Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I have everything i need now....bought 2 muffin trays in the silicone stuff...and 2 medium size squares, a bit more expensive to a Kitty litter tray but oh well....have a heat resistent spoon, and thermometre. The only thing I dont have is a big bowl to mix it in....what do y'll use? I have a pottery one I can put my GM in to add the lye....but I dont think it is big enough when added to the oils. :shrug:
Cant wait...will let you all know how it goes. :clap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
726 Posts
I've mixed in dishpans, ceramic coated pots, stainless pots.

Just so we don't have any accidents...make sure you add your lye to your milk or water, and then your mixed lye solution to your oils. And your milk should be frozen solid if you are making 100% GM soap. dump the weighed lye over the weighed frozen milk cubes or chunks and mix until it is all melted. Then into the melted oils it goes!

Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Have you considered trying the Room Temperature Cold Process Method. (RTCP) that way you can buy pass using the thermometers and all that fuss and you can use plastic if you want. Since everything your using is room temperature including the liquid your lye is mixed into. I've become a big fan of that method since i started using it a year ago. One other benefit to the room temp method is that your work time is a bit longer than with regular CP soap.

And then you can use half your liquid as water and mix your lye in with that and later add in the goat's milk at trace. I don't have access to goat's milk so i use the concentrated canned goat's milk. That way when my soap is made up 100% of the liquid is considered goat's milk, but i keep the amounts separate until trace. By adding your liquid in at trace you don't need to fool with possibly burning your goat's milk or getting an orange soap from the sugars in the milk heating up before they should. Or deal with goats milk slush and all the variations on that.

another thought is what kind of silicone muffin pans did you pick up. If they are the cheaper red ones from wal-mart your soap will have a red tint to it. For the silicone molds you really want the wilton brand ones to avoid the color bleeding into your soap.

What about a stick blender that is very important......

One other thing that works great for mixing your lye and liquid together is a 2 quart pitcher the kind you use to make kool-aid in..... and yes it can later be used for kool-aid again once it's washed well with soap and water.

What is the size of your recipe, how many ounces of oils are you going to use. I also have taught many to make soap, and found that most start off with a recipe that is rather large. And should something happen, it can be a big pill to swallow. For a beginner a 1-2 pound recipe is a good place to start. But before that you need to fit your recipe to your mold. A great mold can even be a cardboard box, lol cut down to size, or even a plastic drawer organizer works great as well. But the best part is with a simple math problem you can tailor your recipe to fit your mold so you don't have excess soap being made. Then wonder what you will do with it fast.

Then your recipe is also another imporatant issue. Did you run your recipe through a lye calc to make sure it's correct and has safe amounts of liquid and lye. And also are the proportions of the oils correct. I found many soap recipes found on the net to be iffy if not a poor recipe they are out of balance when you look at the balance of the different oils being used.


just a thought,
sorry that it was a bit more information than you might be looking for.


edited to add also a digital scale is a necessity. Don't trust a recipe that is based on a cup of this and a tablespoon of that. You need actual weight measurements. And it's best to weigh in grams because you can be more accurate than with ounces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,221 Posts
Have you considered trying the Room Temperature Cold Process Method. (RTCP) that way you can buy pass using the thermometers and all that fuss and you can use plastic if you want. Since everything your using is room temperature including the liquid your lye is mixed into.
Not a good way to go when using Real Milk!

And then you can use half your liquid as water and mix your lye in with that and later add in the goat's milk at trace. I don't have access to goat's milk so i use the concentrated canned goat's milk. That way when my soap is made up 100% of the liquid is considered goat's milk, but i keep the amounts separate until trace. By adding your liquid in at trace you don't need to fool with possibly burning your goat's milk or getting an orange soap from the sugars in the milk heating up before they should. Or deal with goats milk slush and all the variations on that.
If you use a discounted lye solution, you can run into trouble using this method. water is 100% saturated with equal part of water/lye. Let's say you're making a recipe using 3# oil with 3% superfat and using a 32% lye solution. Amont of lye called for is 6.8 oz and the amount of liquid is 14.4

You are awfully close to a totally saturated lye solution using 6.8 oz of water to 7.2 oz of of water. When you pour your lye solution into your oils, you better be moving fast to pour in the milk because it will be emulsifying fast!

