda bottles with their colostrum, then move to the lambar. I only need to use Pritchard teats on weak kids, once in awhile a high multiple kid, a quad out of an older doe or a triplet out of one of my 12 month old first fresheners, will not have the best sucking reflex, and the pritchard teats are wonderful! They are too soft and too expensive to be used around here permenently, although when I had my two June doelings to raise I did use them on the two of them, and kept them both on bottles the whole time.

    I could not raise the amount of kids I have without a lambar. Vicki
     
  10. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    So, I want tubing that will fit into where the nippple get's narrow, right? this sounds simple enough.. funny though, with all my buckets, I only found two that have lids (did I throw them away??) :eek: :haha: :eek:
     
  11. Jan in CO

    Jan in CO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The nipples have a little extension inside them that the tubing fits into or over, depending on what type you get. It is MUCH cheaper to get bulk tubing and cut it yourself with an exacto knife or something similar. That way, you have some spare tubing in case you need it. Vicki is right, I don't use the Pritchart teats all the time, either, but do use them on smaller, weaker kids or lambs that can't suck or get their little mouths over those big honkers! It makes life so much easier!

    Jan in Co