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After failing to thrive and major difficulties with education in general I decided to take my DS out of public school. He had been in a couple schools in different states which make it clear the problem was him not a particular curriculum.

I homeschooled him for about 18 months. In that time I tried a few different things and wound up with what I thought was a somewhat challenging curriculum which we used for all of 6 months. DS has been going through a particularly complicated teen stage in which my being the dreaded teacher and parent was causing a lot of tensions and drama in the house. Today he started back at public school.

I came to the conclusion that with a new baby arriving that the constant fighting had to end. On a good week I would have to harass him to get a half day of school work if any was completed satisfactorily at all. I was torn because I knew he may face brutal failure. I also knew it was time for him to have to face his own consequences based on choices he was making.

He had to get tested to place him in his grade. Having barely squeaked by his final public school semester and having tested well below average every year I was very nervous. I knew more failure would hit the ole self esteem hard. Tough love isn’t easy.

So, guess what happened…?

After 18 months of bad attitude and poor effort the little brat tested well above average for the first time ever. The homework he brought home his first day was a joke. I was actually upset at how beneath his level it was. Compared to what he is capable of it looks like several grades below him. He mentioned how a lot of the kids are getting bad grades with this very level of work?!?!?!?!?

I know the school system didn’t collapse in the year and a half he was gone. The whole student body didn’t suddenly dumb down overnight. The only thing that changed was DS. The fact that this change came with minimal effort between perpetual distractions, seriously sad effort and ongoing teen issues……well it makes me wonder just what on earth our school systems are doing?!?!?

DS needed to go back for the good of the entire families harmony even if I hated to do it. As for the rest of you who ever doubted your own ability to teach your kids……if any of you have been afraid to take the homeschool plunge…..I say go for it. Imagine what several years of a well behaved kid could accomplish!!!!!!! :)

In the meantime I am shivering in my shoes. These kids who my underachiever has now eclipsed will be future leaders, doctors and teachers themselves. Hang onto your hats folks because this generation coming up won’t be ready to take the reins when it’s time.:help:
 

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The US school system has reached the point of being daycare unless you can get your kids into the 'advanced' classes.
 

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hintonlady - congratulations on teaching your son well through all you mentioned. That must make you feel some better.

Angie
 

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The US school system has reached the point of being daycare unless you can get your kids into the 'advanced' classes.
Whew, I couldn't put it any better than this! I've been substituting at my childrens school for some extra money... and to make a long story short, I cannot believe the state of our education system. It's sad... and very eye-opening. :eek: :help:

I also volunteer enough at the school to know that it's not just a substitute teacher viewpoint either.

I've also talked to many overwhelmed, stressed out seasoned teachers who have very little control over their classrooms/schedules/etc. too... for a {quick} minute I was thinking of getting an education degree... let's just say that thought quickly passed after spending several days actually in these classrooms -- and I feel like we attend a better school than most in our area. I've had several veteran teachers tell me point blank NOT to go into education. :(

Between all the other distractions, I don't honestly see how most teachers are able to really "teach" the children. Most of their teaching time is spent on discipline; redirection; meetings; crowd control; testing; and countless other "issues" that happen during any given day.

So I totally agree! One hour of good homeschooling is worth atleast 5 hours (or maybe close to 8) of sitting in a traditional classroom -- hands down.
 

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After my son died in 2007, my granddaughter had to go to a public school after being homeschooled by him from age 6 on up. At age 12, she tested out COLLEGE LEVEL in things like reading and comprehension, etc. She's a wonderful girl, but college level?

AND, she was never taught to write cursive....I see a lot of that, too. Oh for the Palmer Penmanship method! Seems everything all of you have said is true.....
 

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I totally understand what you are saying. Regretfully today was Levi and Faith's first day in public school also. After homeschooling for 3 years I was faced with not having enough time to take care of the kids and school them. I'm just too worn out to do anything the next day.

They have both been using Singapore Math and LOVED it. Levi would do 20 pages in his textbook, including the problems, and I had to force him to stop. Faith would peek over at his work and tell him the answers before he could write them down. *L* The 2nd grade teacher showed me the workbook they are using and it is crazy. Even she said it goes back and forth between concepts. How can a 7 year old learn if you are constantly skipping around? I feel horrible because I know that they would be getting such better schooling at home than they are going to be in public school. Oh, they are using "Everyday Math".....

What really got me worried is that while touring the school I could hear a teacher screaming at the top of her lungs at the students in her class. They were watching a movie about Alaska. The only people allowed to yell at my kids are me and my husband. :)

I am have a feeling of being a prisoner. Now the local government has more control over my kids and family than I do. If this doesn't work they will be coming back home. Faith loved her first day in kindergarten. Levi will be getting home in 45 minutes. I have a feeling he will hate it. He said the only reason he will be going to school is to eat the lunch we prepared.

