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Discussion Starter #1
I have small slugs eating their way into my cabbage heads.

Unacceptable, I say!!!!

What have you used to eliminate this problem? I've never had the issue before.
 

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Master Of My Domain
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beer traps...put some beer in a dish and empty the slugs daily. DE will help with slugs as well.

ok...any suggestions for harlequin bugs on cabbage? this is the first year i have noticed them. they are really cool looking. i have the orange and black ones. they lay eggs that look like little barrels or kegs that have a stripe or two around them. all the buggers do is breed...geesh. oh...and eat any member of the cabbage family.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I wonder how good the beer trick will work. I just cleaned up some heads of cabbage to make sauerkraut with and these small slugs are working their way up into the head from the stem area.
I suppose that it's about impossible to treat once they get into the head.

Thanks Meloc.
 

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LOL

My parents actually had neighbours who vacuumed their lawn every day! It was a small garden and a large vacuum and their front lawn in town so everyone saw them do it. I am a little less strange, I take my hand vac out to the field and vaccum huge rows of potatoes, beans, collards etc. I only get to do 15 minutes before it needs recharging and you can't see our field from any houses - I think my secret is safe (certainly if anyone saw inside my house it would never occur to them that I spent my time vaccuming outdoors! lol)
 

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Going to try to cut & paste article on harlequin bugs...

Harlequin Bug




These true bugs only attack plants that are stressed, usually from being out of their season. Cool season vegetables that have lasted into hot weather commonly welcome this this pretty insect pest. If this is a problem your plants suffer from it's time for the plants to go into the compost pile.

Order Heteroptera, family Pentatomidae,
Murgantia histrionica


Adult--1/4" to 3/8"Adults are red (or orange or yellow) and black, shiny,flat and shield-shaped true bugs.


Eggs are very distinctive. They look like tiny white barrels with black rings and are laid in two straight rows.



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Nymphs are red, orange or yellow and black, and oval in shape.

They breed year round and can have several generations a year. Adults hibernate in plant debris.

Habitat: Many food crops such as beets, brussels sprouts, squash, cauliflower, cherries, citrus, collards, horseradish, kohlrabi, peas, mustard, radishes, turnips, tomatoes, and corn. Vegetable garden vegetables, especially mustard, broccoli, cabbage, turnips, and radishes.

Both the nymphs and adults feed heavily on all members of the cabbage family, causing light splotches, shriveling, and deformity. Can destroy a garden in a hurry.

Control: Biodiversity. Plant food crops in the proper season--the fall. Encourage birds. Plant "trap" crops of mustard, turnip greens, and the like. Spray with manure compost tea, seaweed, molasses, vinegar, and citrus oil.

The harlequin bug migrated up from Central America and became a big pest in the garden. The best control is planting mustard, cabbage, turnips, and related plants early in the spring season so they are out of the garden before the middle of March. Or better yet, plant them in the fall.

Harlequin bugs are ranked as the biggest pest of the mustard family, but they rarely ever appear in the fall of the year. When planted in the fall, the mustard and cole crops will not bolt and go to seed or turn bitter as fast. In the fall, these plants mature as the days are getting cooler and shorter, which gives them a better flavor. When planted too late in the spring, these bugs move in fast. Could this bug be telling us "Look, dummy, you are planting these plants in the wrong season"? If we would just pay attention, maybe all of the little critters have something helpful to tell us. When studied, all the insects, even the troublesome ones, are interesting.

The most fascinating thing about the harlequin bugs is their eggs. There are always ten in a bunch, two rows of five side by side, and they look just like little wine barrels. You can see the "hoops," the "cork" in the center, and the "staves" casting a shadow across the top. It is worth growing at least one mustard plant in the late spring just to get a look at the eggs.
 

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To eliminate slugs, eliminate their homes. If you are mulching heavy, and that mulch never dries out, you have supplied the slugs with a permanent home. I have mulch around my peppers and tomatoes. There is no mulch ever around my cabbages and I never find bits of slugs in my kraut!

Martin
 

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i know that was a cut and paste...but hogwash on the out of season and stressed plant comments. if the bugs are present, they will eat what they like to eat. some brassicas take a while...like certain cabbages. you can't grow everything in the fall and some items may have to be covered every year. i live in an area where it could stay 70 F nearly to november or you could see 23 F the first week of october. i had frost the before the end of september last year.

i think the major infestation i am seeing this year was the result of a june that seemed more like july.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Paquebot said:
To eliminate slugs, eliminate their homes. If you are mulching heavy, and that mulch never dries out, you have supplied the slugs with a permanent home. I have mulch around my peppers and tomatoes. There is no mulch ever around my cabbages and I never find bits of slugs in my kraut!

Martin
That's a good point. I think part of the problem is that the plants are too close to each other. I planted a bit to close and the plants themselves are huge. The slugs have all the dark shade they need under the plants. I won't make that mistake again.
 
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