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Discussion Starter #2
Not sure what happened to the rest of the text, but we dont have a tractor so any suggestions welcome!
 

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I assume you are talking of that hill side. Continue to clean up that brush via mowing, or herbicide. Get a soil test done and report back as to deficiencies. Many grasses will not even germinate at lower ph levels. Also, how well does it drain? What type of soil do you have? I would be reluctant to put a heavy disc or plow to that hillside due to erosion, so I'd continue to mow and figure out what grasses or legumes will grow on that hill side first. Then no till it in... No tractor is going to be an issue there.

If you get it mowed you might be surprised as to what pops up...
 

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I agree with beets, first and foremost get some ground cover going to hold the soil in place and prevent erosion. If possible windrow the brush from side to side on the hill, which will help erosion also. I would not burn the brush, but windrow it in this fashion maybe a few rows before you gt to the bottom, leaving enough room in-between each to make a few passes with tractor and bush hog. This time of year I would probably be looking and sewing generous amounts of winter wheat or maybe a annual ryegrass. beets is correct without proper soil you may not have the best yields, but if you can get something started that is the important part. I think it is best to get even a poor stand of grass started now rather than wait a year to get everything just right and some new equipment to do anything. By then you will need a good front end loader so you can scoop up all of your dirt at the bottom of the hill and carry it back up on the hillside.

My suggestion for now. Visit your local co-op, ask what everyone is planting or what is recommended for this time of year where you liver and spend a little $$ on seed, and a hand seeder for that small area. get seed on the ground. You may not get a real good stand, but it may be enough to hold things in place through this winter. that will buy you some time to get the proper soil test and really make a long term plan for permanent pasture. Then spend this winter with a chainsaw and windrow the brush as I described earlier. You do not want to get to spring and let all that trash be left strowed around, you will tear uo a good tractor trying to bushhog over unknown trash strwoed around and the brambles will grow up and you will just have a mess, that you can not do anything with until next winter when all the brush finally dies and you can see to do something again.

That is my suggestion anyway. On that small area and it being on a hillside a good chainsaw and a helper will do more good than a tractor at this point in my opinion.

BTW, it is a nice looking place, keep us updated with your progress, I wish you the best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies it's about eight acres we are having done. Here is a pic about midway up. ImageUploadedByHomesteading Today1416879912.623731.jpg .
 

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what type of animals do you have? a soil analysis would be a good start
 

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I would plant pasture grasses and clover. Getting pretty late but I would put rye on too. Does annual ryegrass grow there? Real late but the more cover the better. Then you can work on cleaning up. Walking and dragging brush will help settle the seed. Anything that will make wood can be cut and left to pick up later. In the spring put a few animals in to keep it eaten down, a few goats would be good. If you have sheep they could be put on earlier without damage that cattle would do. Just keep cleaning it up....James
 

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I would plant pasture grasses and clover. Getting pretty late but I would put rye on too. Does annual ryegrass grow there? Real late but the more cover the better. Then you can work on cleaning up. Walking and dragging brush will help settle the seed. Anything that will make wood can be cut and left to pick up later. In the spring put a few animals in to keep it eaten down, a few goats would be good. If you have sheep they could be put on earlier without damage that cattle would do. Just keep cleaning it up....James

Ohio is home and we have sheep hopefully the loggers will finish up this week so I can start the journey! So start seeding sooner than later before clearing of brush and sticks??
 

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Putting down some kind of seed to help hold the bare soil in place would be my first priority. the day they leave, I would be coming behind them spreading seed.
 

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Thank you everyone for the replies, knowledge shared is knowledge learned I can pass to my kids! Have a good holiday season.
 

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Inoculate your legume seeds. Helps them set nitrogen. A little of a lot of different varieties and see what does well, gives a good mix. Even if some may not continue, what does grow, will set nitrogen. Here on hill sides we like a little subterranian(sp) clover. It sets seed close to the ground so it always sets seed, has an extensive root system to hold soil, always comes back after drought and is excellent feed. Tough to mow if real thick, it grows on the ground and a single plant can spread 5' or more. Livestock will get fat on it even when dried up, we used it to flush sheep for breeding. Another was lotus, especially on poor soil and wetter ground. Vetch is another. Vetch was used by the soil bank here to improve soil left fallow for years. Like sub clover the seeds can set for many many years and a little scratching or heavy livestock trampling and a good rain shower and here it comes....James
 
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