Snake ID?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Peacock, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    DH and I found this little guy out by the woodpile. SW Ohio near Dayton...any ideas?

    Particularly...poisonous or not??! :help:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. ajharris

    ajharris Amanda

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    Looks like a chicken snake.
     

  3. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    also known as a rat snake. Good rodent protection for you. Protect your chicks and eggs from them. Not venomous at all.
     
  4. busybee870

    busybee870 Well-Known Member

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    if it was at my house it would be a "soon to be dead snake"
     
  5. busybee870

    busybee870 Well-Known Member

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    i KNOW i SHOULD PROBABLY STUDY ON SNAKES SO I DONT KILL THE ONES THAT BENEFIT THE PLACE, IM JUST SO DARN SCARED OF ALL OF THEM
     
  6. Ozarkguy

    Ozarkguy Well-Known Member

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    That's Bob. Please let him go!




    :) (wink) Ozarkguy









    .
     
  7. Fla Gal

    Fla Gal Bunny Poo Monger Supporter

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    Ozarkguy, are you sure that isn't Ralph or their sister Billie Jo???

    Busybee, no need to be so afraid of them all. Get yourself a book out of the library, or even do an internet search for information on all the snakes in your area and learn to identify them.

    As much as I like snakes I don't like getting suprised either but, having the good guys around is very beneficial, and they're fun to play with too, untill they start eating your chicks or eggs.
     
  8. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    Thanks, all! It's hard to tell sometimes from pictures on the Internet. DH thought it was a rattlesnake! It didn't have a rattle, but we figured maybe as a baby snake it might not. I still thought it'd at least have a "button" but hey, I'm no herp expert. He swears he saw a rattlesnake a couple months ago by the wood pile. Google research told me that timber rattlers don't live here - not far, a little to the east, but not here. Of course you never know. But he swears he heard a rattle. I understand that many snakes make a rattling sound with their tails when they get defensive, even if they don't have actual rattles. That's probably what he heard.

    And then our dog got bit on the nose by a garter snake. Harmless, but if the big dummy will let one of those bite him, what if it really was a rattler?

    Anyhow, I Googled some more after you answered me, and came to the conclusion that the snake was indeed a juvenile black rat snake. He's now free without bail. ;)
     
  9. Ozarkguy

    Ozarkguy Well-Known Member

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    "...Ralph or their sister Billie Jo???" :) :) :)


    "He's now free without bail." Oh goody. Just like the Free Willy story! :dance:



    Now..... :rolleyes: ...I really don't know what he, she, it, is. But I have a lot of copperheads around me. Ickybad poisonous. But unless they are directly in my walk area to the lake or hanging close to the buildings, I just ignore them.

    Hiding out in my wood pile, they're a gonner! But if I see one down by the lake or something, I just leave them alone. I figure they keep the rodent population in check and provide a meal for a coon or hawk instead of someone's chickens! :p


    gotta love those hills.....

    Ozarkguy









    .
     
  10. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    Well, I knew he wasn't a copperhead. I was leaning toward Eastern Massauga Rattlesnake --
    [​IMG]
    But I don't think they're native to my area either. Again, found not too far away, but far enough. And no rattle.
     
  11. ToraAnne

    ToraAnne Well-Known Member

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    My dad and I used to travel around doing Snake Safety shows....

    I have no idea what the snake is....but I do have this info--if anyone wants it.

    All snakes bite, all snakes have teeth. All snakes eat the same nasty things (mice, rats, frogs, toads, birds, fish etc....) You can possibly get an infection from a non-poisonious snake and loose something like a finger to the infection.

    Snakes strike at heat and movement. When you see a snake, freeze do not move. If you must move--move very very very very slowly. Did I mention very??

    The only certain way to tell poisionious from non is by their pupils. Non have round pupils, poisionious have eliptical pupils (they go up and down) but by that time--you will probably already know. Many non look very much like those that are poisionous.

    Rattlesnakes do not always rattle before they strike. Some actually are born without rattles. Also, rattles do not tell the age etc... rattles break off easily and regrow. (a new rattle each time they shed, up to four times a year)



    For what it's worth--the snake is pretty, as far as snakes go!
     
  12. caryatid

    caryatid Well-Known Member

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    :rotfl:

    We do that at our house! If we *know* something is not dangerous, we name it. My kids used to freak out at spiders (when you are 3, EVERYTHING is a black widow). We have Arnold the arachnid (for the common house spiders that eat so many flies), Billy the bull snake, Gertrude the garden snake, Wilma the wolfie...... That way I don't have to say the word "spider" or "snake" which will instantly freak out my younger two.
     
  13. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    The snake is non-toxic. You can tell by the shape of it's head.

    In the US there are only two categories of snake that you have to worry about--pit vipers and coral snakes.

    There are no coral snakes in your region. The head shape of coral snakes is similar to that of non-toxic snakes. Coral snakes are found only along the southern edges of the US, from Florida to the California border. Coral snakes have round pupils. They have bands of red, yellow, and black. Several harmless snakes also have bands in these colors, but in a different order. A rhyme helps remember which is which: Red and yellow, kill a fellow. Red and black, venom lack.

    Pit vipers include rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, and water moccasins. They all have wedge-shaped heads with an exaggerated break between the back of the head and the neck. The shape is caused by the large venom glands. Pit vipers also have pits below and ahead of their eyes, which can make them appear to be four-eyed, but which 'see' in the heat spectrum instead of the visible spectrum. This is the group with vertical slit pupils--'cat eyes'. I cannot offhand remember if all of this group have keeled scales or not, but most of them do.

    There are a few non-toxic snakes with wedge-heads, keeled scales, and/or rattlesnake-like behaviors as an adaptation to look like they are more dangerous than they are. Hognosed snakes are one example of having wide heads and keeled scales. There are also many snakes that will 'rattle' by shaking their rattle-less tail in the grass, to imitate a rattlesnake--gopher snakes are an example of this trait.

    this site has a map of coral snake distribution: http://www.backyardnature.net/snakvenm.htm

    This picture of a copperhead illustrates the common pit-viper traits--slitlike pupils, keeled scales (a raised stripe in the middle of each scale), a wedge-shaped head, and pits in front of and slightly below the eyes.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Reptyle

    Reptyle Well-Known Member

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    Good post...Shoulda made one similar myself, but I kept forgetting about this thread...I'm of the opinion that the moccasin is the reason most harmless snakes are killed...Most people can identify a coral snake or copperhead and especially a rattler, but I think it is the fear of the moccasin and the fact that most can't identify them that makes them kill first and ask questions later.
     
  15. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Here is an image of a water moccassin which also shows the main pit viper traits.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    and here is a picture of a harmless hognose snake--notice how the keeled scales make it look like the pit vipers?

    [​IMG]
     
  17. tinda

    tinda Well-Known Member

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    I am so GLAD we only have little green garter snakes!

    Nothing else. :happy: :bouncy:

    tinda
     
  18. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    haveing a mom that did grow up in the rattlers range, we were taught to treat every snake as a poisonous snake ,leave them alone! after 46 years never been bit nor has any of my moms very large family (they have lived on the shores of lake huron for many decades!) just cause a snake is not native does not mean your not looking at a cobra! :help: people have been known too move snakes throughout the world! :flame: :grump: and a rattler hoping on a hold of hay could end up anywhere!
     
  19. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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  20. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    We found a baby ring-necked snake in the yard a few years ago, and named him Bob. Short for "Ring-a-ma-Bob" :)