soaking corn to feed to piggies

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by vancom, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    I looked at various posts and I have seen info re soaking corn in unpasturized milk (since it will ferment) and have a questions or two. The bag I bought is NOT cracked corn but whole kernel. How long do I soak it before I feed some? Any particular proportion of corn to milk?

    So far I have been feeding 1 quart milk, two eggs, assorted leftovers (maybe 1-2 cups) and then 4 cups starter/grower feed twice a day to my 2 pigs. Occasionally I also feed some Chaffe Hay (alfalfa that is fermented, for my dairy goats) and regular alfalfa as extras. I can never tell if it's enough. When they were smaller it took 10-15 minutes for then to finish; several months later it's gone really fast and I have been increasing slowly but still not sure if it is enough.

    Any ideas re adding corn? I know to do it slowly but I need some help in getting it ready for them.. Thanks!

    Vanessa
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I've never soaked corn in milk, but have fed several hogs out in the past by soaking it in water. I took a barrel full of corn and filled it with water. Make sure the water comes several inches above the, because the corn will swell and absorb the liquid. Cover it for 5-7 days, and start feeding it. The hogs love it. You do need some supplements to bring the protein up. I don't do it anymore, because now I use a grinder and mix my own feed. Sorry I can't be more help on the milk, but I don't have any experience with that.
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We used to soak corn with Water, let it soak for 4-7 days then grind it ,That way they will get more feed value. out of it. Mix the milk and extras after it has soaked.
     
  4. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    thanks--grind it in what? I am woefully unprepared to grind anything but coffee beans--I am a transplanted yuppie living in rural america--I love it (laying hens, milking goats, I know from these things--pigs, not so much!) but nevertheless I wonder sometimes---what kind of grinder? Can I make do somehow without it??

    I can handle soaking--

    Thanks!

    Vanessa
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    If they are not skinny, then they are okay with what you are feeding. You should be seeing little but well- formed hams and shoulders by now, hardly any ribs. I can't compare with my feeding since they forage all day. I only feed about 6 pounds of whole corn in a quart of milk -not soaked- twice a day to all three (sow and 2 gilts). Maybe Greg can help? :)
     
  6. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    The soaking will work fine if you don't want to bother with a grinder. Lehman's hardware has the mill that I use. If you want to see it go to www.lehmans.com, click on Kitchen, then Helps and Accessories, then Grain and Grain Mills. The one I use is called the High Speed Flour Mill, item #2360. I put a motor on it, and I can grind 300 pounds of corn in about an hour.
     
  7. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    Soaking in water for 12 hrs seems to work fine for me. Anything less than that I see undigested remnants after feeding.
     
  8. Gideon's War

    Gideon's War Well-Known Member

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    How big a motor did you put on that?
     
  9. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I put a 1 hp, farm duty motor from Northern Tool on it. If I ever have to replace this one I'm probably going to up it to 1 1/2 hp. The 1 hp seems to run a little on the warm side to me. It grinds fine, and has never tripped the thermal overload, but I don't think the 1 1/2 would have to work as hard. I also have the mill turning about 218 rpm, but I'm going to change the sheave on the motor and up it to about 400, and see how the motor does with that. That should reduce my grinding time, if the motor can handle it okay.
     
  10. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Just for general information, I just put the bigger sheave on the motor and increased my mill speed to 436 rpm. I can now grind 300 lbs in 35 minutes, and the motor is actually running cooler.
     
  11. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If these are feeders, I'd give them all they can eat.
     
  12. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    We do not feed dried corn. We feed whole oats and whole wheat fermented in raw goat milk. Pigs do receive FRESH corn on the cob and corn stalks but not dried corn.
     
  13. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    We've been soaking the dried corn in water over night and the boys get a handful each meal, along with grower ration, some of the finer alfalfa, some assorted table scraps, a couple of eggs and some goat milk when the family lets me! They are looooking good.

    We have no fresh corn--this has been a trying summer here in Middle TN--HOT and little rain. The cukes are struggling, no zuchinni and the cherry tomatoes are the only things that have done well. Corn I didn't even try, and everyone's looks awful.

    We will measure the piggies this weekend with a tape measure--found a formula on the internet that purports to tell me how much they weigh based on the girth, etc. I have a tape measure for the goats but the piggies are an unknown. I'll bet 100 pounds plus at this point...maybe 125-ish.

    Vanessa