The other thing you will want to watch for using RTCP with milk is the main purpose of the liquid in the lye solution is to efficiently distribute the lye to the oils. Insufficient liquid can cause you problems!



For a beginner a 1-2 pound recipe is a good place to start.
Just a matter of opinion, but I recommed a recipe using 3 pounds of oil. It's small enough not to take a financial hit if you mess it up, but large enough to give you some shimmey room in case your scale isn't all that accurate.

If folks want to use a recipe using 1-2 pounds of oils, I suggest they convert the recipe to grams for better accuracy.

I found many soap recipes found on the net to be iffy if not a poor recipe they are out of balance when you look at the balance of the different oils being used.
Boy-o, that's the truth! Always, Always Always double check the soap recipe you are going to use against a reputable lye calculator!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Cyndi, why is it so difficult to make milk soap? I know you people that have the goats say it's easy but, it really is special to get it to smell right. what is your secret before i attempt this again because I stopped making milk because it just did not smell right. I did the ice, I did the frozen milk, I did the powdered milk, i did what else? I want milk soap. I love my soap but man, milks is the bomb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,221 Posts
It's no secret -

I have my oils ready first, the use frozen milk that the lye is dumped into (about 1/3 of the lye, stir well, then half of what lye is left, stir well, then the rest, stir well - blend with stick blender to break up the rest of the frozen milk) Pour immediately into waiting oils. Bring to trace, pour into molds, insulate well (I wrap mold in 2 wool blankets and set on top of running clothes dryer). Unmold about 24 hours later

There will always be an ammonia smell during saponification and immediately after unmolding, but it does go away.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,440 Posts
Cyndi, why is it so difficult to make milk soap? I know you people that have the goats say it's easy but, it really is special to get it to smell right. what is your secret before i attempt this again because I stopped making milk because it just did not smell right. I did the ice, I did the frozen milk, I did the powdered milk, i did what else? I want milk soap. I love my soap but man, milks is the bomb.
If you use cream or evaporated milk as half the liquid, you can dissolve your lye in the water and add the cream or evap. milk at trace. I have never scorched my milk this way. It is the easiest way I know to get milk into the soap without burning it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thankyou everyone for your input....sure am glad I started this thread. Needless to say with Christmas and New Years tonight I havent made soap yet....my hubby wont let me make it without him here....once he sees the process and how safe it is he will relax. :)
We dont have Walmart in Oz.... so my silicone trays are bright pink, being my favorite color and all. :) I will keep you posted on my progress. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
If you use cream or evaporated milk as half the liquid, you can dissolve your lye in the water and add the cream or evap. milk at trace. I have never scorched my milk this way. It is the easiest way I know to get milk into the soap without burning it.
okay, since I'm impatient mama and I love to make soap, I'm going to try evaporated milk today. I don't want to wait for the milk to freeze. When my manfriend gets here, I'll go to the store and get som. I really love the buttermilk soaps though, I thougth they were were creamier, if there is such a word. have you used the buttermilk this way also? I think once i find a milk way, that I like, I may go back to it. But I just love scents and I found with the milk soaps, even my Lavender didn't smell as good as my regular veggie soaps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,221 Posts
Buttermilk .... I wouldn't say that Real buttermilk is creamier. What is left after you make butter from cream is a thin whey. All the fat in the cream is used in the butter. The whey is full of protein that makes a silkier soap, but they are not 'creamier'.