Good Luck to you and your son. I hope your home becomes peaceful before that little one makes an entrance.

When did group counseling become a mandatory class for elementary students????
 

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we are currently homeschooling

when people ask me - "Are you going to do it all through high school?"
I shrug & say that we will just take it 1 year at a time

The more I read & hear, the more I'm about ready to start saying "Yes, we will"
 

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I know 4 public school teachers in this very small school district that homeschool their own children.
 

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I workout with 3 ex teachers who are just thrilled that I homeschool my dd's. My dh wants them to start middle school next year but I'm thinking I should keep them home. I'm not liking what I hear about the things that are going on in the local ps even though we live in a district that is supposed to be one of the best in the area.
 

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We went to HUGE lengths to find a good school for DS when he started last year.
We packed up and moved away! just to be where we are now for the public charter school that he goes to.
He and I talked about it then and we talk about it now and he does not want to be homeschooled.
So far I am very impressed with the curriculum there. They are a pilot school for the Core Knowledge program and I like it. By the end of kindergarten he was expected to read his story, read the question and answer in a complete sentence including puncuation and quotation properly applied when necessary. I was blown away, but he did it all with no problem. They also use Saxon math and DS enjoys it very much (math wiz)
I could not have faced putting him in a regular public school at all! No Way!! But public charter is ok so far.. thank goodness. It would have been awful to move this far and then hate it.
 

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When did group counseling become a mandatory class for elementary students????
Short answer: When school systems cut out other electives, like Art, Music, and PE, for budget reasons.

In many states it is mandatory that all schools have a guidance counselor on staff, but it is NOT mandatory to have elective classes like art offered. Also, teachers are required by law to have a planning period every day, so they have at least a 30 minute break from their kids.

Soooo, lots of principals put two and two together - need elective classes so teachers can have state-mandated planning periods......have mandatory guidance counselors on staff - lets have the guidance counselors "teach" an elective period so we don't have to spend money hiring an elective teacher!

Voila! Instant required classroom/group counseling for students. Nevermind that the counselor can't counsel kids anymore, because they are stuck in a classroom all day :grump:
 

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I'd like to caution each of you against, perhaps, using "one instance" as a generalization. Teachers are required to be certified to teach any specific class. Counselors may or maynot be certified teachers (they may have their degress in social work or psychology), therefore it could be perfectly legal for them to teach a class.

By the way.......my planning period, which is also my lunch time.....is 20 minutes. I'm supposed to check the office for my messages, complete lesson plans, return parent phone calls, make copies, eat my lunch, and go to the bathroom....on my 20 minutes. I'm fairly certain that many of you get more time than that.

and......I'm proud to be a teacher!!
 

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Heidi's Goats, we, too, had the experience of seeing and hearing a kindergarden "teacher" screaming and repeatedly threatening the poor children - who weren't doing ANYTHING but things that a 5-year-old usually does (squirm, turn around in their seat, etc.). The experience was truly horrifying! That convinced my son & DIL to homeschool.
 

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I'd like to caution each of you against, perhaps, using "one instance" as a generalization. Teachers are required to be certified to teach any specific class. Counselors may or maynot be certified teachers (they may have their degress in social work or psychology), therefore it could be perfectly legal for them to teach a class.

By the way.......my planning period, which is also my lunch time.....is 20 minutes. I'm supposed to check the office for my messages, complete lesson plans, return parent phone calls, make copies, eat my lunch, and go to the bathroom....on my 20 minutes. I'm fairly certain that many of you get more time than that.

and......I'm proud to be a teacher!!


Luckily I'm not using one instance as a generalization ;) I'll also say that I have all the respect in the world for teachers, as I come from a family of teachers and I know what they do and how little they are compensated for it.

While I've only worked in two states, they had pretty much the same regulations.... but thats just my experience. I work in the counseling field and because I work closely with the school system I am good friends with a fair number of Guidance Counselors.

Both states I have been in, Guidance Counselors have to have a master's degree in school counseling (or a master's degree in counseling with an add on certification specific to school counseling). Regular psychology or social work degrees, even Master's degrees, were not accepted.

I'm not saying its illegal for guidance counselors to teach classes.... I am saying that a guidance counselor who is tied up in a classroom all day cannot be available for students in crisis (example: student had a death in the family and is sad and confused, needs a counselor for some basic grief counseling).
 

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for a {quick} minute I was thinking of getting an education degree... let's just say that thought quickly passed after spending several days actually in these classrooms -- and I feel like we attend a better school than most in our area. I've had several veteran teachers tell me point blank NOT to go into education. :(

How do you sub without a degree in education?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'd like to caution each of you against, perhaps, using "one instance" as a generalization. Teachers are required to be certified to teach any specific class. Counselors may or maynot be certified teachers (they may have their degress in social work or psychology), therefore it could be perfectly legal for them to teach a class.

