Socket Systems

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by coalroadcabin, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    Has anybody used this type of system to construct a pole building?

    Socket System Link Here

    We will have our land paid for in June and plan to construct a garage/shop before we start to build the house. I found this system during a web search on pole buildings and it looks easy to use but I would like some feedback from someone who has experience building pole buildings. Thanks!!
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    I see design flaws in that system, mainly a triangle shape (as in standard trusses) does not flex; whereas the 4 surfaces with a floor can be flexed by high winds. If your in an area that has moderate winds, maybe the design will be enough but here in hurricane alley this would never fly;. or rather would fly often!
     

  3. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .............That is a very interesting website . One other thought I had.......You can build the same kind(s) of trusses out of steel Ibeams , have fewer of them and alot less labor involved and still end up with the same result . But , some folks just prefer their homes\barns to be built out of Wood . I would prefer to build the support and outer walls out of steel and the interior out of wood . Just depends on your personal preferences and budget . fordy.. :)
     
  4. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    that looks good to me i been thinking what kind of barn to build i see barns 50 years old in the section of ar. where we are going not built that good there still standing
     
  5. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    moopups,
    would collar ties help? I really like the idea of the ceiling height since my husband will eventually want to put a lift in the garage. This system also seems like it would be less expensive than buying pre-fab trusses (and I'm not real confident about fabbing our own-might waste quite a bit of $$ with the learning curve there)
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    If you will look at the picture at the upper right of the posted sites home page you will see the minium amount of collar ties and diagional gussets that I would be comfortable with, the drawing is better at displaying a final design over the photograph lower in the scrolling.

    The collar ties are normally placed 1/3rd down from the inside of the pitch crown to the ceiling joists, or where ceiling joist would be if employed.
     
  7. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    Might be a fair system to use.

    They are duplicating the idea of post / beam type construction and eliminating the need for highly engineering / formed-cut / close fitting joints that would be cut and utilized in those type structures.

    Your new typical stick built house probably has 3.5" as the longest nail in it. They offer a way of making fairly well secured joints with far larger members. At least you can figure your costs quite accurately. Might even be able to buy one of each type fitting and copy them to make your own. Don't look like very complex critters.

    They are using essentially a bent / bay type design for many structures. Using collar ties may / may not add anything to the structure. Many barns don't use them. If they were to be added, probably would have to be equally hefty, engineered to fit. Adding some flimsy stick isn't going to do much. The shapes / designs they appear to be using are pretty time tested.

    Don't know if this is as vulnerable to wind as some may think. They are offering a pretty solid method to tie it to the foundation and a reasonably good way to secure the roof. It is not the structure that normally fails in high winds. Normally the roof blows off and the building then is able to rack and twist around enough to be blown down. Or as in many cases it is simply blown off its foundation. How much it shakes normally is probably determined by what the internal components design is and how much stiffening they lend to the structure as well as the site characteristics. As well as the siding construction.

    Like with most good engineered structures you are using the minimun amount of materials for construction of a given volume. You could do a bit of cost analysis. The socket parts cost may well be saved by the avoided costs of additional materials in more conventional construction. Certainly is much faster than cutting normal post / beam joints which has become a bit of a speciality. Should be quick to build. Maybe fairly easy to get approved for construction, lot metal ties / hangers, gizmos, etc being used in frame construction today and the regulators seem to like them.