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There is a great sale at Lowes right now on a snow blower. It is rated for 50' driveways with snow up to 12" deep. I noticed that there are some snow blowers for sale that are rated for up to 16" snow for a couple hundred dollars more. Do you think there is any reason to jump up to 16" over 12"? I am in the market for my first ever snow blower because we have two driveways which are far too long to shovel by hand and I don't want to pay a plow guy anymore :)
 

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Well I have never seen a snowblower advertised for some amount of snowfall. I know when I went shopping of one many years ago I Wanted to get a 8 hp one. They did not have 8 hp ones only 10hp. so I got the 10hp gas horsey. LOL
And I never regretted it. When it comes to snowplowing I sure would go with one that can blow up to 16 inch snowfall which I Take it Means the Height Of the Blower Housing?
Like I say I have never seen one advertised that way. HP and how Wide the housing is mine is a 24 Inches wide. And as far as blowing a certain depth well it is a 24inch snowfall you just blow at a slower rate of speed. LOL
But IMO the larger one, even if a few dollars more, you will be surprised how many times you will be glad you did in the coming years. LOL

Are you talking about a Gas powered one? A Electric one ( Corded?) Or a Cordless single stage,, Those look like they are advertised so deep a snow fall etc.
 

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There are so many variables involved. How much snow do you get? Do you get heavy wet snow or light fluffy snow? Does the snow plow throw up a ridge across the end of your driveway? What's your budget?

I owned a corner lot in St. Paul for 22 years. We had lots of snow and heavy wet stuff in the spring. The snow plow sealed the end of the driveway just after you finished blowing the snow (I think they did it on purpose). I made out with a $300 single stage MTD but went through 4 of them.

The answer is buy very good quality and the biggest you can afford. Many brands have gone under and the name has been purchased by MTD. They make Bolens, MTD, Cub Cadet, Troy Built, and Yard Man. I don't think they are very good quality. Lowes handles Troy Built, Bolens, and Husquavarna. I have a Husky chain saw and it's been very good quality so I think their snow blower would also be good. I have sold Toro and they are well built too.

http://www.mtdproducts.com/equipment/company_10500_20500_-1


Snow blowers come in single stage and two stage. Single stage are good for a normal snowfall. They will plug up with heavy wet snow. They won't handle the ridge a snow plow puts across the end of your driveway. Two stage do handle heavy wet snow and the ridge from the plow.

I recommend electric start with a pull start back up. You will save a lot of work if you start a cold engine using the electric start, especially if the engine starts hard in the cold weather. If the snow blower kills while you are using it, you want to be able to start the warm engine with the rope instead of wheeling it back to the outlet.

Self propelled means less work for you.

I have a 1963 Simplicity 2 stage that I use on the homestead. It's built to last and I can fix it myself.

Good Luck.
 

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If Lowes sells it tis because no servicing dealer ever would. Please look into getting one from someone who can maintain it. An investment like this should last a lifetime. Big box stores specialize in "Sales" rather than providing a quality product with quality support. Even if they do sometimes have a good product on sale, often dealers will match the price and take care of it for many years to come.
 

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Since I moved down south, I don't do snow anymore we got a hard freeze last year and that's about it for the last couple of years. When I was in Minnesota and Wisconsin it was another story. A 2 stage snow blower is for me a must, you are in new hampshire so must likely see a good deal of snow yearly. Electric start is a must too, beats rope starting it in the cold. I only purchase one in my life, it was a used one form the local small engine repair shop. older heavy duty model, all fixed up and easily serviced by the shop who sod it to me. Don't disregard those for a newer lighter model.
 

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You bet and am I ever glad mine has a electric start. Pull Starting a COLD cold 10hp is just not fun at all.~ I have tried and failed, now when warmed up and it stops some distance from a electrical outlet, the pull start works good. But not when it is a cold start up.
 

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I've never heard of a snow blower rated that way.

Here in Minnesnowda you want an 8 hp 2 stage about 28 inches wide. Or bigger. Probably 2 foot high openning? You can angle up a bit to get the deeper snow and work about 3 feet through in the bigger drifts.

Plug in electric start is very very very nice.....

The 5 hp units can't blow the snow out of their own way....

The single stage units are a joke, I'd rather use a shovel.

If your snow melts away between snowfalls, then perhaps you can back down from this.

Here, the snow comes and stays all winter, adding more and more and more - you need to be able to blow the snow up and over the previous 8 snowfalls you blew away previously.....

Paul
 

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After years of shoveling, I finally had it three years years ago and got a blower.

I ended up buying the 26" 208 cc Troy-Bilt from Lowes. It's been fantastic so far.

I talked to a bunch of people who own blowers and the consensus was to get a bigger one than you think you need. When we got ours, I thought I could have gotten a smaller one and saved a hundred bucks. It is overkill when there's just a few inches of snow, and I felt kind of ridiculous. But then, when we get a blizzard with two feet of powder or a pile of wet snow you understand the importance of the power.
 