The buttermilk you will buy in the store is actually milk (whole, 2%, 1%) that has had a culture added to it for flavor. Not the same as Real buttermilk (what is left over after making butter)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
I liked the powdered but again, didn't work all the way right. I may go back to it. It was even good for just having around the house.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
761 Posts
Always, Always Always double check the soap recipe you are going to use against a reputable lye calculator!!
I am NOT a stupid woman.........but I have a VERY hard time "reading" the calculators. Heck, I even have a difficult time just figuring out where to plug in the amounts on some of them, much less being able to read them!! Is there one out there that is easy to read for us beginners? Now I have made soap before (even outside in an iron kettle with lye, water and lard.....just pour it in and stir till thick), but I always had __ pounds of water, __ of lye, __ pounds of lard for a recipe. I have a general idea of whats going on, and have even read, and own lots of books on the subject. But all of this chemical stuff is above my head :shrug: Is there a website, or book, that some of you can recommend that is a simplier read than many of the websites (and even many of the posts here are way too technicial).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Steph, I understand what you mean. sometimes the chemical make up that people talk is a bit much. Just throw it out. I work on percentages. I had an excel one but now use the soapmaker. It really is easy. If you decide you want 20% of something. you just keep putting in numbers until it gets to 20%. it is very easy very good. and it's your's and it's not expensive. go here, I think they have pictures of it. you can down load it for trial also, I think. yes, here it is. http://www.soapmaker.ca/ the trial is on the right hand side. If you have questions today, I'm off and I can help you play with it. Trust me, it's good. If you want an online one that may also be easy, try Majestic Mountain Sage. http://www.thesage.com/calcs/lyecalc2.php I've used this also. I'll help you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
761 Posts
tytbody, Thanks for the calculator at thesage.......This is simple and usable!!!!!! And looks like alot of nice recipes also. I hope to get "into" making some different soaps. I only do the old time lye soap right now. Lye, water, lard. But , I'd like to play around with some of the "smelly" ones!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
as long as lye, water lard work and you have good percentages, no problem. do you mean you want to buy some fragrance oils to add to your base soap recipe?
sometimes too many oils is not necessary. I think I tried a lot and then I'm still down to my basic, veggie soap. lol. did borage, almond, apricot, heem, emu, and more and for what. I don't even use them. too expensive. lol. feel free to email me any time. I'm always on my puter. Love it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Have you considered trying the Room Temperature Cold Process Method. (RTCP) that way you can buy pass using the thermometers and all that fuss and you can use plastic if you want. Since everything your using is room temperature including the liquid your lye is mixed into. I've become a big fan of that method since i started using it a year ago. One other benefit to the room temp method is that your work time is a bit longer than with regular CP soap.

And then you can use half your liquid as water and mix your lye in with that and later add in the goat's milk at trace. I don't have access to goat's milk so i use the concentrated canned goat's milk. That way when my soap is made up 100% of the liquid is considered goat's milk, but i keep the amounts separate until trace. By adding your liquid in at trace you don't need to fool with possibly burning your goat's milk or getting an orange soap from the sugars in the milk heating up before they should. Or deal with goats milk slush and all the variations on that.

another thought is what kind of silicone muffin pans did you pick up. If they are the cheaper red ones from wal-mart your soap will have a red tint to it. For the silicone molds you really want the wilton brand ones to avoid the color bleeding into your soap.

What about a stick blender that is very important......

One other thing that works great for mixing your lye and liquid together is a 2 quart pitcher the kind you use to make kool-aid in..... and yes it can later be used for kool-aid again once it's washed well with soap and water.

What is the size of your recipe, how many ounces of oils are you going to use. I also have taught many to make soap, and found that most start off with a recipe that is rather large. And should something happen, it can be a big pill to swallow. For a beginner a 1-2 pound recipe is a good place to start. But before that you need to fit your recipe to your mold. A great mold can even be a cardboard box, lol cut down to size, or even a plastic drawer organizer works great as well. But the best part is with a simple math problem you can tailor your recipe to fit your mold so you don't have excess soap being made. Then wonder what you will do with it fast.

Then your recipe is also another imporatant issue. Did you run your recipe through a lye calc to make sure it's correct and has safe amounts of liquid and lye. And also are the proportions of the oils correct. I found many soap recipes found on the net to be iffy if not a poor recipe they are out of balance when you look at the balance of the different oils being used.


just a thought,
sorry that it was a bit more information than you might be looking for.


edited to add also a digital scale is a necessity. Don't trust a recipe that is based on a cup of this and a tablespoon of that. You need actual weight measurements. And it's best to weigh in grams because you can be more accurate than with ounces.
I actually didnt measure the temp of anything during my first soap batch....should I have? It still traced and looks like it is doing what its supposed to do. We are having such horrible hot weather I am wondering if it will cure....any thoughts on keeping it cool so curing can occur....its more like melting at the moment. Your advice is much appreciated. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Shazz, did you read a recipe before you attempted making soap? did you read about temps, utensils, what to look for, etc ? sounds like you are missing quite a lot and I say go back and start over. you can rebatch but if you didn't do a regular batch right I doubt rebatching will help at this point. but some will say that. I say just start over. Who cares how much oils you lost. You are learning. i will cure, but just take a bit longer.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top