Soil Erosion

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Joe in MO, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Joe in MO

    Joe in MO Active Member

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    We just bought our little farm and the bad thing about it is about 15 ft. from the back yard is a huge slope leading down to our creek. My question is how can I build a retaining wall to keep the soil from erroding? I'm thinking because of the cost, to just back fill dirt because it will have to be around 10 ft tall and 25 ft. wide.
    Another question that I have is if it would be better to use dirt to form a "slopping", what would be the best kind of grass to plant to keep the dirt from washing away. I live in KC if that helps any.
    Thanks for your help,
    Joe
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is it just black dirt now, washing away? Does it get a lot of water channeled to it now? Is this a slope, or a gulley? Can it be planted as is, why do you need to add dirt before planting grass? How is the wall going to help things?

    Guess I don't quite understand the issues. I'd suggest just planting it as is and that should help things?

    --->Paul
     

  3. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Shot limestone rock from a quarry would be easiest best method.Probably cheapest also.Just hand place them tight together along the slop.
    As for a wall,Rail road ties work good but cost 10 to 25 dollars apiece.You also have to drill them and drive spikes in to hold them in place.
    You could also use landscaping timbers also spiked together but they would most likely need to be set up in a stair step pattern to hold back that much dirt.There around 2.79 each usually.

    Not sure about the dirt or grass.
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Seems any retaining wall over 4 feet or so here in the freeze part of the world has some real problems, and needs good sound engineering. Nothing you want to throw together yourself. If it can be broken down into 3 or more steps of 3 - 3.5 feet each, then home ideas work.

    Seems to me wood goes bad in 10 - 20 years, the interlocking blocks or concrete lasts a lot longer. Whatever personal preference is wins - but wood seems more temporary.

    Me, I'd prefer a grass seeded slope, but I'm still not seeing why anything more is needed. :)

    --->Paul
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here if there is a long steep slope they usually lay the big chunks of limestone on it like was already suggested. These chunks are broken pieces about 6 to 10 inches in size. Here they call them rip-rap. They would need to be placed there by hand. I would scatter some grass seed over them when done.
    It would help if you could prevent water from running down the bank in large amounts.
     
  6. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have the same problem as you. Fortunately, my slope is direct south and perfect for a terraced garden area. Paul is correct on the short life span of anything wooden. It doesn't matter if it is preserved, like rr ties, you will be lucky to get 20 years. Walls of any material will require a lot of work, but heed the advice on keeping them fairly short. Otherwise, get an engineer. Old tires can work. If the erosion comes from water runoff, you will have to deal with that as you build your wall(s).
     
  7. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    railroad ties will work and prob. will be through your lifetime but remember when building a wall with them go down under grade 2 corses and always put dead men every 3 coarses dead men should be at least 6 foot and secured with a 5 foot rebar