By the way.......my planning period, which is also my lunch time.....is 20 minutes. I'm supposed to check the office for my messages, complete lesson plans, return parent phone calls, make copies, eat my lunch, and go to the bathroom....on my 20 minutes. I'm fairly certain that many of you get more time than that.

and......I'm proud to be a teacher!!

I applaud you for being a teacher. It is a hard job that is underpaid and involves overworking. Teaching in my opinion is tied for being the second most important profession with doctors.

I would never ever blame teachers as a whole for school issues. Seen excellent teachers seen some who should be in another line of work. :)

The real problem is a bad mix of undisciplined, unmotivated and often disrespectful kids + low funding for salaries, extra programs and equipment + parents who often do as little as possible and raise kids with T.V. + administrations who are a combination of having hands tied and/or not having anything but their inflated salaries at heart = the downfall of our nation one lost mind at a time.

You are deep in the trenches in a losing battle. I only wish it weren't so.
 

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How do you sub without a degree in education?
Tracy, in several states in the US, you do not have to have a degree (notice I said "a degree" -at all- not a degree in education) to sub. You just have to have a high school diploma. In fact, in some, you don't even have to pass a test to prove that you can do the course work from the class for which you are subbing. In some states you do. (But homeschoolers are not "qualified" to teach our kids at home because we don't have a degree in education.) :rolleyes:

Cindyc.
 

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How do you sub without a degree in education?
If I remember right, in our area you only have to have a high school diploma to be a substitute teacher. I have 3 years of college credits towards a bachelors degree in nursing -- but was thinking of going back and changing to education. I love teaching, love the kids but I honestly don't know if I could do it day after day after day -- that's why I started substituting, to see if I would truly love it.

Let me say that I know many good teachers. Many give 110% to their class everyday, and even in their "off" hours at night too. But that's not to say there aren't some bad apples, just like in any profession. So I am not knocking teachers at all, I hope my post didn't come across as that. And I think the school is as good as the administration in most instances... you have the good & the bad in that capacity too.

And I do think that teachers deserve at least a $20K annual raise. :happy: Talk about an underpaid profession!

~Ashley
 

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The problems in education don't usually lie with the teachers.

Instead, the problems lie in the system.

No Child Left Behind is totally unrealistic. It's placed more and more work, it's forcing more and more teachers to just "teach to the test." Because funding is now tied with performance--of all kids--teachers have stopped being creative. They've had to instead get those numbers. THe pressure on them is overwhelming.

who suffers? The kids and the teachers, and eventually society.

another problem is that teachers can't discipline kids anymore. You can't send a misbehaving child the the principals office for a spanking anymore. You can't even have that be an option that might keep the kids behaving. Too many parents think their darling angel would never misbehave and then jump the teacher, showing their children that they don't have to respect adults, or obey their teachers. and often, these same parents want the school to teach manners and ethics to their darling children when the parents themselves refuse reinforce those manners and ethics.

The problem with public education won't go away until we as parents stand up and force society to change. Unfortunately, I don't see that happening mainstream...

Oh, and the Mom who is confused by "Everyday Math"...That is the worst math program there is. My DD is now struggling with math because she can't do simple division. They way Everyday math teaches division is utterly stupid. DD (who's now in a school that uses "regular" math) is finally having to learn math and to apply it. Everyday math is a joke. I hate that program, and it's getting shoved down teacher's throats because it conforms to those darn standardized tests.
 

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I think the burning question for a lot of these comments is....why did it get like this?

Here in our school district, we, who live in a nice area in a nice neighborhood with HIGH prices to get nice neighbors and homes, are FORCED to crosstown bus to a school that requires metal detecting to enter and has more gang activity than most of South L.A., where teen pregnancy is normal and drug use in the bathroom is considered passe. A place that was voted one of the worst schools in the country...20 times in a row. Where 89% of the students (keep in mind that 10% of students are cross town bussers from middle class neighborhoods) have a parent on welfare. That means 1% of the parents work. This school where nothing is taught but where teachers simply try to maintain control while kids sit around and talk on the desks, text openly during class and threaten teachers' children if they try to send them to the office. Where a child can be strangled with a bike chain...in class...and the offender is punished by sending home for the rest of the day only.

This is what we get for working hard to live somewhere nice in a nice school district. The answer to why we have to do this we are told is that not only people from the projects should have to go to the projects school and they should be allowed to cross town bus to a nicer school so we have to go to theirs.

Hello....logic?

To me, this is the bottom line for schools. When schools are expected to service those who a) never contribute one iota to taxes b) have parents who never work and have no work ethic c) have no self control and clearly have not been parented and d) use the schools only as a place to launch early criminal enterprises; then we are doomed to having bad schools.

We are simply throwing good money after bad. The only answer is to CLOSE public schools or turn them into pay schools, either via tax number or by merit alone. We've spread the money too thin between illegal immigrants and the welfare folks.
 
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