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Don't forget to buy the optional snow shield if it is available. I've been kicking myself for thirty years that I didn't spend the 80 bucks at the time. Every time the wind blows from the west and I am blowing to the west. Brrrrrr. I bought an 8HP electric start Simplicity two stage self-propelled, in 1981, and it's still going strong. Just put new belts on, changed the oil, new spark plug, lubed, and adjusted the electric start bolts, and it's good to go. Oh, don't forget wheel chains, too.

geo
 

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The one I am currently looking at is this one:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_189194-270-...les_dollar|1&facetInfo=Troy-Bilt|Troy-Bilt XP

Apparently they don't rate them by HP anymore, so it is hard for me to know where this one stands in the scheme of things.
something like for every 30cc is 1hp. so that is close enough to be considered a 6hp one. Not bad, but imo just a tad under powered.
I have a 24inch 2 stage like that one, only a 10hp sits on it. But a good price.
Now in your area you have to ask yourself how many large snowfalls are expected, and how many are some large ones 15 inches to a 24 inch snowfall at one time.
If you get lots of 3 to 6 inch falls, that would great. But some of those 12 to 18 inch ones or more of heavy wet stuff, that is like I say IMO is a little underpowered.
 

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Ask Lowes about servicing. Then follow up by contacting the service department. Around here, most of the big box stores do minor repairs in-house, but send all major work out. This means a long response time. Mst of the local mechanics around here won't work on machines that you buy at big box stores. When I asked the mechanic that I use why, he said the machines are generally cheaper than the ones he sells, and they're harder to fix. I guess the big box stores sell by price more than quality (and probably because that's what most people look at).

If you live in NH, I expect that you get a lot of snow. Get as big a machine that you can afford. A bigger engine will last longer, and a bigger opening will move more snow. I had a 33 inch, 12 HP one for a few years, and loved it. I think it was a Yardbird from Canada. 6 forward speeds, 2 reverse, with a light. The faster speeds were great for just moving back across the drive to store it (after the snow was cleared). The slower speeds were for (obviously) moving snow, and the slowest speed was for really deep stuff. The light was great for clearing snow after I got home from work; especially when I had to get up the next day to go back. I had a plow for my tractor, and in my opinion, the snow blower beat it hands down. I only got rid of it because I bought a skid loader.

Blowers also have heated grips now. It may sound goofy, but I'd get them if I had a choice.

I agree with the folks that suggest Husquvarna, Troybilts, etc. and electric start. Mine had eletric start, with the option for a pull start if the battery dies. Storing it somewhere that's heated will help too, especially when you know a storm is coming. Good luck! Curt
 

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I bought a Yardworks from Canadian Tire many years ago when I moved out of Toronto, 10hp, 30" wide, electric start, 6 spd fwd, 2 spd back, it was great, moved any snow I drove it into, at times it was higher than the mouth of the machine but it just chewed it's way through. A couple of years later it was stolen out of my driveway so for the next few years I made do with a couple of much smaller used ones as our winters weren't that bad for a while. then last year we got dumped on and the smaller blower just wasn't cutting it so I went back to Canadian Tire and bought the current model of the big blower I had before.

Lesson learned: Get the biggest, baddest one you can afford. During light snow storms you can use a higher gear and your job will be done very quickly. However, when you get a major storm you will be extremely happy you have the bigger machine. All it takes is one major snow fall that you can't clean up properly and your driveway will be difficult to manage for the rest of the year.

Looking back, I think I only needed to use the machine to clear the driveway three or four times during a light winter. Last winter I think I used it about eight or nine times and it was one of the heaviest snowfalls we have had here in many years. It doesn't get used nearly as much as the lawn mower so your investment should last many years and you'll be glad you got the big machine.
 

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I agree with the folks that suggest Husquvarna, Troybilts, etc. and electric start. Mine had eletric start, with the option for a pull start if the battery dies. Storing it somewhere that's heated will help too, especially when you know a storm is coming. Good luck! Curt
Some, like mine, do not have a battery start. They have a 110v starter~~, no need to worry about a low battery that is for sure. Love It~! Just plug in the cord, and push the button. LOL. It does have a pull start if you are away from an outlet. But in the last 15 years I have only had to do that once. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I went and looked at the one that is on sale. It seems kind of short and small. I have concerns about it doing what it needs to do here at my house. A little bit more info:

We have a top driveway that is around 3 cars long and 2 cars wide.

We also have a bottom driveway that is around 2 cars wide and 8-10 cars long.

We also plan to use it to blow a path to our livestock throughout the winter.

After visiting Lowes, I am considering buying this one:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_594161-6331...f52-bf9b-4ca8-0b12-000073dadedc&kpid=50223005
 

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I went and looked at the one that is on sale. It seems kind of short and small. I have concerns about it doing what it needs to do here at my house. A little bit more info:

We have a top driveway that is around 3 cars long and 2 cars wide.

We also have a bottom driveway that is around 2 cars wide and 8-10 cars long.

We also plan to use it to blow a path to our livestock throughout the winter.

After visiting Lowes, I am considering buying this one:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_594161-6331...f52-bf9b-4ca8-0b12-000073dadedc&kpid=50223005
Looks like a thing of beauty! You might want to consider chains for the wheels for extra traction. Curt
 

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I went and looked at the one that is on sale. It seems kind of short and small. I have concerns about it doing what it needs to do here at my house. A little bit more info:

We have a top driveway that is around 3 cars long and 2 cars wide.

We also have a bottom driveway that is around 2 cars wide and 8-10 cars long.

We also plan to use it to blow a path to our livestock throughout the winter.

After visiting Lowes, I am considering buying this one:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_594161-6331...f52-bf9b-4ca8-0b12-000073dadedc&kpid=50223005
Yes if you have that much blowing I sure would be looking at the larger HP ones.
You can never have too much Horse Power when it comes to blowing snow, but you sure can have a underpowered one.
 
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