Smokehouse

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by opus, Oct 1, 2004.

  1. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Just finished one today http://milneweb.com . Havent added any intake/exhaust to it yet. Did get a fire in it to try and dry the wood.

    Any suggestions? First one I have built. Thinking I need to make it as airtight as possible by sealing up cracks.

    Kinda figured we will use it on the even days as an outhouse, then on odd days a smokehouse. *;o)

    Got a bunch of birds to do in about a month, then elk season happens.
     
  2. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Looks like one of my neighbors except his is metal.

    big rockpile
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Opus; Does it have a pit under it? You coud have the fire down in the pit, if you didn't use it for an outhouse too often, Now and then probably wouldn't put the fire out, but your smoked meat would be one of a kind.
     
  4. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    No, I didnt put a pit under it, it is sitting on gravel. Think I should have a pit instead??

    I shall be known all over for my special smoked meat!
     
  5. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you occasionally use it as an outhouse, be careful not to smoke the wrong meat.
     
  6. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Looks like a dandy smoke house and cheap to boot.

    I wouldn't worry too much about making it airtight if you just want to cold smoke your meat. Mine is nothing more than an old shed. Everyone in the neighborhood knows when the smoker is going because they all stop to put out my shed, thinking it is on fire!

    My smoker unit is a 30 gallon metal barrel, where I build a small fire, toss in some birch and clap the lid on it. The lid is just a piece of sheet metal with a hole in it to let the smoke out.
     
  7. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bare, Your setup sounds like old fashioned homesteading at it's best.
     
  8. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    I just spent the day doing a test run. Best smoke comes from about 100 degrees. Not hot smoking, not cold smoking. Lets call it 'temperate smoking'.

    Pro's/con's on hot or cold smoking?

    If you didnt know, I have the smokehouse next to the chicken house. I am 'pre-smoking' the chickens. *;o)
     
  9. quietstar

    quietstar Well-Known Member

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    Angus Guy: You do good work with bricks and your design is unusual but looks solid as a brick....smoke house. The iron doors look like they would work in a clay/brick oven. Will you share the source and cost?....Thanks Glen
     
  10. angus_guy

    angus_guy Well-Known Member

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    Glen

    This was a B-Day Present from my kids (the note said SOME assembly required)

    but here is my cost in US Dollars

    Bricks faceade $325

    Bricks Fire $105

    Mortar (Type S) $56

    Metal from scrap yard $46

    metal from store $14

    Grates from Lowes (3) $39

    sand $45

    pavers $70

    Fire Clay $10.00

    Roll of Wire for Mig welder $28.00

    Labor from Sheet Metal Shop $40.00

    Hinges (6) $15.00

    Chipping hammers (for handles) 3 $6.00

    Trowel (pro series) 13.00 (My wife said it "looked like a pro did it" )

    two bi-metal thermometers $32

    Total $844

    The design is from several sources "on that dang ole internet"
    but the concept is to use thermal mass to retain the heat

    The left side is to make coals the right side has two doors the top is for the meat 24X16X34. The bottom is to receive the coals. The whole smoker is TWO bricks thick (thermal mass) nearly 1100 bricks

    The Chimney caps will be installed today ....... maybe and then on to designing the "Lid" for the BBQ pit on the far left More sheetmetal another trip to the scrap yard

    If I can provide more PIX are any thing else except labor or materials let me know.......rick
     
  11. quietstar

    quietstar Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the information Rick...You have built with pride to last... from your pictures, I thought the doors came as framed units and might work in a brick/clay oven I have planned. Small note: I visited my grandfathers old homeplace in Cut N' Shoot Texas recently and inspected the log smokehouse he built atound 1920. Although it hasnt been used to smoke meat in half a century, the log walls still have a wonderful smell of curing bacon and hams. I believe yours will last as long....Glen
     
  12. angus_guy

    angus_guy Well-Known Member

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    The door frames are 3"X3"x.25" angle Iron
    The doors are 16"X24"X.25" sheet metal

    The Coal Hearth Doors Frames Are 3"x3"x.25"
    The Coal Hearth Door is 14.875"X28"X.25"

    The reason for such heavy metal is to deter warping I am sure these could be modified to fit into an oven

    The reason for 3X3 angle is min 2.5 was needed for lentles 3x3 was at the yard in plenty supply

    The flu's are also held up by 3x3 angle with fire brick every where else

    The flu;s are 8"X34" clay chimney liners (Heavy)
     
  13. Allan Mistler

    Allan Mistler Just a simple man

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    Wow, those are some dandies of smoke houses... I feel like a hobo showin' off my barrel smoker when you guys are showin' dual use structures. :worship:
    I guess it's the season to be thinking about the turkeys and hams though, so even though it's not quite finished (it needs a ten foot length of pipe between the fire pit and the smoker) this is my pride and joy....

    http://www.worldpath.net/~nhbfc/Homestead/smoker1.JPG

    So far it has only cost about $100 - $50 for the 275 gal fuel tank and $50 for the cement blocks and fittings (hinges, handles and pipe flanges). It will ultimately be a cold smoker where the smoke from the smudge in the fire pit rises through ten feet of iron pipe into the bottom of the smoker. there's an old 'top-hat' type of smoke stack at the top rear of the tank for the smoke to exit.

    http://www.worldpath.net/~nhbfc/Homestead/smoker2.JPG

    I have the good fortune of a hillside out by the barn where it was a 'natural' to build. Now I've just got to find another use for it for the 'off season'. Any suggestions? :D
     
  14. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Fortunately, mine hasnt cost me but a few pounds of nails and my time. The wood I use, as you can tell, is all odd stuff from milling some lumber for a guest cabin I am going to build. It was either that or throw it in the wood stove. Actually, I made some shelves out of 2 x 1's but now I must find some stainless screen or expanded metal to put on the frames.